All Enya HPL models DISCONTINUED

Pyewacket

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Awhile back I shot an email out to Enya asking how much their HPL ukes weigh.

I got an answer back - they have to get that info from the factory (so still waiting on that) BUT along with that, they told me they have discontinued their entire HPL line.
So if you've had an eye on any of the 4 HPL ukes they carry, best get while the gettin' is good.

Huge disappointment to me. I find the carbon fiber composite versions too heavy so I won't be replacing with any of those should something untoward happen to one of my HPL ukes.
 
Awhile back I shot an email out to Enya asking how much their HPL ukes weigh.

I got an answer back - they have to get that info from the factory (so still waiting on that) BUT along with that, they told me they have discontinued their entire HPL line.
So if you've had an eye on any of the 4 HPL ukes they carry, best get while the gettin' is good.

Huge disappointment to me. I find the carbon fiber composite versions too heavy so I won't be replacing with any of those should something untoward happen to one of my HPL ukes.
I don't own any Enya products but recognize their popularity. I wonder if they're going to replace the hpl line with another style/build?
 
@Eggs_n_Ham
They didn't say - and I'm guessing if they are and are ready to announce that, they would have mentioned it.

@badhabits
If you're talking about the HPL versions, I have 2 and I find neither to be "heavy". And they are much much lighter than their Les Paul shaped carbon fiber composite brethren (from Enya). By a LOT.

I have the pineapple and the tenor. I like them because I don't have to spend any time worshipping the wood to keep it in shape. I have 2 harps and 3 native american flutes that I have to maintain. That's quite enough already.

And the sound is just right for me. I don't need to blast it out to a concert hall or over bar noise.
 
Just wanted to mention: I doubt Enya will come out with a differently shaped carbon fiber composite version of either the Mini U (ukes) or the Nova Go (guitars). That stuff is a resin, not actual carbon fiber, which can be quite thin and lightweight. It has to be cast in a mold as far as I know at least. It is unlikely that they could make a lightweight uke or travel guitar in the stuff.

I would LOVE to be proven wrong, but I'm doubting it. I think if they COULD make those items lighter in the carbon fiber composite, they would already be doing it.

I'm a big big fan of low maintenance instruments. Sad to see this affordable choice taken away. I am willing to bet that its not lack of interest that is causing them to discontinue these models, but lack of markup. Now that they are pretty well known as a uke manufacturer, it is not surprising that they would choose to concentrate on those instruments for which they get a higher rate of return. They don't need to make cheap instruments to get a foot in the door any more.
 
Martin makes HPL ukuleles (soprano and concert sizes) that are much lighter weight (and also much better sounding) than the Enya versions. Enya was selling their ukuleles at a very cheap price (under $100) and that forced them to use simpler construction techniques that wouldn't work thinner lighter weight materials.
 
@man0a

You're not seriously comparing $700 instruments to $80 to $150 instruments? LOL! OK there is a concert uke @$350.

However every one that I looked at is strung with steel strings. Between the cost and the strings, that's a straight up no-thanks.

However the design of these Enya models might have been "compromised", it doesn't show in playability. And as I have repeatedly said, these instruments are not "heavy". They may (or may not) be heavIER than some (maybe even most) similar wood instruments. Still not heavy. It is not worth it to me to pay 5 or 8 times as much for a few ounces less in weight and then getting stuck with steel strings.

Other people's mileage may vary. Thanks for mentioning it - there might be some people who are interested. I've looked specifically for HPL ukes and did not come across these before, and usually when I HAVE found something that says "HPL" it has a wood soundboard.

I have been VERY happy with my Enya HPL ukes. I'm already learning finger picking - something I never even got close to in 3 years of lessons on a full size nylon-strung guitar in the 70s. I don't think my teacher was all that good for one thing - lots of things I've learned on the internet that he never told me that have made playing much easier for me here 45 years later, even with my old small hands LOL! The other part of that is that guitar would have definitely been too big for me. I didn't know they came in sizes, LOL!

Seriously - thanks for mentioning it. They're not for me, but good info for others with different tastes (which is probably, honestly, most people).

EDIT: I did find ONE with flurocarbon strings. It is this one, a soprano in somebody's idea of a "decorative" pattern @$350:


OOPS, also comes in "plain" for the same price:


Except for my pineapple (which cost me $58 including tax), sopranos are totally off my radar. But in case somebody else likes it.
 
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I like them because I don't have to spend any time worshipping the wood to keep it in shape. I have 2 harps and 3 native american flutes that I have to maintain.
Just out of curiosity, have you ever owned a solid wood ukulele? Things on the Internet aside, I think you would be surprised at how tough they are. There is an SS Stewart ukulele on the wall behind me made of solid wood that I was playing earlier today. It's 104 years old. Its previous owner who had it for years bought it from someone in Arizona, where I assumed it spent most of its life. It's fine - needed three new bridges and two sets of frets (good instruments get played a lot!), but there's no reason it won't be playable for years to come.

