Hello from a 76 year old Montana newbie! My name is Susan Westphal

Welcome Sue! If possible I would try those ukes in person. The feel and sound of various brands can be quite different. The only one I have first hand knowledge is the Opio. I have a tenor in low g and like it. I also have a Kanele’a in high g. Each has a different sound and feel. I like both for different things.
My instructor here is Belgrade Mt has a KoAloha Opio concert all solid Acacia KCO-10. I am leaning towards this one but not sure if I need a Concert or Tenor...
 
Welcome, Susan! You two make a very handsome couple, I must say! I had a colleague in the newspaper business named David Westphal, from Iowa. Any relation?

You’ll like it here on UU. Lots of friendly, encouraging, nonjudgmental people willing to share their expertise and advice. Have fun!
Well thank you..no relation that I know of. He is originally from Marshalltown Iowa.
I am happy I found this forum and learning alot from it!
 
Welcome to the UU Forum, Susan. Glad to hear how much fun you’re having on your ukulele journey. I have a KoAloha Opio concert and it’s my uke of choice for group jam sessions. Well built, easy to play, excellent tone, and lots of volume - I can actually hear myself when playing in a large group of people! Just a great all-round workhorse, at a reasonable price.
I am leaning more towards this one! But its a solid Acacia.
 
Welcome to the UU Forum, Susan. Glad to hear how much fun you’re having on your ukulele journey. I have a KoAloha Opio concert and it’s my uke of choice for group jam sessions. Well built, easy to play, excellent tone, and lots of volume - I can actually hear myself when playing in a large group of people! Just a great all-round workhorse, at a reasonable price.
Hi! I am torn between a Koahola concert Opio and an Opio Tenor. I cannot see much difference between them. Seems like the Tenor is a little bit more forgiving with finger placements due to more space between the frets. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
 
Hi! I am torn between a Koahola concert Opio and an Opio Tenor. I cannot see much difference between them. Seems like the Tenor is a little bit more forgiving with finger placements due to more space between the frets. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
I suggest you try to get some playtime in on a tenor ukulele (either at a music store, or perhaps one that belongs to somebody who attends your group/jam sessions. Play songs you already know, ones that you have been playing on your concert ukulele for awhile. That’s the best way to find out if the slightly extra space on a tenor feels better. The extra space can sometimes become a problem. Yes, it provides more area for your fingertips to land on, but that extra space means you could more easily miss the precise spot that the uke needs to be fretted at in order to get a good tone when you strum or pluck the string. Sometimes when we think we need extra space, what we really need is better fretting accuracy. :) Of course, if your fingers feel physically cramped on your concert fretboard, then moving up to a tenor is worth considering. Good luck with the decision, Sue!
 
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Hi Susan, welcome to the UU Forum. I'm a little late tot he party here.

I don't play concerts, so I can't offer advice about pros and cons for that scale.

I believe the Ohana Cynthia Lin Signature uke has a laminate construction. So that will have a different type of sound to it than the solid wood ukes will. Not a bad sound, but different.

I liked the Ko'Aloha Spruce/Acacia Opio tenor I had. But to honest, I preferred the all-mango Rebel tenor I got for about the same money. (Both are made by the same company in Thailand. I think the Rebel was slightly better made and has a more refined sound.

I don't know how petite your hands are, but you may find the tenor neck and frets to be a bit much of a stretch. But there are lots of people with small hands that play guitar, so a tenor uke may not be a problem. Are there any uke clubs in Montana or Florida that you can check out? The players might be willing to let you hold and try their tenors to see if you like the larger scale. Most clubs welcome players of all levels and you'll be surprised at how fast you will progress when you play in a group. Plus, it's lots of fun to play with other people.
 
Hey Susan, I'm late to the greeting but I'm a 70 something too and still playing!
 
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