How to play E major chord?

aziandoll

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Hi everyone, I'm pretty new to playing ukulele. I'm having trouble playing the E major chord. What fingering do you use? It seems that every time I play it, it ends up sounding muted. Sometimes it buzzes. Are my fingers too fat? :confused: I use my first finger on the A string, 2nd fret, and then the other fingers on the 4th fret of the other strings. I don't know what I am doing wrong. I am playing a soprano. I'd appreciate any help. Thanks :)
 
Please use the "SEARCH" feature........
 
Ah the uke E chord, the equivalent of a guitar players F.

I've found that growing an extra finger has helped. Alternatively, get a family member to hold one of the strings down for you.

If all of that doesn't work, it's practice I'm afraid...
 
C'mon, be nice. Dude only has five posts.

If the top knuckle of your ring finger is flexible and facile, you can barre the second fret with your pointer and do a partial barre of the fourth with your ringer, leaving the A string open. Or you can not worry about the A string because that exact same note is being played on the G string.

Sometimes the E7 will work in its place (1202) or you can give it the old (2225).
 
Also, try not to avoid it. I avoided songs with the e-chord when I started out. I know i'm stating the obvious but try and play it at every opportunity. Bob Marley songs tend to use a whole load of E's so maybe you could give them a go. Get it out of the way early on and soon enough it just becomes another chord that you won't give second thought to :)
 
Ouch! :biglaugh:



.

I know!

The best way to win over the E chord is to just play it.

I either use 2444 the way you described it or 7444 with a barred 4th fret and pinky on the first string, interchangeably depending on what sounds better.

practice practice practice...
 
If the top knuckle of your ring finger is flexible and facile, you can barre the second fret with your pointer and do a partial barre of the fourth with your ringer, leaving the A string open. Or you can not worry about the A string because that exact same note is being played on the G string.
This is the way I approach it, for the exact reason RevWill gives...if you accidentally mute the first string it's still an E chord!
 
I jammed my ring finger playing basketball when I was a kid and the top knuckle has zero backwards bend to it, making it impossible to bar the gCE strings. I have been able to work around that and can finally play a semi-decent E using my middle finger to bar those strings. It's not pretty, but good enough for me, and as others have posted, don't avoid it. I find that the more I use it, the better it sounds.
 
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Thank you!

Thank you everyone for helping me! It's funny, I asked my ukulele teacher about it, and he showed me the 2444 way, and he plays it just fine. I bought Roy Sakuma's chord book and found other ways to play it too.. but when I play an E Kaholo, (F7-B7-E), just going to that E from a B7 is difficult. So, I am just going to practice it and see which way works best. I thought that maybe because I was playing a soprano, that made it difficult as well, so he suggested a Tenor.
 
a really good transition to practice while learning the E (4442) is to go from B (4322) or Bm (4222) to E (4442)... coincidentally you can play "Three Little Birds" by Bob Marley in the key of B and you'll naturally have to do this over and over again...

Code:
B            
Rise up this morning,
F#          
Smile with the rising sun,
B          
Three little birds,
E         
Sit on my doorstep,
B
Singin' sweet songs,
F#
Of melodies pure and true,
        E (4447)             B
Sayin', this is my message to you-ew-ew,
B
Sayin' don't worry,
E
About a thing,
B
'Cause every little thing's,
E
Gonna' be alright...
 
Thank you everyone for helping me! It's funny, I asked my ukulele teacher about it, and he showed me the 2444 way, and he plays it just fine. I bought Roy Sakuma's chord book and found other ways to play it too.. but when I play an E Kaholo, (F7-B7-E), just going to that E from a B7 is difficult. So, I am just going to practice it and see which way works best. I thought that maybe because I was playing a soprano, that made it difficult as well, so he suggested a Tenor.

Working through the Doctor Uke material helps a lot with common transitions. In particular, working through Amazing Grace or Five Foot Two in All keys really stretches you.

I still can't get all the way through those exercises. Typically my hand starts getting pretty tired when I play the B / Bb family… But I have been learning a lot and it is very satisfying to be able to play in keys beyond C G and D.

(And yeah, that E to B7 is… hard. I can't do it worth beans.)
 
Thank you everyone for helping me! It's funny, I asked my ukulele teacher about it, and he showed me the 2444 way, and he plays it just fine. I bought Roy Sakuma's chord book and found other ways to play it too.. but when I play an E Kaholo, (F7-B7-E), just going to that E from a B7 is difficult.
How are you fingering the B7? If you play it as 4322 and use your index finger to barre the entire 2nd fret, your middle finger to fret the 3rd string, and your ring finger to fret the 4th string then all you need to do to switch to the E is lay your ring finger down so it barres the 2nd and 3rd strings as well as the 4th. (Incidentally, you always write chord fingerings starting on the 4th string, so E is 4442, not 2444.) To make this easier, practice the B7 by fingering the E first then lifting your ring finger so it's only pressing down the 4th string. Then add your middle finger on the 3rd string, 3rd fret. This is how you need to be setup for the B7 so that the change to the E is as smooth as possible.
 
The way I practice is to try and play D with my bottom three fingers, then when it comes to E just slide them up and curl your index finger :). Apologies if someone has suggested that already.
 
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