Concert Fluke, Tenor Fluke, or Outdoor Carbon Tenor?

I’ve owned a tenor fluke for about 13 years. laminate top, plastic fretboard. It came with friction tuners to keep cost down……..in first month, I purchased the Pegheds and installed them myself , no problem. Doing it again, I’d order pegheds and wooden fretboard from factory. It’s sounds great with Aquila Reds , low G. I may drop off for wooden fretboard upgrade on way to Florida this year.

I’ve played outdoor tenor. It plays nice, but Fluke is louder. I found outdoor a little quiet. It is a nice tenor for what it’s intended purpose is. I like the robustness of my Fluke. I’ve left it out for 13 years. No issue. In fact, it just seems to sound better each year and I’ve read that is because the laminate hoop pine top keeps drying out??

There is a big difference in price. Both are worth their asking price. I’d love to play a solid top Koa and Spruce. I’m looking for a used Fluke now with Wooden fretboard and pegheds.……..solid top would be nice but would not hesitate for another laminate.

Good Luck.

Thanks for the direct comparison between the outdoor tenor and the fluke laminate! I thought the Flea soprano laminate I had was excellent. The only problem really is trying to decide if I want a concert Flea, concert Fluke, or a tenor Fluke at this point. And then of course choosing between laminate, koa, and spruce.
 
Apart from the price, and the sound, the biggest difference is how you can use them.

Outdoor Ukuleles are made for the outdoors. If your travels are not taking you into outdoor adventures, the MFC products will always be better in the choice discussed in this thread. If you travels are taking you into hotels and hire cars and buses and trains, you will not notice the increased cost of the MFC product after the first adventure. If your travels are taking you into remote camping grounds and trails and tents, the OU is the only choice.

I have two fleas. One with plastic fretboard and friction tuners and one with a wood fretboard, koa top, pegheds and hard case. The wooden fretboard and pegheds and koa are worth getting if you can afford them. The friction tuners are not a problem, if you learn how to adjust them and carry a small screwdriver so you can adjust them as required. If they are loose or over tight they are a continual annoyance, so you need to learn to do the very simple task of turning the screw 1/8 turn to adjust the tension, then they are like butter. You may need to put the screwdriver into your checked suitcase when you get on an aeroplane, but you should be carrying a little tool kit when you travel.

I also have an OU soprano, which I have taken on several outdoor adventures. It is great to have a uke that you can hang on a tree so it does not take up space in a bivy bag or tent, even if it raining. Or to be able to strap it on top of the luggage, without a cover, on a bicycle or motorbike so it ready to play at the coffee break. Or just slung over your back, even if it is raining. But, it is not an indoors uke, you can take a nicer uke if you stay in a hotel.

Thank you, your analysis makes sense to me. I am mostly going to be in cities and not outdoors, so the MFC instruments are definitely what I'm leaning towards.
 
Hers's a link to a thread about a Grover 2 improvement mod, I did it to my tenor Fluke.

 
My take on concert vrs tenor Fluke is simply the difference in scale length. The body is the same. That said, a respected UU contributor once mention he thought the concert had the perfect tension for a fluke. I tune my fluke down half step to F# and like Aquila REDs on mine. I love the low G souns best but stillI love the high G sound. I’ve never played a concert so I can’t verify Difference. I also, put concert REDS on my tenor Fluke and tension is great. If I go out and play with others, I simply tune up half a step to join in!
 
That's why I chose to keep the the soprano over the concert... a scale mid way b/w soprano and concert vs. slightly longer than concert. It may be someone different or not, but I've seen it written here that concert sounds best among the fleas.
 
Doing it again, I’d order pegheds and wooden fretboard from factory.

Hmmm... here is the problem with the Flukes... they look like a bargain, until you start adding in the extras...

The base model Flutes are $279 (S) or $299 (T), which is reasonable for such a good sounding and durable ukulele.

However: If you start adding the options in (geared tuners, side markers(!), deluxe hardwood fretboard, players sound port, and add a case, the total price rises to over $600. Way outside of my price range!

And: Add a pickup system and their proprietary strap, and you go over $800!!!

Not exactly a bargain anymore...
 
I tune my fluke down half step to F# and like Aquila REDs on mine.
I had these on mine... actually the AGXAQ's with the red low G... but the drop G string snapped after a couple of months, while sitting in the case.. right above the fifth fret.

Made me feel unhappy about the durability of these strings.

There have been some posts here on UU about these strings having been reformulated and being improved over time, and that the later versions are better... and also I've read how they are supposed to be "broken in" using a process that takes days... and that if one snaps it's because of my ukulele having a sharp nut or fret (on a Fluke? It's all plastic!)... and so forth.

People seem to really love or hate these Reds... put me in the "unhappy with their performance" category...

And the whole break in process? High maintenance!

Plus: They cost $12 a set...

Not for me!
 
Hmmm... here is the problem with the Flukes... they look like a bargain, until you start adding in the extras...
I've tried to buy a Fluke (or Flea) several times, and I'd probably have bought and been happy with a base level Flea, but the incremental cost of each extra seemed worth it until the overall cost was way out of budget. Similarly, the customizability is great for new but hard on the used market. I've never seen a used Flea at enough of a discount to overcome somebody else's taste in the pattern, and then when I go to pick one to my taste I nickel and dime it up out of what I'm willing to spend. Definitely a first world problem :)

For me, the Outdoor solved for my scenario better: safe to leave in the car at a price I was willing to leave in the car. The Fluke might meet the first qualification, but it fails the second. I also have a carbon fiber uke, which greatly fails the second. YMMV.
 
I've tried to buy a Fluke (or Flea) several times, and I'd probably have bought and been happy with a base level Flea, but the incremental cost of each extra seemed worth it until the overall cost was way out of budget. Similarly, the customizability is great for new but hard on the used market. I've never seen a used Flea at enough of a discount to overcome somebody else's taste in the pattern, and then when I go to pick one to my taste I nickel and dime it up out of what I'm willing to spend. Definitely a first world problem :)

For me, the Outdoor solved for my scenario better: safe to leave in the car at a price I was willing to leave in the car. The Fluke might meet the first qualification, but it fails the second. I also have a carbon fiber uke, which greatly fails the second. YMMV.

The Flukes and Fleas are definitely expensive, but I do like that the money is going to support people making stuff locally and using local suppliers.

I agree the Outdoor also is made locally and definitely more durable! I'm more of a guitar player though so this would really be my only uke for now.
 
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