Chord Namer Questions

BiosphereDecay

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This is my favorite chord namer, but does not have an option for a low G. Are the names of chords the same for both gCEA and GCEA?

One of my favorite chords so far on low G is 0320. What name(s) would this chord have, assuming it's different from what the chord namer I linked says? I don't really hear major or minor in this chord, and I'm only just beginning to grasp how some of the other types of chords are used.

Let's just take this same chord(0320) as an example. Would you typically use this at the start or end of a chord progression, or somewhere in the middle? What types of chords would generally precede or follow this? I'm still not sure if the names that that chord namer I linked are accurate for low G or not, but if they are, it's one of these: Dsus4, Gsus2, A7sus4(no5).

I've read that generally the lowest note is the root, which would be the open G in this case. So, Gsus2 makes sense to me (although I still don't quite understand what sus2 actually means. Is it because there are two G's in this chord?). Why are there multiple names for most chords? And finally, what key(s) would that chord normally be used in?
 
It doesn't matter for the chord what octave the G is. That website is very incomplete and can't even identify the rootless D7 which is beloved by many uke players. The 0320 is a simple suspended D so not very common but read up in Wikipedia. For better chord look up use the SmartChord app.
 
Low G doesn't affect the name of the chord.

I'd call your chord a GSus2 because it's one-finger away from a G chord. But, if you're playing with D's and want a fun alternate to spice things up, it could be a DSus4.

You'll find a lot of chord shapes can be identified as different chords.

If you want to get TECHNICAL about it, I think whatever the lowest note is (and Low G does affect that) should define the "root" of the chord, and everything else is stacked up on that. So, if I'm right (and I don't "do" music theory, so I might not be), on standard gCEA tuning, the D note on the C string would be the lowest note and it would technically be a DSus4. On Low G, the low G is the lowest note, so GSus2 would be technically more correct. But, who cares???

^^^ In whichever case, moving the root to another string would be called an "inversion" of the chord. Not incorrect, just an inversion of the same set of notes.
 
:ROFLMAO: I started out as a huge fan of UkeBuddy, and still use it knowing its limitations...and it has limitations.

As noted, chords are identical irrespective of octave, which is a limitation of tabs and song sheets. For example, the Queen song Crazy Little Thing Called Love has an ascending chord run of B, C, D... which in the the basic (aka, first) position doesn't exactly go up in tone, but it works GREAT if you use the Bb shape (3211), and move it from your index finger covering the two strings closest to the floor to fret 2 as the B (4322), up to the C on fret 3 (5433), and the D on fret 4 (6544). This may sound like gibberish as you read it, but try it on your uke and you'll hear EXACTLY what I mean.

I also mention this because the first flaw I found with UkeBuddy was no Bb. None. 🤣 It only said A#. Now, it turns out that those are the same thing, but the name depends on the key of the song as a whole. That gets into some aspects of music theory that may not be helpful yet, but digging deeper, UkeBuddy was originally missing the entire key of B!!!! It has since been added, but there's that additional issue that it doesn't know the context of the chord you're asking about.

I'd call your chord a GSus2 because it's one-finger away from a G chord. But, if you're playing with D's and want a fun alternate to spice things up, it could be a DSus4.

What a great example! Both of these are among my favorite chords....not shocking since they're EXACTLY THE SAME FINGERING...but the two chords that to ME are most conducive to what I call "add a finger, lift a finger" kinds of dancing around are the first position G and D chords and their kin.

That is, what UkeBuddy can't possibly know is if you're lifting up one finger of a G chord or one finger of a D chord. In CONTEXT, the chord name will tend to take on the name of the chord you're modifying. Playing a D chord and lifting a finger? It's a Dsus4 -- it's in The Beatles' You've Got To Hide Your Love Away this way, for example. You bounce between a Dsus4, D, D2, back to D.

Fire and Rain is a song that uses the Gsus2 a LOT, because James is alllllll about the suspended chord sound, and he does a lot of songs in G that also bounce through G-Gsus2-Gsus4 in some order or another, right back-to-back -- but the actual fingering of Gsus2 and Dsus4 are identical.

Anyway, UkeBuddy is still a terrific resource that I use as the time, but it's not THE resource for me it once was.

I prefer:
View attachment 169934
Very user friendly and intuitive. I use the free version.

This one for me too. 🙂 I likewise am fine with the free version.

@BiosphereDecay, these are exactly the right questions to be asking at this point in your journey. We all had 'em along the way, and there's something about the answers that's still a little itchy in my brain all of 2 and a half years down the road for me (a truly wizened expert after two and a half years, me :ROFLMAO: NOT). It's all about context, though, and the song will usually guide you if you can figure out how to let it.
 
It doesn't matter for the chord what octave the G is. That website is very incomplete and can't even identify the rootless D7 which is beloved by many uke players. The 0320 is a simple suspended D so not very common but read up in Wikipedia. For better chord look up use the SmartChord app.
Thanks for the recommendation, seems like there's a lot of useful stuff in that app. The fretboard explorer in particular. I had such a a hard time trying to memorize the note names manually, but after less than 10 minutes with that app, I memorized every note up to the 5th fret. And this definitely seems like a better chord namer. Thanks again!
 
Fire and Rain is a song that uses the Gsus2 a LOT, because James is alllllll about the suspended chord sound, and he does a lot of songs in G that also bounce through G-Gsus2-Gsus4 in some order or another, right back-to-back -- but the actual fingering of Gsus2 and Dsus4 are identical.

Anyway, UkeBuddy is still a terrific resource that I use as the time, but it's not THE resource for me it once was.
Pete Townsend used a lot of Sus chords, as well. Fun stuff to play!

I find the "chord finder" on Uke Buddy useful for discovering those chords. Just put in your standard chord, and play "what if" with it. "Oh, that's not a chord... must be why it sounds like crap!"
 
So I'm writing a song that includes my voice, ocarina, high g soprano, and low G tenor. The ukes both play lead sometimes, and harmonize at times too. The low G is more of a base line, where the high G plays rhythm chords.

I have a spot that starts from 0 on G on the tenor, and 3rd fret of E (also G) on the soprano and ascends in harmony. I have the Dsus(0320) as the opening chord of this harmony. I was going to have the soprano play 0540, but the software I'm using won't let me have 2 of the same note in one chord, even if they're different octaves. It's hard to tell what it really sounds like in the app's playback, because I tried just leaving out the open A, and it doesn't have the lift I was hoping for. I could always just let the sheet music show the chord incomplete and remember to do it with both A's... Or I'm wondering what chords you guys would pick in this situation.

tl;dr
What chord would you have a high g play in harmony with a low G that's playing Dsus(0320)?
 
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It is customary to note the chords from 4th to 1st string, so a Gsus2 would be 0230, rather than 0320.
I agree. It is also consistent with the order of strings from the viewpoint of the player.
 
I agree. It is also consistent with the order of strings from the viewpoint of the player.
I mean if that's what everyone else does, I'll do it that way too, but I thought it made more sense to go from 1st string to 4th.

We're kinda getting distracted though.
I was trying to hear people's opinions on what chords harmonize best with Gsus2.
 
Your tab example shows 0230 and chord diagrams follow the same string order as tabs. Your questions about use of suspended chords should probably be under different heading and not in the beginners forum.
 
Your tab example shows 0230 and chord diagrams follow the same string order as tabs. Your questions about use of suspended chords should probably be under different heading and not in the beginners forum.
Fair enough. I'll make a thread in uke talk.
 
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