A New Poll!! Did you play/practice a string instrument for at least a year before starting ukulele?

Did you play/practice a string instrument for at least a year before starting ukulele?

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Gee, I don’t know. I’d love to be able to say that one night I was sitting around a campfire when one of my companions suddenly pulled out a trombone and started wailing on it.

Couple folks bring kitchen style bagpipes to folk song circles. They leave their Great Highland Bagpipes at home. 😁
 
Started about 10 years ago. Not really progressing (I must have just not figured a good practice routine. I think its too scattershot, and I do play a lot).
I tried mandolin in college but my instructor was so critical I quit.
 
Started about 10 years ago. Not really progressing (I must have just not figured a good practice routine. I think its too scattershot, and I do play a lot).
I tried mandolin in college but my instructor was so critical I quit.
Do you have a teacher? It might be worthwhile looking into some in person time with someone, to help you break through to the next level.
 
I couldn't stop myself from googling it:


Hah!

Kitchen pipes and border pipes have a moderate sound level similar to concertinas. They are meant to be played ensemble, but mostly in the D scale starting at the A note.

Great Highland Bagpipes are massively loud to be played on parade and battlefields. GBH are mostly uncooperative with anything else besides the drum corps because they have irregular intervals between notes and the fundamental A note isn’t pitched at 440 hertz; it can be anywhere from 460-475 hertz depending on choice of the pipe major! Which means to play with bands and symphonies (Amazing Grace, Mull of Kintyre, Imperial March, Mairi’s Wedding, etc) at 440 hertz the pipes need extensions to the three drone pipes, longer new chanter pipes, new reeds to match the four pipes, and ability to tune to 440 hertz without unbalancing the magic. And yeah - it’s all sorta D scale starting at A…
 
Ukulele is actually the first and only string instrument I ever learned how to play, I remember playing a few other instruments in music class when I was in elementary school though but none of them were string instruments
 
Started about 10 years ago. Not really progressing (I must have just not figured a good practice routine. I think its too scattershot, and I do play a lot).
I tried mandolin in college but my instructor was so critical I quit.

I might understand the situation. I've been playing the ukulele for 3 years, but I've not practiced since the first 6 or months https://www.forum.ukuleleunderground.com/index.php?threads/when-active-learning-stops.156118/

The reason is that, after 6 months of learning, I'm at a skill level that allows me to play all the songs I want to play. So... being lazy... I just stopped learning/practicing. I still play everyday, but that's very different than pushing that skill envelope. Perhaps this describes your situation too?

But, there's a bit more to my story:

Recently, I decided to finish the eMedia ukulele computer training course that I bought 3 years ago for no reason other than to say "I finished it" ( https://www.forum.ukuleleundergroun...y-anything-hobby-related.156419/#post-2367706 )

This is the computer training software I bought 3 years ago and only used it for 6 months (until it got into chord melody, which was kind of hard and not really needed in my strum/sing usage of the ukulele). So, after a break of 2.5 years, I finished it in a few days.

I was a bit surprised by how easy the course felt. Honestly, I don't credit that to the 2.5 years of playing the uke; instead, the credit goes to my classical guitar lessons. The 2 instruments are very smilar and with skills that transfer easily.

Back to you (or anyone else):

If you are open to classical guitar, there is a very good free online class at https://www.classicalguitardelcamp.com/ The time spent learning the classical guitar can be directly transferred to the uke. So, if you are at where you need to (generally) be with the uke; maybe consider using the classical guitar to expand your skills (then when that 1% of time when you actually want to play, say, melody, etc. on the uke, you can hit the ground running, so to speak). It is different than learning that skill on the uke (at least for me) because I just don't ever use it on the uke (so chances are, I'll forget it anyway).

I'm currently taking the 2nd year free Delcamp class (although it is Delcamp 2nd year, it is more like the second half of everybody else's first year. The Delcamp material progresses much slower than normal; Delcamp breaks up a 4-year university program into 10 years. I actually like it because it causes no stress. The recommended time is 1.5-2 hrs/week which includes class/practice/recording time. Normal university guitar class expects somethings like 3hrs of class time + 3hr of practice time = 6hr/wk. So you can see the difference in speed of learning. I took a guitar class at San Jose State U. a few years ago.)

If you're interested, feel free to ask me questions on Delcamp. It is really a nice class.
 
I played piano for 50 years, classical guitar for about 40 years, mandolin for 20, violin for about 15, a semester of hammered dulcimer and celtic harp for perhaps 15-20 years. I am nearly 68 and started playing and taking lessons at age 5. I picked up uke out of curiosity when my daughter left one at home before attending university.
 
Been playing some kind of musical instrument since age 4. Started out on the Hammond organ, tried Cello for a year in 5th grade jumped to drums and percussion for most of my childhood and teen/college years, College is when I found the acoustic guitar and I played sporadically for many years. Took classical piano lessons for a few years, starting in my late 30s.

I rekindled my love for guitar in 2015 or so when I happened along a used Larrivee L-03 in a local guitar shop. I have since bought 4 more Larrivee guitars including a classical from 1977. Started messing around with the Ukulele during this time frame and found a soprano Lyra ukulele when I went to look at a classical guitar at a private sale. I picked up both of them for $150 total. The ukulele is in much better playable condition then the guitar which needs a neck reset. So I dabbled here and there with that soprano, and because I love to buy musical instruments, and Ukulele's can be had for a song, I now have purchased a total of 4 ukuleles.

My latest ukulele purchase is my first "quality" ukulele. It's a luthier made all solid American walnut back sides, and top with Honduran mahogany neck beauty that I cannot put down. Here's a link to the photos I posted in another thread: https://forum.ukuleleunderground.co...***-post-your-uke-pics-here.1732/post-2378106

This ukulele is doing the same thing my first Larrivee did, which is making me play it several hours a day. I think my guitars are getting jealous.
 
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My latest ukulele purchase is my first "quality" ukulele. It's a luthier made all solid American walnut back sides, and top with Honduran mahogany neck beauty that I cannot put down. Here's a link to the photos I posted in another thread: https://forum.ukuleleunderground.co...***-post-your-uke-pics-here.1732/post-2378106
Oh yes. I remember wiping up the drool puddle generated by those pics. It looks absolutely gorgeous, and I'm delighted that you're enjoying playing it so much. That's most excellent.
 
Bass guitar for 20 years or so... not the best instrument for a song writers accompany, but that never stopped me!
 
Ive been a guitarist for over 50 years, and played bass in one of my bands.
I bought an inexpensive ($30) Johnson soprano about 10 years ago to have something to sit on the couch & play Christmas tunes. Ive really grown to love the uke. Been teaching an adult ukulele group for the last 4 years and an after school elementary group the last 2 years. Good fun!
 
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