Song Help Request I need help with split or slash chords

Ukejenny

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For ukulele. Specifically, E/G#, G#m/B, E/B, A/B, F#m/A

I know four strings can make it tricky to achieve, but if anyone has any tricks for the above chords, I would greatly appreciate it.
 
Generally the slash chords are a notation for guitar and bass, the guitarist plays the chords and the bass player plays the note after the slash.

Basically you just play the chord before the slash.

If you want to try and add the note after the slash, you may, but it is not necessary.

For example, F#m is 2120, the first and fourth strings are an A, so you are already playing that note.
E / G# well the E chord is 4442, and you are already playing G# on the second string.
E / B, again, already playing B on the first and fourth strings.
for A/B, you could try 2102
G#m/B G#m=4342 and you are already playing B on the 4th string and the first string.
 
For ukulele. Specifically, E/G#, G#m/B, E/B, A/B, F#m/A

I know four strings can make it tricky to achieve, but if anyone has any tricks for the above chords, I would greatly appreciate it.

The best way to make these chords sound as they should is to not strum them. You need to pick them and start with the the bass note (the note after the slash). To do this, you need to find this note, the lowest one that the uke can produce. Now pick a pattern of notes to follow. The the pattern work with the song. Don't be too rigid with the pattern either.
 
Hmm, I agree with Pueo that the inversion is generally less critical on uke, especially if you are playing with someone else hitting that bass note. I hate to disagree with Ken but simply picking instead of strumming won't give you a true slash chord either. For example, your typical E chord would be either 4442 or 4447. In either case, the low note in reentrant tuning is the 3rd string E. If you really want E/G# you have to go to 9877. Following this logic would give
G#m/B 13 11 11 11
E/B 13 11 12 11
A/B 9 11 9 12
F#m/A 11 999
 
Hmm, I agree with Pueo that the inversion is generally less critical on uke, especially if you are playing with someone else hitting that bass note. I hate to disagree with Ken but simply picking instead of strumming won't give you a true slash chord either. For example, your typical E chord would be either 4442 or 4447. In either case, the low note in reentrant tuning is the 3rd string E. If you really want E/G# you have to go to 9877. Following this logic would give
G#m/B 13 11 11 11
E/B 13 11 12 11
A/B 9 11 9 12
F#m/A 11 999

You are not correct, Jim. Each of those chords can be played simply close to the nut. You just pick out the the bass note first. It does give you a true version of the chord, even if the note is not a low as you might expect.
 
Thank you all so very much. Lots for me to think about and try. It wasn't sounding as the popular recording does and I have to remind myself that one ukulele can't sound like the entire cast of Riverdance. The song I'm working on is Lift the Wings. Thanks again, gang!
 
Not sure I follow what was said about having to finger pick the notes, as the slash chord says nothing about the rhythm or order in which the notes must be played. These are real chords and are meant to played with all notes being sounded together at the same time. They can of course be arpegiated, but the don't have to be.
The added note after the slash is indeed the bass note, meaning the lowest pitch in the voicing. It can be rather difficult on uke given that the range of the instrument is limited, even with a low G.
In general, you can ignore the note after the slash when playing uke, the main exception being when the note is not included in the chord before the slash.
Example: D/C (Could be fingered 2025 with high G)
In this case the lowest note, the open C string is actually the flatted 7th, making the chord a D7. By convention, the proper way to write this would be D7/C, but not everyone is aware of such rules.

( o)==::
 
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