Hawaii: Subjugation of the Paradise Kingdom

BigJackBrass

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Many of you will know much this already, but even so I think it's worth a reminder of, or first exposure to, the story of what happened to Hawaii following European and American arrivals:

 
Thanks, very interesting. I know little about the history of Hawaii. I had just read something intrigued by the lyrics of Hawai'i '78.
 
It astonishes me that a group of businessmen—fruit and sugar plantation owners—were able to overthrow a foreign government and the ultimate response from America was basically a shrug.
 
"Ukulele, A History" by Jim Tranquada and John King, is more about how society, politics, and greed affected the uke's birth and increased popularity. The ukulele itself is a very small fraction of the book, and it has very few photos. I got somewhat bored with it, they get a little too scholarly in places, but it's still a good book.

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It astonishes me that a group of businessmen—fruit and sugar plantation owners—were able to overthrow a foreign government and the ultimate response from America was basically a shrug.
Missionaries and Western pandemics also played a role in the weakening of the Kingdom.
 
It astonishes me that a group of businessmen—fruit and sugar plantation owners—were able to overthrow a foreign government and the ultimate response from America was basically a shrug.
They were the principal land owners in the Kingdom of Hawaii at the time.
 
According to Wikipedia, uniformed US Marines, with the support of US Navy battleships and the US ambassador, took part in the insurrection. The US President may not have been involved before the fact, but afterwards his options may have been limited. Realistically, this sort of colonialism (by the US as well as Europe) was going on all over the world during that time period and many of those countries are still suffering from the after effects.
 
"Ukulele, A History" by Jim Tranquada and John King, is more about how society, politics, and greed affected the uke's birth and increased popularity. The ukulele itself is a very small fraction of the book, and it has very few photos. I got somewhat bored with it, they get a little too scholarly in places, but it's still a good book.

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That is a good book. I bought it in digital format and started reading it but then my kindle reader broke down. I guess I'll buy it again printed.
 
Realistically, this sort of colonialism (by the US as well as Europe) was going on all over the world during that time period and many of those countries are still suffering from the after effects.
Indeed. I can't think of a single happy story of colonialism
 
When Emperors/Empires, are so willing to sacrifice and subjugate their own people for the benefit of the 1%, why would anyone expect them to treat the people of foreign lands any better?
 
I'll never forget the story of the song Paoakalani by the last Hawaiian queen, Liliuokalani. She was under house arrest and cutoff from all contact with the outside world, save for the newspapers wrapped around the flowers that she received. Imperialists really need to f_ck off and die. The brits did the same kind of job to my country.
 
According to Wikipedia, uniformed US Marines, with the support of US Navy battleships and the US ambassador, took part in the insurrection. The US President may not have been involved before the fact, but afterwards his options may have been limited. Realistically, this sort of colonialism (by the US as well as Europe) was going on all over the world during that time period and many of those countries are still suffering from the after effects.
West Africa is currently in the process of trying to pry itself from the yoke of French neo-colonialism, where France, and the West in general, take up to 95% of the wealth generated in the area, during to unfair and unfavourable economic agreements and contracts signed in the past by African compradors, which are enforced by the presence of the French Foreign Legion, and American bases.
 
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