Beginner Classical Ukulele

I mostly play classical ukulele and I really liked this site full of free scores/tabs


you can even download mp3 audio samples!
That is Putter's UkeFever website. He often posts his new material in the Ukulele Underground tabs/chords forum.
 
I mostly play classical ukulele and I really liked this site full of free scores/tabs


you can even download mp3 audio samples!
Ahhh.. Putter's!! Thank you so much for highlighting this one!

Yes.. audio samples were a great bonus!!
 
I think its a pity that Julian Bream never played the uke. It is a type of lute after all ;)
He did play the renaissance guitar a time or two… and the baroque guitar which he apparently considered to be “ a really nice baritone ukulele”, or something like that!🙃
 
I have all of tony mizens books. Aren't those a really good foundational set?

Oh, I saw it on youtube. I think now I know which set of books I'll ask for as a birthday present. :love: I don't play much with my fingers yet, mostly strumming, but I wanna learn.

They just made my life a lot easier https://edubirdie.com/calculus-help who provided me with assistance for assignments. Thanks to their calculus help, I can dedicate more time to my ukulele practice.
 
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I'm not an expert, but maybe starting with beginner-friendly YouTube tutorials or beginner ukulele books could help:unsure: I'm more of a strummer too, so I get where you're coming from.
 
Yep, you're going to have to get used to employing individual fingers. Fortunately, every classical or campanella book I've seen has graduated levels of difficulty so that you can pick your battles, start stringing together a resumé of victories, and amass some pride and confidence. For example, I have a book which starts off with Mozart's "Ah, vous dirai-je, Maman" (which is basically twinkle twinkle little star) and ramps up the difficulty in all the subsequent pieces 'til you get to something like "Clair de Lune" towards the end or some Bach minuet with all these 16th notes
 
Yep, you're going to have to get used to employing individual fingers. Fortunately, every classical or campanella book I've seen has graduated levels of difficulty so that you can pick your battles, start stringing together a resumé of victories, and amass some pride and confidence. For example, I have a book which starts off with Mozart's "Ah, vous dirai-je, Maman" (which is basically twinkle twinkle little star) and ramps up the difficulty in all the subsequent pieces 'til you get to something like "Clair de Lune" towards the end or some Bach minuet with all these 16th notes
This!

There are so many options. Pick something and try to stick with it for a while. Enjoy the journey.

🙂
 
I discovered classical ukulele music yesterday and I fell in love with it!

I'd like to learn.. can anybody show me the starting point as a beginner please?

(YouTubes, books or any other references)

I did some research but it's all too overwhelming.

Ps: I'm a strummer.. I hardly fingerpick. But I can understand basic tabs.
I'm in the same boat as you with regards to finger style and discovering the beautiful world of classical ukulele and loving it - but probably behind you in strumming and tab recognition. I look forward to seeing and hearing your progress. I just began the Peterson course and am motivated to persevere..

All the best with this journey!
 
I think it’s important not to take on too much all at once. You might start to feel overwhelmed. Focus on small things that are within your reach and that you can polish and feel pleased about. Then move on to the next challenge. Set your sights on the individual saplings and trees, not the whole vast forest.

And enjoy yourself. This is fun, not work. 🥳
 
Not all you practice needs to be with the ukulele in hand. The finger independence that others have mentioned can be practiced almost anywhere. For example, place your hands on a surface the way you would if you were playing the piano, then make up little patterned exercises where you move one finger at a time without using the others. As you progress with this, try it with moving two or more fingers independently. These exercises help strengthen the "brain" connection to your individual fingers.

It is a somewhat separate topic, but the same can be done with the practice of rhythm. If you carry a metronome, you can practice precise rhythm anywhere.

All the little bits of time practicing away from your instrument add up, and they can be a big help in your development as a musician.
 
New to uke, but I have some music background. For me, I found it easy to find resources, and a lot of my starter ones have already been mentioned. But I found Sam Muir and Daniel Ward offered me up really useful approaches to playing. Go sloooowly. Spend time repeating just one or two bars, getting meditative, getting musical, trying different expressiveness, experimenting to figure out what makes a good tone. I also spend time working on pieces that really challenge (or far exceed 😝) my skills, but I think the most progress happens when I’m really letting myself marinate in fairly simple stuff.

My other thought, is that a nice instrument really makes a difference. I got a soprano with just lovely resonance (and fully acknowledge the privilege that allowed me to do that!), and it makes so much difference. It has made my ukulele my teacher - it gives me wonderful feedback and encouragement and tempts me to experiment. So books and Patreon subscriptions and following folks on YouTube has been lovely, but I think beginners often get told that a beginner instrument is fine. But I think particularly for fingerstyle and Campanella and such, an instrument that has nice responsiveness and plays well up the neck and is generous with tone can make a huge difference, even for those of us just starting out.
 
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