Low G How do you feel about this chord progression? (And the strumming patterns I've chosen.)

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BiosphereDecay

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I decided to throw key out the window, and just put together chords in a way that sounds best to me. The root is A major, so I guess it's maybe in A key. What key(s) do you think this chord progression is in?

I'm not sure the transition from A minor to BbM7 sounds quite right. I think another chord in between would sound better, but I'm trying to keep this to just 8 chords for this section of the song. It's at the beginning, and I wanted a very upward progression leading into the vocals.

(This is low G btw.)
----------
A 2100 (d-d-dudu)
Gsus2 0230
G 0232
Gsus4 0233
Am 2000 (dudududu)
BbM7 or A#M7 3210 (d-d-du-u)
C6 5430
D 7650
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I'd do a regular Bb 3211, but I'm really slow at barring, and felt it would be a lot easier to play with the A open. I want to learn to do it with the barre eventually though. It sounds a lot better as I move it along the neck if I play it with the standard Bb structure.

I'm not really sure if these chord names are accurate. I used three different chord namers, and sometimes they contradicted each other.
 
I've finally learned to play this and it's coming exactly as I'd hoped. I doubt I would change it much if at all. However, I am still left a bit befuddled when it comes to the key.

What key would you say this is? If it's A, which chords are not in that key? Are there any apps or sites that have a tool for determining this sort of thing?
 
It sounds more like the key of F, although in that key the G's are usually minor. However, forget about keys as you said. Music theory is supposed to be descriptive and not proscriptive. Since you're progressing up the fretboard, there is F chord (10 9 8 8) that might bring some resolution.
 
I chose Am mostly because of how easy it is to play. It transitions very easily from the preceding and proceeding chords. Looking at all of the minor chords, it seems like Dm and F#m are the only realistic possibilities. (By realistic I mean that I can actually play it.) I can do e minor too, but it's too high pitched for this purpose.

So how hard and fast is this rule that A major and A minor are never played together? If you had to choose between Am, Dm and F#m, which would you choose for this progression?
 
There's no rule they are just not in same keys. Many songs have multiple keys or include chords that are not in the key. If you want to learn about progressions then read the many texts available on the purpose of them. Playing some random chords in a sequence and trying to explain why it may sound pleasant is big undertaking.
 
There's no rule they are just not in same keys. Many songs have multiple keys or include chords that are not in the key. If you want to learn about progressions then read the many texts available on the purpose of them. Playing some random chords in a sequence and trying to explain why it may sound pleasant is big undertaking.
I have read quite a bit, but I know that there's a mountain of more reading to be done. Music theory is something that I study more or less every day, alongside practicing ukulele.

I wouldn't say that they're entirely random chords. The primary factor in choosing them was ease of playing to be honest. None of these chord transitions are hard in the slightest. But I also used my ear to find a progression that sounded good to me.
 
I have a few suggestions that helped me figure our where different chords lived before I had learned many patterns. I found it easier to experiment three strings at a time. Once you figure out what chords you want to hear, it can help you decide which chords you want to learn. In your example you play C6 and and D at the end. If you did not play your A string (only the G, C, and E strings), those chords would be C and D. As you play that stair step shape on the lower three strings up and down the fretboard you can find all your major chords. For instance, Bb would be 321x where you either don't sturm, or you mute the A-string. A is just that same pattern but with your index finger "behind the nut." You can find all the minor chords on those three strings starting with the Dm shape (221x) and walking up the fretboard.

You can play a similar game skipping or muting the G string and playing on the C, E, and A strings. Here the major chord shape looks like the G shape (x232) if you bring it down two frets it is an F (x010) and you an walk it up two frets to A (x454). On these three strings the minor shapes are a stair steps: Em (x432), and if you bring it down two frets you get Dm (x210) or take it up the fretboard for other minor chords. Also, A minor is (x000) and by walking that shape up, either as a three string barre or with three fingers you find your minor chords as well. And if you want a 7 chord start with the G7 shape (x212) and walk it up the fretboard.

It's your progression and you should take it where it sounds good to you. Looking at what you posted, the A major chord looks the most out of place to me because of the C# (the key also has F# and G#). Looking at Gsus2, G, Gsus4 I think that is a line cliche, which is a nice kind of figure, but to my ear it sounds like from there it really wants to resolve to a C chord or move toward the key of D.
 
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I have a few suggestions that helped me figure our where different chords lived before I had learned many patterns. I found it easier to experiment three strings at a time. Once you figure out what chords you want to hear, it can help you decide which chords you want to learn. In your example you play C6 and and D at the end. If you did not play your A string (only the G, C, and E strings), those chords would be C and D. As you play that stair step shape on the lower three strings up and down the fretboard you can find all your major chords. For instance, Bb would be 321x where you either don't sturm, or you mute the A-string. A is just that same pattern but with your index finger "behind the nut." You can find all the minor chords on those three strings starting with the Dm shape (221x) and walking up the fretboard.

You can play a similar game skipping or muting the G string and playing on the C, E, and A strings. Here the major chord shape looks like the G shape (x232) if you bring it down two frets it is an F (x010) and you an walk it up two frets to A (x454). On these three strings the minor shapes are a stair steps: Em (x432), and if you bring it down two frets you get Em (x210) or take it up the fretboard for other minor chords. Also, A minor is (x000) and by walking that shape up, either as a three string barre or with three fingers you find your minor chords as well. And if you want a 7 chord start with the G7 shape (x212) and walk it up the fretboard.

It's your progression and should take it where it sounds good to you. Looking at what you posted, the A major chord looks the most out of place to me because of the C# (the key also has F# and G#). Looking at Gsus2, G, Gsus4 I think that is a line cliche, which is a nice kind of figure, but to my ear it sounds like from there it really wants to resolve to a C chord or move toward the key of D.
Thank you for such a detailed response! It'll take me some time to process all that, but I get the gist of most of it.
 
The only priority is success. You can play A and A minor together as long as it produces the sound you want. Usually pairing the flat 3rd of the minor with the third of the major creates dissonance, but if they're far enough apart no one will notice. You're the boss; you can do what you want. I almost always play in E and I'll be doing aggressive stuff like 13 chords or half-diminished or augmented. But I will often just drop in a D major just because I want to and because it sounds good to me. D isn't in my key but I play it anyway. Maybe there is some piece of theory which would justify my position, but I do it because it is my song and I can do whatever I want.
 
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