If Hank Williams was Hawaiian

Uke with Smitty

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I’ve been playing a lot of Hawaiian songs on my low G tenor for several months now. I grew up playing and listening to a lot of old country and folk music, and when I was picking my way through Jambalaya the other day, I accidentally added in a Hawaiian vamp and realized it kind of works… Lol. I guess the Hawaiian revival era of music that I like and old country/folk music have a lot in common anyways, so it kind of makes sense. The more I think about it, the more I realize how similar they are. Hank Williams used a lot of steel slide guitar and it has an almost Hawaiian sound sometimes.

 
I’ve been playing a lot of Hawaiian songs on my low G tenor for several months now. I grew up playing and listening to a lot of old country and folk music, and when I was picking my way through Jambalaya the other day, I accidentally added in a Hawaiian vamp and realized it kind of works… Lol. I guess the Hawaiian revival era of music that I like and old country/folk music have a lot in common anyways, so it kind of makes sense. The more I think about it, the more I realize how similar they are. Hank Williams used a lot of steel slide guitar and it has an almost Hawaiian sound sometimes.


Wow. That's great has me hankering for more
 
Awesome! I love Hank Williams and old, classic country and folk music in general. Old country and folk songs are actually some of my favorite things to play on uke because it always feels like they wouldn’t work well on uke (just tonally) but often they work really well. Since many of these old songs rely on a heavy boom-chick using the guitar bass strings it’s always fun to try to figure out how to make the song sound full/complete. Depending on the chord voicings sometimes doing the bass lines on the the G and C strings works (on a low g uke) but often it doesn’t because they aren’t roots and fifths. It’s really satisfying to find a way around that and get something that works within the limits of the instrument.
 
I’ve been playing a lot of Hawaiian songs on my low G tenor for several months now. I grew up playing and listening to a lot of old country and folk music, and when I was picking my way through Jambalaya the other day, I accidentally added in a Hawaiian vamp and realized it kind of works… Lol. I guess the Hawaiian revival era of music that I like and old country/folk music have a lot in common anyways, so it kind of makes sense. The more I think about it, the more I realize how similar they are. Hank Williams used a lot of steel slide guitar and it has an almost Hawaiian sound sometimes.


Love it.
 
Wow. That's great has me hankering for more
Great playing! I’m a big fan of Hank Williams (just look at my username) and I agree about the similarities. When I first heard Hank Williams I thought it sounded like Hawaiian country haha
Awesome! I love Hank Williams and old, classic country and folk music in general. Old country and folk songs are actually some of my favorite things to play on uke because it always feels like they wouldn’t work well on uke (just tonally) but often they work really well. Since many of these old songs rely on a heavy boom-chick using the guitar bass strings it’s always fun to try to figure out how to make the song sound full/complete. Depending on the chord voicings sometimes doing the bass lines on the the G and C strings works (on a low g uke) but often it doesn’t because they aren’t roots and fifths. It’s really satisfying to find a way around that and get something that works within the limits of the instrument.
Thanks for the comments, everybody! I’m thinking maybe I should try “Hey Good Lookin’” in a Hawaiian style next
 
Cool. you may have stumbled onto "Jawaiian" music.
 
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