Classical Ukulele Players Challenge!

Since this has a Uke instrumental included, I will share this as an example of multi tracking with video.


I miss hearing the Scottish pipe bands that were so prevalent during the first 40 years of my life in Nova Scotia. So, thank you, Tom. Your video THRILLED me to bits, and stirred my soul!
 
Here is an Elizabethan lute piece by composer/lutanist Thomas Robinson, a contemporary of John Dowland.
I was having trouble playing it solo, so I made a virtue out of necessity and split the parts into two. I like the sound of the ukulele on these early pieces, it seems to capture the mood quite well.


Really beautiful
 
Thank you! You are very kind!

This one has 3 separate snare drum tracks, recorded on an electronic drum kit I no longer have. The drone effect was a track featuring one note from the Uke played rapidly through the whole piece, then reverbed and delayed to death.

This was for the seasons a few years ago. Drums are my main instrument, but I hardly play anymore.

No video footage, just slides. I hadn’t figured out synching video at this point.

I do love the pipe band style of snare drumming, though!

A soprano longneck is not quite the same as a set of pipes, however. 🙂


I really like it a lot (and I'm a little off topic, but now I think I understand the origin of the sound of Palmer's drums in Picture at an Exhibition)
 
I really like it a lot (and I'm a little off topic, but now I think I understand the origin of the sound of Palmer's drums in Picture at an Exhibition)
Oh??? Please elaborate if you can, I’m not quite making the same connection… but would be very curious about that (as an obsessive ELP fan here).
 
Oh??? Please elaborate if you can, I’m not quite making the same connection… but would be very curious about that (as an obsessive ELP fan here).
Maybe I'm wrong, but I was referring to a way of playing in which the drums (more than or in addition to providing a rhythmic ostinato) double the melodic parts, embellishing them with rolls, timbral changes (e.g. ELP - Promenade Part 3 Live in Newcastle) and in this case also (rhythmic) counterpoint lines
 
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Since this has a Uke instrumental included, I will share this as an example of multi tracking with video.


This is great! Were you using a metronome at some point in the process? I find that I have to do that when multi-tracking.
 
I miss hearing the Scottish pipe bands that were so prevalent during the first 40 years of my life in Nova Scotia. So, thank you, Tom. Your video THRILLED me to bits, and stirred my soul!
Thank you! I’m grateful for your response.

I miss drumming with a pipe band. It is amazing music, and the drum parts can be wonderfully intricate and subtle.

If my health and family circumstances change for the better, I may give it a go again.

🙂
 
Maybe I'm wrong, but I was referring to a way of playing in which the drums (more than or in addition to providing a rhythmic ostinato) double the melodic parts, embellishing them with rolls, timbral changes (e.g. ELP - Promenade Part 3 Live in Newcastle) and in this case also (rhythmic) counterpoint lines
I getcha. Yes, makes sense. CP is always such a very “musical“ percussionist, as well as a kickass drummer.
 
I did this for Seasons but it fits here. This is my interpretation of the traditional French tune Horses Branle (Branle des Chevaux, Horse's Bransle, etc) which had its first known publication in 1589 in Orchesographie by Thoinot Arbeau. Rhythms and ornamentation are influenced by later versions but I have taken it back to the earlier modal form. It is often played with the A & B parts in a standard major scale but this is in mixolydian with the C part in dorian with the leading note only raised on the second last note. I decided to just go with a drone bass.

 
I did this for Seasons but it fits here. This is my interpretation of the traditional French tune Horses Branle (Branle des Chevaux, Horse's Bransle, etc) which had its first known publication in 1589 in Orchesographie by Thoinot Arbeau. Rhythms and ornamentation are influenced by later versions but I have taken it back to the earlier modal form. It is often played with the A & B parts in a standard major scale but this is in mixolydian with the C part in dorian with the leading note only raised on the second last note. I decided to just go with a drone bass.


Very nice! Excellent performance!
 
I went with six strings this time. Yamaha CG172SF through a KNA NG 1 pickup into GarageBand on my iPad.


A lovely tune, and beautifully played, Tom. I confess I was startled at first by how extraordinarily large your guitar looked, given the diminutive sized instruments we’re used to seeing on this thread. :) But your Yamaha sounds glorious and was a good choice for the Sor piece.
 
A lovely tune, and beautifully played, Tom. I confess I was startled at first by how extraordinarily large your guitar looked, given the diminutive sized instruments we’re used to seeing on this thread. :) But your Yamaha sounds glorious and was a good choice for the Sor piece.
Thank you!

Amie did mention that guitars were welcome on this thread. But I will try not to overdo it. 🙂
 
I went with six strings this time. Yamaha CG172SF through a KNA NG 1 pickup into GarageBand on my iPad.


Love this little piece. A very thoughtful and sensitive rendering. (This must be Sor's original version where it dips down into the lower strings, unlike the uke arrangement?)
 
Love this little piece. A very thoughtful and sensitive rendering. (This must be Sor's original version where it dips down into the lower strings, unlike the uke arrangement?)
Thank you!

Yes, this is the guitar arrangement, which is the original version, as far as I know.

It could theoretically be played an octave higher on a low G Uke.

One would have to go very high up the neck on a re entrant Uke to fit this piece without changing some of the octaves.

But displacing octaves is part of arranging, and the baroque guitar is kind of famous for that, or at least to our ears it sounds like things are displaced by an octave at times.

I do enjoy the ukulele versions of this piece!
 
I did this for Seasons but it fits here. This is my interpretation of the traditional French tune Horses Branle (Branle des Chevaux, Horse's Bransle, etc) which had its first known publication in 1589 in Orchesographie by Thoinot Arbeau. Rhythms and ornamentation are influenced by later versions but I have taken it back to the earlier modal form. It is often played with the A & B parts in a standard major scale but this is in mixolydian with the C part in dorian with the leading note only raised on the second last note. I decided to just go with a drone bass.


Beautiful
 
Here's a nice piece written by Francisco Tarrega (1852 - 1909) a well known Spanish Composer and guitar player from the Romantic period.
This prelude is just one, of many, beautiful pieces composed by Tarrega.

 

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