Cuticle Twang

LorenFL

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I think I've just created a term.

This might not happen so much if you use a traditional ukulele index finger strum. But, if you're like me and strum with your thumb... maybe?

I've been growing my thumbnail out to a medium length for some time now. As I get used to it being there, it gets a little longer. It is what it is, and I guess it gives me a little more volume and variety to my tone. Someday, I might learn to pick with it. (for now, I prefer to pick with a soft rubber plectrum)

But, if you thumb strum, have you ever had that hard cuticle next to your thumbnail catch on the G string? Twang!

Ugh! I have to trim that cuticle back a little bit every couple weeks. Now, I can get back to playing.

I knew you guys would understand.
 
I think I've just created a term ... if you thumb strum, have you ever had that hard cuticle next to your thumbnail catch on the G string? Twang!
Yes, the hard callus right at the lower corner of the thumbnail does catch the strings, especially the 4th.

<edit> This just came to mind: maybe a few scrubs with pumice would smooth it to reduce "Cuticle Twang."
 
I just cut it back with a good set of nail clippers. I added a nice glass nail file to the pile of stuff I keep next to my living room chair. I really don't want to add pumice stone to the collection!
 
The pumice stone is excellent. I bought one 20 years ago and still have it and use it. I lift kettlebells and that creates callouses like crazy. But I pumice the callouses flat lest they get snagged by a kettlebell and rip off. Then I couldn't train for a few 'til the flesh wound healed.
 
The pumice stone is excellent. I bought one 20 years ago and still have it and use it. I lift kettlebells and that creates callouses like crazy. But I pumice the callouses flat lest they get snagged by a kettlebell and rip off. Then I couldn't train for a few 'til the flesh wound healed.
Ouch.
 
It isn't as bad as it sounds. No, wait; it is as bad as it sounds. I meant that it doesn't happen as frequently as it sounds. It usually happens at competitions when the ego takes over. When training at home, if a beginner feels a "hot spot" on the palm, then they back off before something bad happens.
 
Yes, many of us sympathize with this "development"... I need to trim mine too, and I also sand down my calluses with: Sandpaper!

I was a woodworker in my previous life, so I keep small pieces of 220g sandpaper in my garage for this... the tip of my thumb needs steady attention also. I have too much skin there!

Not sure where ripock used to work... where do you get pumice? I know it's an ingredient in dishwasher detergent...

Maybe he was a volcanologist in his previous life?
 
Yes, many of us sympathize with this "development"... I need to trim mine too, and I also sand down my calluses with: Sandpaper!

I was a woodworker in my previous life, so I keep small pieces of 220g sandpaper in my garage for this... the tip of my thumb needs steady attention also. I have too much skin there!

Not sure where ripock used to work... where do you get pumice? I know it's an ingredient in dishwasher detergent...

Maybe he was a volcanologist in his previous life?
Oh my goodness! It has been over 20 years since I bought my pumice stone. I imagine I just got it from Amazon. It is just a rectangular piece of stone about as big as a pack of Dentyne gum. Probably I purchased it on the recommendation of a coach when I first started training. I like it because it is one purchase for a lifetime. On my kettlebells themselves I used to use a low-grit sandpaper to abrade the oxidation and the burrs which develop on the handles over time. However, I now use a stainless steel brush attachment for a drill which works more quickly and never needs replacement.
 
Why don’tcha just wear gloves, ripock? That’s what I did when I was liftin’.
It is 110% a cultural thing. In the world of gireviks, if you wear gloves you are not legit, you have bad technique, you don't have intestinal fortitude, and you haven't paid your dues. Plus, in competitions you cannot wear gloves so that it will mess you up if you train with gloves and then cannot compete without them. I unabashedly admit it is a total frat boy kind of thing that I've bought into and which I thrived in. But it is kind of like a litmus test which gains you entrance to a brotherhood. It is understandable on a social level, but I admit that you're right. Having callouses under each of the four fingers--even the elusive 4th callous under the pinky is a shibboleth into this very sub sub-culture.
 
In Hawaii Lava in the living room could be a definite problem.
 
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