Is reentrant tuning harmful?

Brilliant!
 
I came across this article this morning and thought it appropriate for this group and discussion.
——————
Reprinted with kind permission of the Journal of Aural Medicine

A recent study of ukulele groups across North America sponsored by the Seattle College of Aural Medicine indicates that the average age of participants is 63.5 years old and getting older. Similar studies across Scandinavia and the UK would appear to confirm this phenomenon.

With ukuleles largely regarded as little more than toys, why is it that they are becoming the instrument of choice for so many aspiring musicians later in life?

The Seattle study offers a number of conclusions, some of which could have a lasting effect on how playing the ukulele is perceived. It is well known that any group activity such as playing musical instruments together helps with social cohesion and reduces isolation; but what else?
It is often remarked that as people get older, they can remember the words to a song 50 years ago, yet forget the names of the grandchildren. This cognitive activity is reflected in many ukulele group formats where songbooks are used spanning several decades, frequently reviving past memories.
However, this does not explain the increased popularity of the ukulele with an older demographic, and this is where the Seattle Audiology department comes in.

Laboratory conditions have shown that frequencies of around 392Hz (ukulele high G) are in the “degradation cluster range”. This has a progressive and detrimental effect on the ability to differentiate between sounds, tones and even octaves. It also goes someway to explaining why more senior ukulele players have difficulty in maintaining even the simplest of tunes accurately, whilst hearing themselves as “perfect pitch”.

The remedy is astonishingly simply. By changing the high G to a low G (196Hz) resembling the linear tuning of most commonly played stringed instruments, the auditory nerve rebalances the soundwaves into a more accurate signal. The ukulele player will adjust their vocal range almost imperceivably to suit; strumming with increased volume and enthusiasm, reducing the effect of the aural output of the player upon the rest of the group.
This article is reproduced with the kind permission of the Seattle College of Aural Medicine (S.C.A.M.).
First Published April 1st 2022 reprinted April 1st 2023
Ah good ol' SCAM U!
Pretty sure I saw the degradation cluster range in my telescope last night...
 
I read the whole thing, thinking that something must be wrong (you can still play that same g note on another string with low G), before realising what day it was.
That is what makes a good joke, you need to have people following along for a while before noticing the leg being pulled 😆
 
I came across this article this morning and thought it appropriate for this group and discussion.
——————
Reprinted with kind permission of the Journal of Aural Medicine

A recent study of ukulele groups across North America sponsored by the Seattle College of Aural Medicine indicates that the average age of participants is 63.5 years old and getting older. Similar studies across Scandinavia and the UK would appear to confirm this phenomenon.

With ukuleles largely regarded as little more than toys, why is it that they are becoming the instrument of choice for so many aspiring musicians later in life?

The Seattle study offers a number of conclusions, some of which could have a lasting effect on how playing the ukulele is perceived. It is well known that any group activity such as playing musical instruments together helps with social cohesion and reduces isolation; but what else?
It is often remarked that as people get older, they can remember the words to a song 50 years ago, yet forget the names of the grandchildren. This cognitive activity is reflected in many ukulele group formats where songbooks are used spanning several decades, frequently reviving past memories.
However, this does not explain the increased popularity of the ukulele with an older demographic, and this is where the Seattle Audiology department comes in.

Laboratory conditions have shown that frequencies of around 392Hz (ukulele high G) are in the “degradation cluster range”. This has a progressive and detrimental effect on the ability to differentiate between sounds, tones and even octaves. It also goes someway to explaining why more senior ukulele players have difficulty in maintaining even the simplest of tunes accurately, whilst hearing themselves as “perfect pitch”.

The remedy is astonishingly simply. By changing the high G to a low G (196Hz) resembling the linear tuning of most commonly played stringed instruments, the auditory nerve rebalances the soundwaves into a more accurate signal. The ukulele player will adjust their vocal range almost imperceivably to suit; strumming with increased volume and enthusiasm, reducing the effect of the aural output of the player upon the rest of the group.
This article is reproduced with the kind permission of the Seattle College of Aural Medicine (S.C.A.M.).
First Published April 1st 2022 reprinted April 1st 2023
What a cruel joke! 😁

I was getting worked up as I read this.
 
A tip of the hat and a big thumbs up. :oops:

Had me going for a bit and then I sais to my self, "Self, this is bogus." Your next follow up post confirmed it.

Great April 1 joke. :LOL:
 
Thanks, gang, for the positive responses. I can't take credit for the article, as it was lifted, shamelessly, from the Interwebs. I did think this would be a fun conversation for this forum.

I have to confess that I am in the demographic (actually, well into it!) that was described in the article and I do suffer from some of the listed side effects, but I do not attribute them to High "G" tuning. I have multiple instruments, some High G and some Low G, and they tend to be played equally. Based on my wife's observations, I am just as forgetful, regardless of which ukulele tuning was played recently.

The bottom line: Play whatever you damn-well like and be happy! :p
 
Larry, you got me. I'm a week behind on reading posts!
 
I came across this article this morning and thought it appropriate for this group and discussion.
——————
Reprinted with kind permission of the Journal of Aural Medicine

A recent study of ukulele groups across North America sponsored by the Seattle College of Aural Medicine indicates that the average age of participants is 63.5 years old and getting older. Similar studies across Scandinavia and the UK would appear to confirm this phenomenon.

First Published April 1st 2022 reprinted April 1st 2023
I assume the date is also relevant to this age bit?

It would be interesting to know what the average age really is.
 
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