bruko linings

polimoli

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Howdy!

Recently decided to go with the Bruko no. 6 and I was wondering if anybody had any thoughts about the kerfling.

From Baz's article on 'got a ukulele': "Looking inside the uke and we see there is no kerfling (the ridged wood supports that help hold the top and back to the sides) which is intriguing as not sure how the uke is holding together. Koaloha ukes don't have kerfling either, but their bracing system does this for them. Inside the Bruko is some simple top and back bracing, and in their traditional style, no label, but just the Brüko name branded on to the wood (very cool!)." Bruko No. 6 Review

I'm curious if anybody knows the answer to this mystery! For practical reasons (ensuring the instrument doesn't implode when I travel North to more humid areas) as well as just for the sake of curiosity.

I could take some pics from the inside of my new 'ukulele later this week if anybody thinks that could be helpful!
 
The strips you are talking about are called linings. They provide a larger connection between the top, sides, and bottom. They can be solid smooth strips (solid), or thicker and kerfed, meaning regular gaps cut the full width. The blocks between cuts are called ribs. The kerfs aren't cut all the way through.

I have read, in quite a few sources, that either is fine. The kerfed lining is flexible and easier to install, the solid has to be shaped before installing. It is actually the more costly of the two, even though the kerfed looks more expensive.

With a uke that has substantial edge binding, thicker linings, usually kerfed, are used to give the binding a larger seam to fit into.

1699146357539.png.........1699146214917.png


............ This shows solid bindings installed in a bass ukulele
.............1699147786181.png
 
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The strips you are talking about are called linings. They provide a larger connection between the top, sides, and bottom. They can be solid smooth strips (plain), or thicker and kerfed, meaning regular gaps cut the full width. The blocks between cuts are called ribs. Those gaps aren't cut all the way through.

I have read, in quite a few sources, that either is fine. The kerfed lining is flexible and easier to install, the plain has to be shaped before installing. It is actually the more costly of the two, even though the kerfed looks more expensive.

View attachment 160639.........View attachment 160637
very cool information! much obliged, cheers x
 
I found another thread about various bracing. Good photos too. Seems KoAloha just uses thicker sides that equal the thickness of a usual side and lining together. You can see that the center brace is actually a rectangle.

KoAloha Unibrace -

1699173760857.png

 
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Oldjazznut - I think you should reconsider your statement (above) regarding the definition of the term "ribs".
 
Howdy!

Recently decided to go with the Bruko no. 6 and I was wondering if anybody had any thoughts about the kerfling.

From Baz's article on 'got a ukulele': "Looking inside the uke and we see there is no kerfling (the ridged wood supports that help hold the top and back to the sides) which is intriguing as not sure how the uke is holding together. Koaloha ukes don't have kerfling either, but their bracing system does this for them. Inside the Bruko is some simple top and back bracing, and in their traditional style, no label, but just the Brüko name branded on to the wood (very cool!)." Bruko No. 6 Review

I'm curious if anybody knows the answer to this mystery! For practical reasons (ensuring the instrument doesn't implode when I travel North to more humid areas) as well as just for the sake of curiosity.

I could take some pics from the inside of my new 'ukulele later this week if anybody thinks that could be helpful!

Yes, Bruko Ukes don’t have either kerfing or support strips inside of them - well not the ones that I had. Maybe the sides are slightly thicker but they still have to be bent to shape so it won’t be by much. The gluing is good (precision even) and the box is ridged; Bruko’s are well made, well thought out and as ‘tough as old boots’. Enjoy.

Is lack of internal support at the edges traditional? I don’t know, it might just be innovation, but in much wider luthery it might possibly be so; it’s rare but one builder that I know of uses (traditional) multiple small blocks around the sides rather than kerfing.
 
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Oldjazznut - I think you should reconsider your statement (above) regarding the definition of the term "ribs".
The graphic I posted, and some of my other info sources, say "rib". I think one article said "blocks".

I first looked into this years ago, wondering why my Lanikai CK-C had kerfed linings, and my other four wood ukes didn't. Apparently because my CK has prominent maple edge binding. My Lanikai LUs have narrow white ABS binding, and solid linings. The other Vineyard and Hilo have no binding, no kerfs.

1699176346279.png
 
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Binding is at the outside and is not for structural support but is a hardwood or plastic strip to protect the (softwood) top edge. Hardwood tops don't need binding.
A bit of thread drift but the original post has been addressed. Yep, that’s correct, ‘binding’ (rather than lining) was/is incorrectly in the tittle; I guess that I autocorrected that mistake without realising. 😂

I definitely see the case for protecting soft wood tops with binding. Hardwood tops are often not bound and that seems to work just fine for the vast bulk of those instruments, a useful cost saving with lots of historical precedent too. However, whilst ‘hard’ such wood can - if to a much lesser extent - still splinter, deform and catch around the edges so my preference is always for binding (a sacrificial edge that protects both instrument and user). For similar reasons I apply that preference to laminate ukes too; you can get by without binding but better to have it and not need it …

Apologies if that’s being pedantic or splitting hairs.
 
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