Compact Go Bar Deck

Bradford

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My shop is only 8' x 20' so space is at a premium. The standard size go bar deck that I had been using was a pain to store and the wooden sticks were either breaking or the wrong length, so I came up with this idea. By using springs on wood dowels, I was able to drop the height of the deck by over 10 inches. They provide plenty of clamping pressure and for what two of the Stew Mac fiberglass bars cost, I was able to make 18 of mine.

Brad
 

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Good idea ..i like it, it's an improvement.
I've just been experimenting with one , and i don't like e'm..it's like working with an unexploded bomb..one stick prangs off in the wrong direction and the whole set up collapses...and you have to be careful in what order you clamp or you snag yourself in...I think I will go for the Vacuum method instead...or clamping, like the Pete Howlett rig.
 
Hi, was wondering if you switched to vacuum and if you have some suggestions? I actually already use vacuum for gluing the bridge so extended it to bracing, side lamination etc seems like an obvious choice?
 
Hi, was wondering if you switched to vacuum and if you have some suggestions? I actually already use vacuum for gluing the bridge so extended it to bracing, side lamination etc seems like an obvious choice?
No I went for the Cam Clamps method in the end …simple to use and takes up hardly any space… I just hang the jig on the wall.


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thanks for taking the time and makes a lot of sense especially if you don't change bracing designs frequently. really appreciate it!!!!
 
Spring loaded go-bars completely solve the problem of flying sticks. I used wood sticks for a long time, and also tried fibreglas rods. Both junk iMO! My bars are made with PVC, wood dowels, and springs. They are basically copies of bars that Romanillos taught me to make in Spain. Easy to make, use, and they adjust to any bracing pattern. My guitar and uke decks are all the same height, 20". The uke decks have a 12" x 16" footprint and they easily stack 4 high in a corner. Guitar decks are bigger and heavier, so I usually only stack them 2 high. 2 slightly different lengths of bars will do all the bracing in a guitar or uke. Put the decks on a lazy Susan on your bench and cleanup is a breeze.
 

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Spring loaded go-bars completely solve the problem of flying sticks. I used wood sticks for a long time, and also tried fibreglas rods. Both junk iMO! My bars are made with PVC, wood dowels, and springs. They are basically copies of bars that Romanillos taught me to make in Spain. Easy to make, use, and they adjust to any bracing pattern. My guitar and uke decks are all the same height, 20". The uke decks have a 12" x 16" footprint and they easily stack 4 high in a corner. Guitar decks are bigger and heavier, so I usually only stack them 2 high. 2 slightly different lengths of bars will do all the bracing in a guitar or uke. Put the decks on a lazy Susan on your bench angle lcleanup is a breeze.
I made the spring loaded bars long so that they go against the ceiling. No go-bar deck at all to store, and any place on the bench can be a clamping area. Very convenient and portable.
 
Lets see, I would have to use bars 10' to 12' long. Using the ceiling sounds interesting, but I think portable decks are better for me.
 
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