Does this drive anyone else nuts?

mikelz777

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You're browsing for ukes and admiring the lovely woodgrain until you see the back of the uke and find that the relatively straight grain is not vertical with the center line of the back but rather at a 5-10 degree angle. Maybe it's just me but when I see that I find it so off-putting and it's an immediate deal breaker. I know it would bug me and I wouldn't be happy with it. I ask myself why they couldn't just move the pattern a small little bit and then cut it so the grain is straight up and down with the center line of the back? Has anyone else noticed this and if so, does it bother you?

example:
slant grain 2.jpg
 
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Yes, I have noticed it. No, it doesn't bother me - provided it is no 'worse' than the example you give. I'm more bothered by designs and constructions that are obsessively neat and orderly. So much in the world is bilaterally symmetrical, or repeated in some way. It's good to vary things.

I like the way trees grow. They give the overall impression of being symmetrical, but there is a pleasing randomness about them.
 
The sample you show would bother me. I had a custom mini bass guitar made in 2014 styled like a Fender Telecaster guitar and a natural finish. The builder used poplar but didn't match the pieces that made up the body. I continually bothered me until I decided a couple of years ago to have it painted a solid Fender Capri orange. Doesn't bother me anymore.

Michael Kohan in Los Angeles, Beverly Grove near the Beverly Center
8 tenor cutaway ukes, 4 acoustic bass ukes, 12 solid body bass ukes, 16 mini electric bass guitars (Total: 40)
•Donate to The Ukulele Kids Club, they provide ukuleles to children in hospital music therapy programs. www.theukc.org
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Tele with strap 800.jpg
Tele Capri Orange 900.jpg
 
I’m the opposite. Extremely straight or absolutely perfect bookmatching makes ukes look fake to me and I lose interest immediately. I like the character of more natural-looking materials.
 
Not at all, it would just make it interesting.
 
The sample you show would bother me. I had a custom mini bass guitar made in 2014 styled like a Fender Telecaster guitar and a natural finish. The builder used poplar but didn't match the pieces that made up the body. I continually bothered me until I decided a couple of years ago to have it painted a solid Fender Capri orange. Doesn't bother me anymore.

Michael Kohan in Los Angeles, Beverly Grove near the Beverly Center
8 tenor cutaway ukes, 4 acoustic bass ukes, 12 solid body bass ukes, 16 mini electric bass guitars (Total: 40)
•Donate to The Ukulele Kids Club, they provide ukuleles to children in hospital music therapy programs. www.theukc.org
•Member The CC Strummers: www.youtube.com/user/CCStrummers/video, www.facebook.com/TheCCStrummers


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I'd be in agreement with you there. I like the look of the blonde wood. I'd like the whole body to be one shade or the other but the contrast between the two would be too stark (and non-symmetric) for me and would bug me. I like the solid orange!
 
Its drives me a little more nuts when the wood on the back is more beautiful than the wood on the front. Not really nuts, but confuses me a bit. I assume there must be some mechanical reason the builder put the nicer wood on the back, or else theyd want the nice wood on the front. I dont really know though.
 
Not at all, it would just make it interesting.

I’m the opposite. Extremely straight or absolutely perfect bookmatching makes ukes look fake to me and I lose interest immediately. I like the character of more natural-looking materials.
What I'm seeing is an interesting look in the wood grain because it looks natural, it's a solid back with no break in the continuity of the grain and there's interesting contrast with the light and dark colored bands and the bands vary in width. I rather like the look of the grain, it's the askew angle which ruins it for me.
 
I see this mostly on 1-piece backs, have seen many Ohana ukes like this. Not a deal breaker to me.
That's what this is, an Ohana! I too have seen this a lot in Ohanas. It would seem a curious choice if it is being done intentionally.
 
I think it depends on the level on uke you are looking for/at. A lower priced uke may be considered. Higher priced uke, not so.
I think that is an indicator of overall attention to detail in construction. Unless someone thought they could use something like that as a trademark, and a whole line like that. A deep discount from a quality maker acknowledging it as a blem, maybe a different take.
 
I see this mostly on 1-piece backs, have seen many Ohana ukes like this. Not a deal breaker to me.
We'll yeah, if bookmatched it's got a symmetrical chevron pattern. Ohana with their 1-pc tops and backs is a main culprit.
 
I've never noticed that on any of my ukes, but, yeah it would bug me. I'm the type to center my plate on the placemat and align all my silverware around my plate... :LOL:
 
My Cocobolo Ukulele has a funky woodgrain thing on its top, but not the back. I Guess it just makes it mine.
What would bother me more than that is an ukulele that sounds like sh---.
 
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