Song Help Request Hsus7... what?

Rubbertoe

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It could be European

In Germany, and Some other European countries, the musical scale does not stop at G, but includes H as well. H in that case means 'B-natural', and B means 'B-flat'.

Here is a source for that info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Note
(See 'History of Note Names' near the bottom)

So my guess is you'd play Bsus7. The writer probably either made a typo, or switched his notation system partway through by mistake. If all else fails, play it and see if it sounds good that way!
 
In Germany, and Some other European countries, the musical scale does not stop at G, but includes H as well. H in that case means 'B-natural', and B means 'B-flat'.

Here is a source for that info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Note
(See 'History of Note Names' near the bottom)

So my guess is you'd play Bsus7. The writer probably either made a typo, or switched his notation system partway through by mistake. If all else fails, play it and see if it sounds good that way!

I laughed when I saw the title to the thread, but thanks so much for the info. I'd never heard of anything like that before :)
 
Ya no worries. I saw something like that in this German hymn book some friends of mine had a while back and wondered the same thing myself.
 
Could be maybe a typo, since G and H are right next to each other. I don't know the song, so I wouldn't be able to tell you which sounds right, but maybe try a Gsus7 to see if that is right?
 
Just to explain that (it's extremly stupid actually^^):

Back in the good ol' days there were sitting some monks copying a book with sheets. Back than people wrote the small "b" kind of rectangular and some day it happend that the lowest line of the b was on the stave. when the next monk copied this book he didn't read a b, but an h (because he didn't see the bottom line of the b).

from that time on it became common to call the notes like: c d e f g a h c

meaning that h is the regular b, while the German "b" is the regular b-flat.

the only other nation I know which uses this system is Estonia.

and I can tell you, it can lead to a lot of frustration if you are German (as I am) and you play music with other people, because you will need some time to get that thing right in your brain... I still mix those notes (and especially chords since I learn the Uke in English) up sometimes..
 
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