I have an old '70's Stella Harmony 12 string. I want to put new strings on it and maybe learn a few chords with the intention of selling it.

Eggs_n_Ham

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It is currently strung with very old steel strings- can I put nylon strings on this old guitar? What would you all recommend for this vintage guitar? I acquired this guitar back in the '90's from someone that was forced to learn to play it (they were amazing actually) and they hated the guitar so sold it.
 
No it would not be useable with Nylon strings that are designed for six string classic guitars. If it is structurally sound then get the thinnest (extra light) string set you can find and have fun. If you find it very hard to play then tune it down one or two half tones.
 
Try light gauge 12 string set of your favorite brand can’t go wrong with DAddario phosphor bronze, and make sure you tune it down a whole step to D. Old 12 strings tend to have neck and /or bridge issues that may require major surgery by a skilled luthier.
I have an old Harmony 12 string model 1270 that has a solid wood spruce top and is light as a feather and seems like a bird.
 
I purchased a set of D'Addario phosphor light or extra light strings and just removed all the old strings. I literally took milk soapy water and a soft toothbrush and scrubbed the crud and years of funk out of the crevices and gearings. My question now can I use some kind of dressing oil or even a lanolin (do they even use lanolin anymore) to treat the body and the fretboard? The guitar has some bumps and a crack on the soundboard (looks very repairable to my untrained eyes).
This Harmony is a 12 string 913 I believe with a cedar top.
 
I purchased a set of D'Addario phosphor light or extra light strings and just removed all the old strings. I literally took milk soapy water and a soft toothbrush and scrubbed the crud and years of funk out of the crevices and gearings. My question now can I use some kind of dressing oil or even a lanolin (do they even use lanolin anymore) to treat the body and the fretboard? The guitar has some bumps and a crack on the soundboard (looks very repairable to my untrained eyes).
This Harmony is a 12 string 913 I believe with a cedar top.
The body should be finished and there are products available for this. Your local music store or online retailers like strings and beyond usually have some choices. As for fretboard I have used regular mineral oil from drug store with success. Just avoid organic oils that you would use for cooking as their residue will go rancid.
 
The body should be finished and there are products available for this. Your local music store or online retailers like strings and beyond usually have some choices. As for fretboard I have used regular mineral oil from drug store with success. Just avoid organic oils that you would use for cooking as their residue will go rancid.
Yes my initial thought was olive oil then I realized that wouldn't be a good idea and I also thought about mineral oil. when you say the body can be finished is that will an oil or some sort of polishing wax? I'll do some exploring around this; I'd like to see if I have something already available that would be suitable.
Thank you for your help!
 
I purchased a set of D'Addario phosphor light or extra light strings and just removed all the old strings. I literally took milk soapy water and a soft toothbrush and scrubbed the crud and years of funk out of the crevices and gearings. My question now can I use some kind of dressing oil or even a lanolin (do they even use lanolin anymore) to treat the body and the fretboard? The guitar has some bumps and a crack on the soundboard (looks very repairable to my untrained eyes).
This Harmony is a 12 string 913 I believe with a cedar top.
For the fretboard and untreated wood, lemon oil is recommended. Rosewood and ebony and walnut loves it in my experience. For the body, that all depends on what type of finish so you need to exercise some caution there.
 
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For the fretboard and untreated wood, lemon oil is recommended. Rosewood and ebony and walnut loves it in my experience. For the body, that all depends on what type of finish so you need to exercise some caution there.
Thank you for the recommendations. I'm not sure about the finish on the body, maybe I'll simply take a soft cloth and give it a gentle hand wipe/buffing so I don't damage the finish. When I took the strings off the bridge fell off (one piece no damage) so I'm going to simply put it back in it's position and let the strings hold it in place. That way whomever purchases it can repair the way they want it.
 
I don’t recommend any oil or wax products if you are planning on fixing the crack, and or, refinishing it…
Otherwise the glue or varnish will not stick.
 
Blind Willie McTell played a 12 string Stella. This is from 1931. My favorite early blues player, the only one in my collection.

 
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