B33R!

WHERE ARE THE WALDOS?

Lagunitas
Brewing has just released their famed The Waldos triple IPA... this ultra hopped up 3IPA clocks in at 11.4% ABV... Wow!!!

Once you've tried one, nothing compares at all...

Drink more than two, and nothing makes sense at all!

A truly delicious beer if you like a super giant IPA. I'm not sure how far from Northern California this beer is shipped, but if you can find a six pack at your store, grab it. They sell out fast. Look for the special release purple six pack carrier and the distinctive purple caps.
 
WHERE ARE THE WALDOS?

Lagunitas
Brewing has just released their famed The Waldos triple IPA... this ultra hopped up 3IPA clocks in at 11.4% ABV... Wow!!!

Once you've tried one, nothing compares at all...

Drink more than two, and nothing makes sense at all!

A truly delicious beer if you like a super giant IPA. I'm not sure how far from Northern California this beer is shipped, but if you can find a six pack at your store, grab it. They sell out fast. Look for the special release purple six pack carrier and the distinctive purple caps.

Umm, good. Thanks for the tip.

PXL_20230416_025053675.jpg
 
How has the beer thread been dormant for a whole year? 😮

I just had a pet peeve of mine renewed.

Beer with added sugar/syrup.
I dont know about the other side of the pond, but in Denmark I have to read carefully on the ingredients lists to avoid them. Accidentially bought a Hoegarden wheat beer tonight.

When I was young, I liked them all right. Now as a somewhat middle aged man, I find that they make me feel uncomfortably quesy when I have them. And further more, I suspect that they make my the beer breath linger more than beer without.

Any others with the same impression?
 
Beer with added sugar/syrup.
What?!?! Ok now I'm going to look for this. Do you mean post-fermentation additional sugar? Yuck. It's BEER. At most, "malty" is the closest it should ever get to sweet. That's the point.

It's now my least favourite beer season: it's almost impossible to obtain beer that isn't saison or sour or some other freaking awful fruit inspired disgusting combination. I used to grump about trendy Hefeweizen but I'll take that over fruity "beer" any day. Unless it's fruity Hefeweizen.

Hops. Barley. Dark and malty. 👍👍👍

Fruit. Acid. Light and fluffy. 👎👎👎 (And that's me being polite)
 
What?!?! Ok now I'm going to look for this. Do you mean post-fermentation additional sugar? Yuck. It's BEER. At most, "malty" is the closest it should ever get to sweet. That's the point.

I dont know how they go about adding it, but they taste awfully sweet - and when I check the ingredients lists it says "glucose syrup".

Hoegarden does it.
It used to like Leffe Bruin, but I can no longer enjoy it as much.
Grimbergen Bruin in undrinkably sweet.

In general many beers labelled "Bruin" and "Amber" taste very sweet. In Denmark it is also custum to have seasonal beer at Christmas and Easter - these are also often very sweet.
 
When I was an undergrad at UBC, we weren't allowed to use the term beer in the weekly BioSoc rag we'd put out, so we'd use "b33r" or "b3v3rag3". Not sure why.

But anyway - BEER!!!!

What do you like? What do you hate? Have you ever been on a trip just for beer?

I recognize that there is a lot of regional specificity to beer availability (i.e. the craft stuff I can get here differs even from the stuff I can get only a hundred km away, not to mention in a different province/state/country/hemisphere), but I'm still interested! You never know when you might find yourself somewhere that someone here is from and you're craving a thirst quencher and you know exactly what to try (or to avoid) when you're there.
I live in The Netherlands and my first husband and I loved Belgian beer. So when we went on holiday we made always sure going through Belgium and have a glass of Orval Grand Cru which was our favourite at the time. The Belgian monasteries were always famous for their beers. Westmalle was also famous. We lived in Brabant, and there was the Koningshoeve brewery. There was double and triple variety, the last one clearer and stronger. We also loved beers like Duvel ( uou had to be careful with that one, could be treacherous!) , and there were many others. There was also Lambiek, and the Kriek Lambiek ( cherry variety) was very populair. Also the white beer, ideal for hot dummer days. There were pubs were you could choose from more than 200 different beers. But never more than one glass, just to enjoy it.

My current husband doesn’t drink and neither do I. But I still love beer once in a while. The last decades breweries have been coming up, also biological and non-alcoholic. Leffe Blond 0.0 is a beer that we had last year after a one time 18 holes round of golf on a very hot summer’s day. Sanct Adelbertus is a nice monastery beer from Egmond, and in Amsterdam and Haarlem there are many local brewer. In Alkmaar there is the Beer museum, also recommendable for anyone who loves a good glass of beer!
 
I dont know how they go about adding it, but they taste awfully sweet - and when I check the ingredients lists it says "glucose syrup".

Hoegarden does it.
It used to like Leffe Bruin, but I can no longer enjoy it as much.
Grimbergen Bruin in undrinkably sweet.

In general many beers labelled "Bruin" and "Amber" taste very sweet. In Denmark it is also custum to have seasonal beer at Christmas and Easter - these are also often very sweet.
Some beers are actually designed to have a secondary fermentation in the bottle which may be what's happening here, but you run the risk of a bottle exploding, or at the very least an unwanted deposit of yeast at the bottom if you attempt it yourself, which then requires careful decanting. There isn't really anything to gain by having unfermented sugar in a beer but I guess a 'dry' beer isn't to everyone's taste, either.
 
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