However every one that I looked at is strung with steel strings. Between the cost and the strings, that's a straight up no-thanks.
Where did you get this from? I am not aware of Martin ever making ukuleles with steel strings. Each page on the website you linked to with a ukulele has a link to the suggested strings which are all fluorocarbon or "Polygut".

For the record, if I ever did buy a Martin, it would be an old one in solid wood. The OXKs are nice to play, but you're paying for the name. And they're made in Mexico, because according to Martin it's cheaper than making them in China. That's pretty depressing if you think about it.
 
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That's great that you have been VERY happy with your Enya HPL ukes. But HPL ukes are heavier by nature and most are quieter than typical. Many owners and reviewers have brought this up. My own X1M concert (2 actually, the first was replaced for a warped neck) was 150-200 gm heavier than my other concerts and low volume. Again the quietness is well known, but if it works for you then run with it.
 
I gave two grandkids the round HPL camp uke model. It was quiet, but that was not a bad thing. The best aspects were that it had a truss rod and the neck disassembled from the body, so it was fantastic for packing in a suitcase.
 
I gave two grandkids the round HPL camp uke model. It was quiet, but that was not a bad thing. The best aspects were that it had a truss rod and the neck disassembled from the body, so it was fantastic for packing in a suitcase.

Yeah, the little coin HPL uke IS very quiet. But probably a good idea for kids, to keep the noise factor down LOL!
 
Just out of curiosity, have you ever owned a solid wood ukulele? Things on the Internet aside, I think you would be surprised at how tough they are. There is an SS Stewart ukulele on the wall behind me made of solid wood that I was playing earlier today. It's 104 years old. Its previous owner who had it for years bought it from someone in Arizona, where I assumed it spent most of its life. It's fine - needed three new bridges and two sets of frets (good instruments get played a lot!), but there's no reason it won't be playable for years to come.


Where did you get this from? I am not aware of Martin ever making ukuleles with steel strings. Each page on the website you linked to with a ukulele has a link to the suggested strings which are all fluorocarbon or "Polygut".

I've owned solid wood guitars, a solid wood mandoline, and the aforementioned harps and Native American Flutes. Some recorders. Probably a few things I've forgotten - I've owned a whole lot of different instruments over the past 60 years. Oh there was a Japanese end-blown flute - a shakuhachi, actually that may have been bamboo, a Chinese end-blown flute that I can't remember the name of, some pan pipes.

So thanks, but I would rather NOT have to deal with alternating issues of humidity and dryness. I may not have the choice in the future - but for one thing I don't have that much future to worry about, and for another, I'm doing well with what I've got so far in the Uke department. With any luck they'll make it as far as I do.

Also also not having to worry about taking it out with me somewhere is a huge plus. Especially if I forget and leave it in the car.

As for "where I got this from" (re steel strings) that would be the Martin website.


Each and every ukulele there except the two mentioned above are strung with some variety of steel strings according to the specs.

And yeah some of those are guitars. I was looking for any HPL instrument and didn't differentiate between guitars and Ukes. I'll have to go back and check if there are any ukes BESIDES the sopranos, which are not my schtick anyway, but I THINK there was at least a concert. I've looked at too many ukes (and guitars) today.

For example the LX1 Little Martin says: Recommended Strings: Authentic Acoustic Lifespan® 2.0 Guitar Strings Phosphor Bronze - Medium

The D-X2E says: Recommended Strings: Authentic Acoustic Lifespan® 2.0 Guitar Strings Phosphor Bronze - Light

And on like that.

EDIT: NOPE. All guitars except for the soprano ukes. The concert I THOUGHT was in that batch must have been some other brand that I've already forgotten. And the guitars are all off my radar because of the steel strings. I already have a steel string guitar. I can't find a nylon strung HPL guitar, which I was looking for (again) earlier today while also looking for other HPL ukes after I found out that Enya was discontinuing theirs. I didn't know Martin made all HPL instruments at all until a previous posting mentioned it.

So you are right. Martin doesn't make any HPL ukes with steel strings, and they don't make any HPL guitars without them LOL!
 
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've owned solid wood guitars, a solid wood mandoline, and the aforementioned harps and Native American Flutes. Some recorders. Probably a few things I've forgotten - I've owned a whole lot of different instruments over the past 60 years. Oh there was a Japanese end-blown flute - a shakuhachi, actually that may have been bamboo, a Chinese end-blown flute that I can't remember the name of, some pan pipes.
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Yes, but how much damage have you experienced to your instruments that was down to humidity?

Also also not having to worry about taking it out with me somewhere is a huge plus. Especially if I forget and leave it in the car.
If you forget and leave any uke in a car somewhere hot, expect the strings and glue to fail before anything else. And those Nova things will warp at about the same temperature as the strings.

