Classical Ukulele Players Challenge!

Here is my arrangement of Greensleeves (16th century English folk song) for low G ukulele. If you find some odd sounding chords, that's my fault. 😀 I hope you still enjoy the result.


Great, @robag! Such a lovely, inventive, and graceful arrangement. I love all the ornaments.(y)
 
Here is my arrangement of Greensleeves (16th century English folk song) for low G ukulele. If you find some odd sounding chords, that's my fault. 😀 I hope you still enjoy the result.


Gabor! That was beautiful! I love all of the ornamentations you brought in there. That was really nice, thank you for sharing (even your advertised flub didn't sound flubby, it sounded like just another variation on a theme).
 
I was at my music lesson yesterday and Doug noticed that I was playing as if I should be using a plectrum, and asked if I wanted to try that. Sadly, I cannot do so for very long: I have a very old injury to my right-hand thumb tendon that gets aggravated with that kind of tool-use (I can't do embroidery any more for similar reason). Doug introduced a technique of strum where I hold my hand as if I am holding a plectrum and strike with my index fingernail for the strum, while muting the first string with my ring finger (when it wants muting). This is definitely a patting your head and rubbing your tummy sort of thing for me, so that's going to take some doing. Once I've managed to coordinate it a little more, I'll post a WIP (work in progress) recording of that kind of strum. We'll see if I'm able to maintain the physical geometry of this and not have it bother my thumb. If I don't hold a lot of tension between the thumb and forefinger, it should be ok.

On a side note... I'd been practising one of the Renaisssance pieces from Putter (can't remember which, I'll have to look at my music when I've got a chance) with a pull off to be a little quicker off the mark as it were, and he said that pull offs and hammers-on were a much more modern invention than the Renaissance. He wasn't stopping me from doing it if I wanted to, he was just pointing out that it wasn't as authentic, and was encouraging me to try the picking version for the smoother, gentler transition that it provides.
 
Loving this thread so far, Amie! I'm inspired to get to work on some pieces I've had my eyes on for a while and perhaps some get back to some guilele/ classical guitar pieces that I've started and stalled. As a prime example, here's an IG post of mine from 2yrs ago, almost to the day!

It's called "Eterna Saudade" by Dilermando Reis. I came across it when I was searching for my classical guitar and watching a buncha videos from Guitar Salon International (deep rabbit hole). The IG post is slide-able, with me trying it out on three different instruments (third version is a uke).

 
Loving this thread so far, Amie! I'm inspired to get to work on some pieces I've had my eyes on for a while and perhaps some get back to some guilele/ classical guitar pieces that I've started and stalled. As a prime example, here's an IG post of mine from 2yrs ago, almost to the day!

It's called "Eterna Saudade" by Dilermando Reis. I came across it when I was searching for my classical guitar and watching a buncha videos from Guitar Salon International (deep rabbit hole). The IG post is slide-able, with me trying it out on three different instruments (third version is a uke).


This is so cool! I love it when you play something on a bunch of different instruments, is so interesting comparing the different voices.
 
On a side note... I'd been practising one of the Renaisssance pieces from Putter (can't remember which, I'll have to look at my music when I've got a chance) with a pull off to be a little quicker off the mark as it were, and he said that pull offs and hammers-on were a much more modern invention than the Renaissance. He wasn't stopping me from doing it if I wanted to, he was just pointing out that it wasn't as authentic, and was encouraging me to try the picking version for the smoother, gentler transition that it provides.
I’d wondered what book that was but then discovered Putter’s web site here: https://sites.google.com/site/tabs4ukes/pdf-books
Apparently free to use but donations welcome, Putter is a member here.
 
I’d wondered what book that was but then discovered Putter’s web site here: https://sites.google.com/site/tabs4ukes/pdf-books
Apparently free to use but donations welcome, Putter is a member here.
Sorry I had linked to Putter's original thread before and didn't think to this time.

 
Here is my arrangement of Greensleeves (16th century English folk song) for low G ukulele. If you find some odd sounding chords, that's my fault. 😀 I hope you still enjoy the result.


A really lovely arrangement, and great playing!
 
Thank you for starting this Classical Ukulele Players Challenge, Amie. I chose to undertake Minuet In G, from R. J. Putter's collection. In the spirit of the challenge, I'm posting my work in progress.


It sounds like your work-in-progress is pretty close to completion. That was excellent! 👏
 
Love this thread, thanks Amie.
I thought about playing one of the most famous pieces of the classical guitar repertoire, on the ukulele.
The song is by Narciso Yepes and is titled Jeux Interdits.
Even though I used the low G strings, I still feel the lack of bass but I think that in the end the result is pleasant.
I would then like to know your impressions please 😊
Thanks, greetings everyone

View attachment Jeux Interdits.wav
 
I’d wondered what book that was but then discovered Putter’s web site here: https://sites.google.com/site/tabs4ukes/pdf-books
Apparently free to use but donations welcome, Putter is a member here.
I'm enjoying all the music posted so far and thank you all for sharing.

And thanks to Putter for various tabs shared over the years. I have a number of them stashed away on my computer, (lots of non-classical tabs from Putter, too), and am glad to have them.
 
Love this thread, thanks Amie.
I thought about playing one of the most famous pieces of the classical guitar repertoire, on the ukulele.
The song is by Narciso Yepes and is titled Jeux Interdits.
Even though I used the low G strings, I still feel the lack of bass but I think that in the end the result is pleasant.
I would then like to know your impressions please 😊
Thanks, greetings everyone

View attachment 165096
Sounds beautiful to me. Light and airy.
 
Love this thread, thanks Amie.
I thought about playing one of the most famous pieces of the classical guitar repertoire, on the ukulele.
The song is by Narciso Yepes and is titled Jeux Interdits.
Even though I used the low G strings, I still feel the lack of bass but I think that in the end the result is pleasant.
I would then like to know your impressions please 😊
Thanks, greetings everyone

View attachment 165096
This is a gorgeous interpretation of this piece. Beautiful. Thank you so much for sharing.
 
I am thrilled that you have started this thread, Aime! I love the music from the desingnatied time period. Owing to my newbie status as a player, including having just received my own ukuele, my participation is limited to throughly enjoying all the sumissions which have been great and inspirational!
 
I am thrilled that you have started this thread, Aime! I love the music from the desingnatied time period. Owing to my newbie status as a player, including having just received my own ukuele, my participation is limited to throughly enjoying all the sumissions which have been great and inspirational!
We will happily look forward to when you feel confident enough to share your first efforts. And remember: they can be very simple, and very work-in-progress. We don't need perfection. But whenever you're ready, you are very welcome to participate. In the meantime, a cheering section is definitely always appreciated.

I'm glad that so many people are enjoying this thread as much (at least!) as I am. This has been fantastic, I am delighted with the responses. Thank you, all!
 
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