Favorite Daily Singing Exercises?

Rosalei

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Hello, I want to develop a better voice and been getting somewhat overwhelmed with all the advice and different methods on YouTube.
Do you have a simple 10-15 minute daily routine you could recommend for a beginner singer?

Sounds like trilling is one of the main exercises that everyone recommends.. what else?

TIA 🌸
 
I think Emily Greenleaf's vocal function exercises, https://emilygreenleaf.com/vocal-function-exercises/, have really helped me. But I started doing them as part of a vocal technique class (taught by someone else), and I think I would not be benefitting as much from the exercises if I hadn't had the in-person instruction first. So if you are able to start with a class or a few sessions with a teacher/coach, I would recommend doing that first!
 
I think Emily Greenleaf's vocal function exercises, https://emilygreenleaf.com/vocal-function-exercises/, have really helped me. But I started doing them as part of a vocal technique class (taught by someone else), and I think I would not be benefitting as much from the exercises if I hadn't had the in-person instruction first. So if you are able to start with a class or a few sessions with a teacher/coach, I would recommend doing that first!
This is great. Thank you for the link, it's nice and simple, exactly what I was looking for 😊🙏🌸
I will probably take sessions with a coach in the future, but for now this will help get me in the groove a bit.
 
I think Emily Greenleaf's vocal function exercises, https://emilygreenleaf.com/vocal-function-exercises/, have really helped me. But I started doing them as part of a vocal technique class (taught by someone else), and I think I would not be benefitting as much from the exercises if I hadn't had the in-person instruction first. So if you are able to start with a class or a few sessions with a teacher/coach, I would recommend doing that first!
These are really cool, thank you!
 
Hi! I'm a voice teacher. I use lip trills with students just to get their motors running, mostly to engage the breathing muscles, steady their breath flow, and loosen some facial muscles. Simple scales are incredibly effective in exercising and training the voice. Youtube videos can be marginally helpful, but extremely limiting. Even if you only take 1 month of individual and preferably in-person lessons with a voice teacher, you'll have a better idea of how to approach singing and developing your voice. Similarly, taking group voice classes is a good start, but will be much more limiting than private lessons. Good luck on your journey!
 
Hi! I'm a voice teacher. I use lip trills with students just to get their motors running, mostly to engage the breathing muscles, steady their breath flow, and loosen some facial muscles. Simple scales are incredibly effective in exercising and training the voice. Youtube videos can be marginally helpful, but extremely limiting. Even if you only take 1 month of individual and preferably in-person lessons with a voice teacher, you'll have a better idea of how to approach singing and developing your voice. Similarly, taking group voice classes is a good start, but will be much more limiting than private lessons. Good luck on your journey!
Thank you so much 🙏 💓 since posting this I took a lesson with a local musician and he gave me a great set of daily scale exercises, but didn't suggest lip trills, so I will add that to the start of my practice.
I can see the value of in-person lessons with this. I'll probably do more once I've got my routine more established. Thank you for the tips and encouragement 🌸
 
I was curious:

"Breathe in through your nose and when you breathe out vibrate your lips together with some sound, like a telephone ringing. Choose a pitch which is comfortable for you. Keep the pitch monotonous and do not vary it by going higher or lower. Make the sound 'brrrrrrrr' by vibrating the lips, like a telephone ringing."

From the description, I can't figure out how to do it. When I try, I sound like a horse exhaling a deep breath.
"This is known in the horse world as "High Blowing" and usually refers to vibration of the nostril or false nostril during exhalation."

Or, is it like the sound of a chair skidding across a hardwood floor?

I am a marginally good player, but an intermittantly acceptable singer. My Range is at best low A to high B. I want it to be low G to high D if possible, like "Tennesee Waltz" in G. Not a lot to ask, is it?
 
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@Rosalei, I should clarify that lip trills are fine, but only a tiny piece of the puzzle, and that simple scales on an "ah" vowel are much more effective (when done right). There's a lot more detail than I care to get into in writing, but "when done right" suggests that you only use the minimum movement needed to achieve your notes (Proper adduction, or closure, of your vocal folds and subsequent stretching of the vocal folds to achieve different notes, but no reaching with your facial muscles or head/neck movements).

@Wiggy, you can totally stretch your range. My short and generalized advice is to keep exercising your voice everyday by extending your scale singing little by little and in front of a mirror so that you can make sure you are not visibly reaching for any notes. Facial/head/neck movements are unnecessary and get in the way of what actually needs to happen, which is training the tiny muscles that control the ligaments and muscles surrounding your vocal folds. Your description of your lip trills:
I sound like a horse exhaling a deep breath
... sounds correct. It sounds like that only because you are doing the action but need to add the vocalizing or phonation to the gesture. In other words, you are buzzing/trilling the lips and now you need to add some vocal sounds to it.

Hope I'm making sense. It's much easier to speak and demonstrate than try to type everything out while I'm eating my lunch :LOL:. My training is in classical voice, so my teaching is much about efficient healthy vocal production and quiet calm breaths, regardless of the style of singing or music.
 