So you are right. Martin doesn't make any HPL ukes with steel strings, and they don't make any HPL guitars without them LOL!
Yes. Ukuleles have different bracing to guitars - they would not be able to cope with steel strings. They wouldn't make an HPL nylon guitar because a solid wood one would sound better.
 
@chris667 Damage happens over time and I don't have ANY of those instruments any more. However I DID have to do a lot of retuning and readjusting. Admittedly home climate control back then was not what it is today. I'd just rather not have the bother. Not sure why you think my preferences are unimportant.

I don't have any Nova things. Well the guitar. I have the HPL ukes, which others have reported to withstand heat and cold when traveling about. Of course part of the attraction was that even if anything DID go wrong with one, I could easily afford to replace it. That's not a thing anymore, now that they are discontinued.
 
Awhile back I shot an email out to Enya asking how much their HPL ukes weigh.

I got an answer back - they have to get that info from the factory (so still waiting on that) BUT along with that, they told me they have discontinued their entire HPL line.
So if you've had an eye on any of the 4 HPL ukes they carry, best get while the gettin' is good.

Huge disappointment to me. I find the carbon fiber composite versions too heavy so I won't be replacing with any of those should something untoward happen to one of my HPL ukes.
Thank you for letting us know. I might pick one up as another fun uke that does not need to live in a humidified case. Is there a particular model you recommend?

Edit: I am sorry they are discontinued. Quiet is good for some of us who have neighbors nearby and often only have time to practice after a kid or kids go to bed. I am also interested in a playing around with painting ukuleles and at my painting skill level I do not want to do that on a ukulele that costs more than $100.
 
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Thank you for letting us know. I might pick one up as another fun uke that does not need to live in a humidified case. Is there a particular model you recommend?

Edit: I am sorry they are discontinued. Quiet is good for some of us who have neighbors nearby and often only have time to practice after a kid or kids go to bed. I am also interested in a playing around with painting ukuleles and at my painting skill level I do not want to do that on a ukulele that costs more than $100.

It just depends on what you like in Ukes. I really like the pineapple soprano, but don't care for regular sopranos, no matter who makes them or what they are made of. The pineapple is a bit more mellow than a regular soprano uke. I love my tenor. It's a very mellow uke. Between the two I don't see any reason to get a concert - though I may anyway, now that I know they are being discontinued, and keep it on the side to give to my grandson when he's older and less likely to play El Kabong with it.

The quietest of them all is the little coin uke, but I don't see it on the Enya website any more, nor can I find it on Amazon, so they may be all gone.

Got a Ukulele did reviews of 3 of the 5 HPL ukes Enya was making:


It looks like they only have the pineapple, the concert, and the tenor still in stock


The concert and tenor are both listed together, the pineapple is separate.

I should mention, HPL is essentially Formica, like you use for countertops. It typically doesn't take paint particularly well.
 
... and I did it. I have a Concert size HPL uke on the way to me. Given that my grandson has taken a shine to my HPL ukes over the one I bought for him (Enya Mini Coco, its a Mini U painted in kiddy colors) I'll be holding on to it until he is old enough to be able to use it safely.

That's my story, and I'm sticking to it ...
 
Thanks for the info. I have the coin uke. When I bought it (locally in Uzbekistan), I did some research and discovered that Enya didn't seem it on its US site, but did on its European (?) site.

I had been considering gifting this one if someone liked it and then buying another Enya HPL (maybe another model) for myself. But knowing that they're discontinuing them, I'm going to hang on to this one!

I found all of the conversation about weight slightly amusing. The only uke I ever played before this one is a concert scale banjolele. (It is a beast to try to learn ukulele on!) At any rate, my Enya HPL is absolutely featherweight in comparison. I was surprised at how light it was when I first played it. It seems weird to read talk of it being "heavy". 😂 I guess it's all a matter of perspective. 🪕🪶
 
Damage happens over time and I don't have ANY of those instruments any more. However I DID have to do a lot of retuning and readjusting. Admittedly home climate control back then was not what it is today. I'd just rather not have the bother. Not sure why you think my preferences are unimportant.
I can see retuning being necessary, but what sort of readjusting did you need to do?

I am not trying to have an argument, and I don't have an opinion one way or another about what you choose to spend your money on. But you do seem to have very strong opinions about the fragility of wooden instruments and I am trying to understand where those opinions come from.
I don't have any Nova things. Well the guitar. I have the HPL ukes, which others have reported to withstand heat and cold when traveling about.
To be clear, I am talking about the "carbon composite" (read that as mostly plastic) instruments. For the avoidance of doubt, none of them will survive being left in a car on a hot day if the windows are left closed. The strings will be the first to fail, followed by the body and/or neck warping.
I found all of the conversation about weight slightly amusing.
Well, me too TBH.
 
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