Is there a way to strum and immediately mute the sound (not chucking)

Like when you strum and theres half a second of sound then it just mutes
If I am trying to do this with a C major chord in first position (0003) I will fret the chord with my ring finger on fret 3 and then mute the strings by resting my pinky over all 4 of them (still fretting hand).
 
You can mute the strings with either hand. Unless you are playing a lot of open strings, just lift off the frets ever so slightly or rest the fleshy part of your picking hand across the strings. Either way works great and can be done very quickly with practice. It’s the same basic concept as palm muting on guitar, only you don’t have to be as precise.
 
I do it with my strumming hand. "Palm muting" is what it's called. It works well for me because I almost exclusively thumb-strum, which puts my palm very close to the strings. It's a neat trick. I can do it with index-finger strumming, too. But, it's a little different. You'd either have to position your hand such that the palm is closer to the strings, or there would be a lot more movement involved.

I like the rhythmic sound of a subtle palm mute, and incorporate it into a lot of my strumming patterns.

There's always more than one way to accomplish something.
 
I hate open strings and I avoid playing them whenever I can. Since we were talking about C, I would play it as 5433 or X787 so that I could choke off the sound just by lifting the fingers a bit. If I had open strings I would certainly palm mute AKA the chuckless chuck.
 
I hate open strings and I avoid playing them whenever I can.
This is an interesting perspective. Is the idea generally that you can’t ornament an open string with a vibrato or similar ornamentation, so it’s more versatile to fret the note? James Hill makes a similar point in a ukulele way video. I get that idea playing melodies, but with chords I am curious about the idea.
 
With chords it is the same thing. You can bend notes in a chord or play it staccato. Plus, I do not like how different an open voice is from a closed one. However my main gripe with open strings is how using open strings to play scales disrupts the patterns I've learned.
 
Open strings can be easier to play, especially if you want more volume and sustain. In one tune I tried to do a pull off from one fret to another, and it was so difficult to get proper sound out of it that I transposed the song to go from one fret to open string.

However, if you want to mute shortly after every strum, avoiding them when choosing the inversion of the chord is the way to go.

I also often just mute with the palm of my strumming hand, but only when the muting only needs to happen once or twice per bar. Otherwise that will be a lot of work.
 
In the end, it is all just a matter of style. I prefer a lot of muting and even some soundboard thumping. I prefer to be more in control of the sound so that the music is more about me and less about the instrument. My Kamaka has a ton of sustain and for that reason I tend not to play it as much as I should.
 
A couple more... a volume foot pedal live, mute in post production, use a mic stand or music stand to mute strings live with string contact(suggest tape wrapping at the appropriate height).
 
Another point of view: No, it cannot be done.
 
I do it with my strumming hand. "Palm muting" is what it's called. It works well for me because I almost exclusively thumb-strum, which puts my palm very close to the strings. It's a neat trick. I can do it with index-finger strumming, too. But, it's a little different. You'd either have to position your hand such that the palm is closer to the strings, or there would be a lot more movement involved.

I like the rhythmic sound of a subtle palm mute, and incorporate it into a lot of my strumming patterns.

There's always more than one way to accomplish something.
I think you are describing chucking here. For palm muting you rest palm on strings BEFORE you pick to get a muted staccato attack. With chucking you put the palm down AFTER the strum to stop string vibration. And as was described the alternative is using the fretting hand to play all four string and just lifting the fingers off the strings to stop the vibration.
 
I get what you're saying. The difference is subtle, I guess. But, I'll try to explain.

The palm part is the same. What's different between a "chuck" and what I'm calling a "palm mute", is that a chuck is normally done with a rapid index-finger strum. It's not even a strum, it's an "attack" that is immediately palm-muted, and results in a "chuck" sound. The strings never quite ring, they are muted as soon as they are struck.

What I was talking about is what I do when I'm thumb-strumming. It's much softer. It's just placing the heel of my palm over the strings to stop them from ringing. But, I very much DO let the chord ring a bit before softly stopping it.

I'll be the first to admit, I'm no musician. There could very well be a better term for what I'm doing.
 
I think you are describing chucking here. For palm muting you rest palm on strings BEFORE you pick to get a muted staccato attack. With chucking you put the palm down AFTER the strum to stop string vibration. And as was described the alternative is using the fretting hand to play all four string and just lifting the fingers off the strings to stop the vibration.

I just learned something new:
When I mute the strings with my palm, I am not palm muting 😆. I must admit that by palm, I really mean the base of my hand/thumb. The palm itself is concave and not easy to touch the strings with.

So googling it, when palm muting you typically pluck one string, while it is muted with the palm or side of hand - but not completely deadened.
However, what I do is not chucking either. Chucking is when you strum with all strings muted so they are completely deadened. No notes or chords coming out, only a percussive effect. Exactly when the palm is placed where I will not judge, but you dont hear the notes. This was my impression and is more or less confirmed by my first googling, if someone knows better I might be mistaken.

What I do when I mute with the palm - not palm muting - is to let the note or strum ring clear for a short while before ending it.
I probably do it more on guitar. Run a few bass notes, cut the last one short with my palm (or rather the base of my hand/thumb), then do a few strums, cut the last one short etc.
 
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Ok so with chunking it seems that the strings are dampened immediately, but the method is the same if you let strings ring a bit and then dampen them with the ball of thumb.

Edit: After just playing along with Sarah and Craig I realized that a better way of doing this is to slap down on the strings with all fingers of the strumming hand to the extent that they tap on the top which adds percussion to the stop.
 
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There’s a couple of ways.

One is called a Palm Mute where you rest the edge of your hand just by the bridge. With practice, you can likely get exactly the sustain you want by varying pressure.

The second is easier, but less subtle, and that’s simply muting the strings after they’ve rung. That’s easiest playing the bar version of the chord, so play your c-major as 5433 rather than ooo3, your g as 2324 etc. Then you just release your grip and voila, muting.
 
For open chords, train your pinkie to mute the strings. With barre chords, simply release the pressure on the fretboard by slightly lifting your fingers, after playing.
 
The second is easier, but less subtle, and that’s simply muting the strings after they’ve rung. That’s easiest playing the bar version of the chord, so play your c-major as 5433 rather than ooo3, your g as 2324 etc. Then you just release your grip and voila, muting.
I was going to say that what you describe isn't muting, but I guess it depends on how you do it. "Release your grip" isn't a detailed enough description. If you fully release the chord, you've changed it to an all-open chord rather than fully muted it, and it still rings a little bit. To get the muting effect on a barre chord, you need to release just enough pressure to get the string off of the fret, but still under your finger. THEN you get an instant muting effect.

So many different ways to get different sounds.
 
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