Another tip

Timbuck

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I made up a ship load of triangular kerfed linings and I wasn't happy with the unsightly sawn finish left by the bandsaw blade, I normally spend a bit of time sanding these smooth by hand but it's pain in the butt job. So today I came up with this setup and it's works great...and it can be done before the kerfs are cut as well as after.


before and after.
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Nice. I use the same sort of setup for solid linings, sides, bindings, etc., using a section of 4x4 post as the backstop (since I don't have a drum sander yet.)
 
I made up a ship load of triangular kerfed linings and I wasn't happy with the unsightly sawn finish left by the bandsaw blade, I normally spend a bit of time sanding these smooth by hand but it's pain in the butt job. So today I came up with this setup and it's works great...and it can be done before the kerfs are cut as well as after.


before and after.
View attachment 160134


I've never had any success trying to make those triangular, slotted strips. I wind up buying them from Stew-Mac.
 
Everybody gets "no joy" from making kerfing. If you are doing it manually on the tablesaw, stack as many blades as you can get on the arbor. If you have the ability to make spacers in aluminum, that's perfect, but hardwood spacers work fine and are easy to make. I get 4 kerf cuts for every pass, so 4 times as fast. Typically I work with a sheet of wood, sanded to thickness, about 6" wide, and as long as I want the kerfing to be. I use a hold down board as I pass the wood through the saw to keep the kerfing from lifting as it gets cut.
 

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Only in the US Bob. This is ILLEGAL in the UK. Ken has a kerfing machine. I have one of them. My interns love using it.... so do I. It fills me with awe and wonder and great admiration for my friend Ken every time I use it.
 
You mean it is illegal in the U.K. to do what you want in your own shop, providing you don't have employees? I don't believe the rest of the world checks up on stuff like that. That's weird! Anybody going to individual shops to check up on you? Time to loosen up a bit! You have 4 times the possibility of getting hurt by your saw if you have to spend 4 times the amount of time making kerfing! I agree that a kerfing machine would be better, but the tablesaw does a really clean job and I can make enough in a couple of hours to last a year.
 
The problem i found making them with the table saw is you can't control the depth of kerf revative to the thickness of the material ..and you have to sand down the back of the kerf side afterwards to the dimension required for easy bending...once set up the kerfing machine gets em right first go...Bob do you do triangle or square ?.
 
Ken, I make square kerfing, with a rounded over edge, for ukes. I make triangular for guitars. I don't have much problem with the depth of the cut because I press down on the wide stock as it goes over the blades. I admit that I do have to pass a few strips through the sander to thin the backs a little more sometimes. I have a funkymanual shopmade drum sander for that. Tried to figure out how to get my widebelt sander to do that, but I just end up with a lot of broken strips. The triangle stuff I angle on the bandsaw. Admitedly messy. However, my orbital air sander cleans up the angle side of the strip in maybe 20 seconds, so not too painful. I do a lot of stuff by hand that I wish I had machines for, but I'm pretty low production these days.-Bob
 
I also use a press down caul, after determining depth on scrap. I use my table saw to make the rips. If I forget to use a tape backer, I remember when the blade knocks out the kerfs. I angle my bandsaw table to make the linings triangular. I use a table-mounted, belt-sander to take out the saw marks--careful so's not to "stub my toe." Lastly, I take a whole bunch of tea bags out to the nearest body of water, dump them in, and have a cup of coffee. Just funnin' you guys. We use that for Southern style, sweet tea here in Florida. Watch your finger y'all! And Mr Ken--thanks for your generous sharing of your ingenuity--I mean that with the sincerest appreciation and respect.
 

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