Is there an alternate to Bm 5224? I just can't bend my fingers enough for this voicing.

This isn't answering your question, but may address your problem :) I think that version of Shenendoah is in D and has that particular minor chord voicing. This version of the song starts in G and doesn't have the same voicing problem!

 
FWIW, for the 4225 voicing, I find it easier to partial-barre (just) the middle strings with my first finger, rather than using a full barre. This allows the wrist to rotate a bit toward the headstock. On the downside, the index probably has to back-bend a little, which some players find difficult if not impossible.

Too often, players make chord shapes like this unnecessarily difficult because they try to support the neck with the palm or side of the hand. (Usually it's the result of not using a strap.) In consequence the fourth finger has to curl back inward rather than making a more natural arch and surer, more controllable contact with the string.
Agreed. I retain a bit of my formerly youthful digital bendiness so I can barre with the index finger, a good thing because I have small square hands. The chord shape rings clearly and I get a sense of accomplishment, as practice does indeed pay off!
 
This isn't answering your question, but may address your problem :) I think that version of Shenendoah is in D and has that particular minor chord voicing. This version of the song starts in G and doesn't have the same voicing problem!


I managed to overcome the challenge of the chord; this is a nice version of this lovely song. Thanks for posting, gives me another way to learn this lovely song.
 
If anyone else is struggling with the 4225 Bm, a useful practice tool is to work initially on Am (2003) using your fourth and little (pinkie) fingers to fret the notes. Once you can do that cleanly, it's an easy transition to move up two frets and add the barre because your other fingers already know where to go.
 
If anyone else is struggling with the 4225 Bm, a useful practice tool is to work initially on Am (2003) using your fourth and little (pinkie) fingers to fret the notes. Once you can do that cleanly, it's an easy transition to move up two frets and add the barre because your other fingers already know where to go.
That's generally the way I train my hand into a chord. I also will try to play a song with the chord whether I can play it or not- just keep at it. I'm also trying to teach myself fretting with my right hand and wow, talk about hand like a brick...
 
One last suggestion. Since my main key is E, I often play B. I do not care for the dom7/m7 rooted on the B on the 7th fret. To sidestep the issue, I will play an F, the tritone substitution of B. This may not work if you're playing a song in which the flavors are dictated by tradition, but it might be something to think about.
 
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