Alternate tunings to give more range?

I reread some of Daniel’s posts and I think he’s a third below standard violin tuning.

E3-B3-F#4-C#5 (violin tuning, a third lower, in fifths)
I was close with Eb3-Bb3-F4-C5.
 
Really?
You have already gone low C below a baritone low D, on a Tenor? And it works?
On two tenors: Ohana TK-70R, Lanikai CDST-T.
They are tuned to the same pitch as a "drop C" baritone.
E .024" D'Addario NYL024
B .0024w D'Addario NYL024W
G .028w D'Addario NYL028W
C .035w D'Addario NYL035W
 
I use CGDA strings (aquila 31U) on the concert ukulele. Here's a sample. It has more range than the ukulele.



If you want to play Bach at the original pitch. You can make a Ukecello from a baritone ukulele.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgAsFDORpIRCjiJ-7lIPG2Q
Ukecello = Baritone ukulele tuning CGDA (C2G2D3A3). Same tuning as a cello.
String from "Pyramid 7String Classical Guitar Set I"
String B1 - tuning C2
String E2 - tuning G2
String A2 - tuning D3
string D3 - tuning A3
B3 Not used
E4 Not used


Wow. What brand and strings did you use for each. Wow
 
If a lot more range is needed one can add more strings... like a guitar has. Turning a uke into something it's not supposed to be may not be the best approach.
 
One notable classical ukuleleist tunes in fifths which offers a fifth more range than low G tuning...
Yes:
GDAE on a soprano or concert starts at the same pitch as ukulele "low" G (G3) and extends to a high E (E5) that is seven half-steps (a 5th) above ukulele A.

#1 E5
#2 A4
#3 D4
#4 G3
 
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If one adds strings - a guitalele is a possibility
Thinking about this… I may try the high e tuning Guitalele set on a tenor. Use the 6th string in the 4th spot, the 5th in the third spot, the third in the second, and the high e in the first.

E3 B3 g4 e5

That’s greater range than 5ths tuning, and an open e minor chord.

If the tension is too high on the B or high e strings, tune it all down to D.

Might be a cool experiment!

🙂
 
I’m still noodling over this quandary. I’m currently wondering if I were to get a guitalele would I be able to supply a baseline to a banjo’s melody line on songs?

Banjo standard G=g4-D3-G3-B3-d4
Guitalele standard C tuning =A2-D3-G3-C4-E4-a4

I think the overlapping octave ranges might “get in the way of” each other. Thoughts?
 
I’m still noodling over this quandary. I’m currently wondering if I were to get a guitalele would I be able to supply a baseline to a banjo’s melody line on songs?

Banjo standard G=g4-D3-G3-B3-d4
Guitalele standard C tuning =A2-D3-G3-C4-E4-a4

I think the overlapping octave ranges might “get in the way of” each other. Thoughts?
A lot of potential in this idea!

The first idea that comes to mind:
Take off the high a string. Move strings 2-5 up one spot. Put the high a string in spot 5, tune down to g. Tune the low A down to G. Tune the c down to b, the e down to d

G2 g4 D3 G3 B3 d4

🙂
 
My tenor is mostly kept in a kind of drop F.
F C F A
With a low G string
 
This is an interesting thread. I'm curious to know what others have tried in this regard.

A few years ago (during covid lockdowns), I came across the recordings of Gordon Mark and went on a Lyle Ritz binge. I soon became enamored with very low tension tunings on the tenor scale, and this turned into a short-lived obsession with alternative strings sets and nuts cut to facilitate their mounting. At one point, I had successfully tuned the top string of a tenor uke to D3 then spread the open strings across as much as two octaves and a major third. Electrification helped.

The really wide intervallic spreads weren't always practical, but as much as two octaves proved useful in certain musics. Diminishing the low pitch to D3 granted access to quite a few sonic possibilities; increasing the intervallic spread of the courses was more involved, but certain tunings were surprisingly powerful.
 
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