@Rosalei, I should clarify that lip trills are fine, but only a tiny piece of the puzzle, and that simple scales on an "ah" vowel are much more effective (when done right). There's a lot more detail than I care to get into in writing, but "when done right" suggests that you only use the minimum movement needed to achieve your notes (Proper adduction, or closure, of your vocal folds and subsequent stretching of the vocal folds to achieve different notes, but no reaching with your facial muscles or head/neck movements).

@Wiggy, you can totally stretch your range. My short and generalized advice is to keep exercising your voice everyday by extending your scale singing little by little and in front of a mirror so that you can make sure you are not visibly reaching for any notes. Facial/head/neck movements are unnecessary and get in the way of what actually needs to happen, which is training the tiny muscles that control the ligaments and muscles surrounding your vocal folds. Your description of your lip trills:

... sounds correct. It sounds like that only because you are doing the action but need to add the vocalizing or phonation to the gesture. In other words, you are buzzing/trilling the lips and now you need to add some vocal sounds to it.

Hope I'm making sense. It's much easier to speak and demonstrate than try to type everything out while I'm eating my lunch :LOL:. My training is in classical voice, so my teaching is much about efficient healthy vocal production and quiet calm breaths, regardless of the style of singing or music.
I try very hard to not slip into falsetto, the transition is not pretty. I do need to practice exhaling a low G. A solid G with glissando clear up to D would make me a star!

Is trilling like what you would when blowing into a brass instrument mouthpiece?
(Yes, trying to do that when eating lunch could be messy...)
 
This is doable:



Do listen to the whole thing. But those like me, who can't wait to see and hear how to do the exercises, jump to at 3:55.

(These may be sounds common in non-English languages... there are more vowels than a,e,i,o,u, and sometimes y.)
 
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@Rosalei, I should clarify that lip trills are fine, but only a tiny piece of the puzzle, and that simple scales on an "ah" vowel are much more effective (when done right). There's a lot more detail than I care to get into in writing, but "when done right" suggests that you only use the minimum movement needed to achieve your notes (Proper adduction, or closure, of your vocal folds and subsequent stretching of the vocal folds to achieve different notes, but no reaching with your facial muscles or head/neck movements).
Thank you. This is great, to learn about minimum movement, and using "ah". The instructor I saw switched from "ah" to "ee" and "he-haw" but I have no idea why.
He talked about always dropping the jaw, but my other instructor years ago told me to open my mouth as wide as possible. What do you recommend ?
 
Haha, once again, I am replying while eating lunch.

@Wiggy, Here's lip trilling (starts around 1:20):

Ignore the stuff about pulling up on your face with your hands unless you're really having trouble getting the lips to trill/buzz.
The embouchure needed for playing brass instruments is a bit tighter than this.

@Rosalei, all of the vowels are important to exercise, but "ah" is a great starting point of reference since it is the most neutral w/ relation to muscles, tongue position, lip position, and vocal balance. OMG, please do not open your mouth as wide as possible. I'm sure that instructor meant well, or maybe that was just a stretching thing. The jaw should just be relaxed or hanging from the "hinge" by your ears. A lot of folks come in to lessons singing w/ their mouths barely open, which is why your teacher advised you to drop the jaw. Using a mirror during practice will reveal a lot of things you might not be aware that you are doing. It's an important practice tool!

My teaching style has evolved over the years to include explaining the what/why of my singing exercises because, hey knowledge is power, and I want my students to understand what I'm trying to get them to do so that I don't have to keep making corrections, haha. If you want to know, I think you should feel free to ask your teacher the what/why on occassion.
 
Haha, once again, I am replying while eating lunch.

@Wiggy, Here's lip trilling (starts around 1:20):

Ignore the stuff about pulling up on your face with your hands unless you're really having trouble getting the lips to trill/buzz.
The embouchure needed for playing brass instruments is a bit tighter than this.

@Rosalei, all of the vowels are important to exercise, but "ah" is a great starting point of reference since it is the most neutral w/ relation to muscles, tongue position, lip position, and vocal balance. OMG, please do not open your mouth as wide as possible. I'm sure that instructor meant well, or maybe that was just a stretching thing. The jaw should just be relaxed or hanging from the "hinge" by your ears. A lot of folks come in to lessons singing w/ their mouths barely open, which is why your teacher advised you to drop the jaw. Using a mirror during practice will reveal a lot of things you might not be aware that you are doing. It's an important practice tool!

My teaching style has evolved over the years to include explaining the what/why of my singing exercises because, hey knowledge is power, and I want my students to understand what I'm trying to get them to do so that I don't have to keep making corrections, haha. If you want to know, I think you should feel free to ask your teacher the what/why on occassion.

Ohhh jeeze, I'm so glad you clarified that about the jaw drop/ wide open mouth! It definitely wasn't my favourite thing to practice so I will be happy to drop that!
Thank you for explaining about the "ah" vowels, and I'll see if i notice anything in the mirrior. I totally agree, understanding the "why" is extremely helpful in learning a new skill 🌸
 
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