Beginner Classical Ukulele

Freya Vie

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I discovered classical ukulele music yesterday and I fell in love with it!

I'd like to learn.. can anybody show me the starting point as a beginner please?

(YouTubes, books or any other references)

I did some research but it's all too overwhelming.

Ps: I'm a strummer.. I hardly fingerpick. But I can understand basic tabs.
 
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There's a Facebook group for it:

Also a website
which is connected to another fb group
 
I discovered classical ukulele music yesterday and I fell in love with it!

I'd like to learn.. can anybody show me the starting point as a beginner please?

(YouTubes, books or any other references)

I did some research but it's all too overwhelming.

Ps: I'm a strummer.. I hardly fingerpick. But I can understand basic tabs.
Samantha Muir's The Classical Ukulele Method is an excellent resource for beginners. It assumes nothing and takes you step-by-step into simple classical fingerstyle pieces.
 
If you're a visual learner, Ukulele Time does have some beginner classical play-along videos on YouTube. There are probably others as well.
 
There's a Facebook group for it:

Also a website
which is connected to another fb group
Oh thank you so much Larry! I have just joined these 2 groups!

Samantha Muir's The Classical Ukulele Method is an excellent resource for beginners. It assumes nothing and takes you step-by-step into simple classical fingerstyle pieces.
Thank you Larry! I needed that direction! Appreciate it so much!

If you're a visual learner, Ukulele Time does have some beginner classical play-along videos on YouTube. There are probably others as well.

Thank you @man0a , I will have a watch!!
 
I started with Samantha Muir's method (excellent way to learn) but I don't play reentrant now, but I found her method very approachable for beginning. Join our Classical Challenge Thread when you're ready to share your first efforts!! ALL skill levels welcome. No rush, though ;)
 
Samantha Muir's The Classical Ukulele Method is an excellent resource for beginners. It assumes nothing and takes you step-by-step into simple classical fingerstyle pieces.
Hello Larry, I've just purchased the PDF of this book, it is indeed what I was hoping for. So thank you, once again! 🤭

I started with Samantha Muir's method (excellent way to learn) but I don't play reentrant now, but I found her method very approachable for beginning. Join our Classical Challenge Thread when you're ready to share your first efforts!! ALL skill levels welcome. No rush, though ;)
I just purchased her book, Classical Ukulele Method! Indeed seems approachable!

Ahh.. which tuning do you play now then, if it's not reentrant?

Ohhh.. I think I will, soon enough. I love how you emphasized 'all skill levels'!

Thank you so much Amie, for your sharings!
 
I think you're going to find that classical music is very much about finger independence with relatively little strumming. Obviously Sam Muir's book addresses that but also if you need more practice Daniel Ward's Arpeggio meditations, while not classical, give a lot of practice on dedicating one finger per string. It may suit you as a supplemental resource.
 
I think you're going to find that classical music is very much about finger independence with relatively little strumming. Obviously Sam Muir's book addresses that but also if you need more practice Daniel Ward's Arpeggio meditations, while not classical, give a lot of practice on dedicating one finger per string. It may suit you as a supplemental resource.
Ahh.. I just looked up on the summary of the book. Thank you so much @ripock , amazing tip! I will definitely give it a try!
 
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Ahh.. which tuning do you play now then, if it's not reentrant?
Linear - I use low G (which is an octave lower than the g in reentrant). But I also now have a "lutulele" (it has a soprano scale length, is shaped similar to a lute with a bowl back, tuned like a Renaissance guitar, although with fewer strings) which has a low G and a regular high-g in reentrant strung together in a single course, then the regular C, E and A strings. I use my lutulele for playing a lot of Renaissance pieces (but not all!) and my aNueNue Moon Bird for other classical music.
If you are low G I would highly recommend Jeff Peterson's Classical Repertoire book and his Practice Routines book is useful as well.
I agree, but for an absolute beginner, Sam Muir's method is much more approachable IMO. I started with her book (and I can read music, I used to play violin) and still found it a sufficient challenge; I found Jeff Peterson's overwhelming until I had a better grasp with Sam Muir's book. If you take his lessons, that might be a completely different story.
if you need more practice Daniel Ward's Arpeggio meditations, while not classical, give a lot of practice on dedicating one finger per string. It may suit you as a supplemental resource.
I agree with this too, with another but it's a bit much for an absolute beginner. Definitely a good tool very soon after you get a grasp of the basics to help build those skills. Also this for left-hand finger independence:



I haven't used his resources, but many people here recommend Brad Bordessa for his finger independence courses: https://liveukulele.com/store/picking/

Also, look at Wilfried Welti. His stuff is excellent too.
He is a member on UU and posts videos sometimes of his playing (UU thread search). He's very skilled. Another member is Ondrej Sarek (UU thread search) who publishes a lot of arrangements of folk music and classical/early music. And of course, Choan Galvez (UU thread search)!
 
Linear - I use low G (which is an octave lower than the g in reentrant). But I also now have a "lutulele" (it has a soprano scale length, is shaped similar to a lute with a bowl back, tuned like a Renaissance guitar, although with fewer strings) which has a low G and a regular high-g in reentrant strung together in a single course, then the regular C, E and A strings. I use my lutulele for playing a lot of Renaissance pieces (but not all!) and my aNueNue Moon Bird for other classical music.

I agree, but for an absolute beginner, Sam Muir's method is much more approachable IMO. I started with her book (and I can read music, I used to play violin) and still found it a sufficient challenge; I found Jeff Peterson's overwhelming until I had a better grasp with Sam Muir's book. If you take his lessons, that might be a completely different story.

I agree with this too, with another but it's a bit much for an absolute beginner. Definitely a good tool very soon after you get a grasp of the basics to help build those skills. Also this for left-hand finger independence:



I haven't used his resources, but many people here recommend Brad Bordessa for his finger independence courses: https://liveukulele.com/store/picking/


He is a member on UU and posts videos sometimes of his playing (UU thread search). He's very skilled. Another member is Ondrej Sarek (UU thread search) who publishes a lot of arrangements of folk music and classical/early music. And of course, Choan Galvez (UU thread search)!

Ahh.. I see. Thank you for sharing about your lutulele. I've never heard about it before, till now.

Also, thank you for the heads up on the levels suitable for all the books mentioned above. I have started on Sam Muir's book, few pages in.. I'm happy with what I learnt! As a strummer, I think it "stretched" my fingers a bit for fingerpicking.

Yay to new resources! I will check out the new names above.. I did take a quick look, all their materials looked really interesting! Added to my list and will plan my "direction".
 
Phil Doleman's Thomas Campion CD is really excellent. Has tabs and tracks to listen to so you know what it sounds like.

It is surprising how modern some of the songs feel, actually.

Also, look at Wilfried Welti. His stuff is excellent too.
Ahh.. new names again! Thank you so much for sharing with me!
 
I mostly play classical ukulele and I really liked this site full of free scores/tabs


you can even download mp3 audio samples!
 
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