ISO all-wood banjolele

4ADiva

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A friend of mine has a beautiful all-wood banjo with a unique sound. (All-wood as in no skin and no resonator.)
I'm wondering if anyone has come across an equivalent in banjoleles. I haven't been able to find one when searching the Web.
Pointers to luthiers who make such a critter would be most welcome or if someone has one, I'd be interested to hear about it.
 
I have a Terry Mead all wood banjouke. Tenor size, if you are interested send me an email or pm and I will send some pics.

TerryMead-1.jpg
 
I thought I had PMd you but my mailbox doesn't show any sent msgs. Mystery. Anyway, yes, I'd like to see more pics of this banjolele and some audio or video of its sound. I'm intrigued by the soundhole and the closed back, because my friend's all-wood banjo has no soundhole and an open back. Thank you!
 
I have both the tenor above and the c scale banjo. The latter I have taken to tuning cGCEA rather than using bluegrass tuning. I play both in my ukulele group in Springfield VT. The group likes the banjo instrument when picked. The tenor speaks for itself. The sound is a little sharper than a regular shaped instrument. Both are different and great instruments by Terry Mead from California. I purchased the banjo one about 15 years ago on a trip to Los Angeles. The tenor I purchased before the pandemic. I used to have one of the old Gretsch camp fire ukes and gave it to a colleague after restoring it to playability. The sound is different mostly because the Mead uses a moveable bridge with the strings attached to the rim. The Gretsch (now reissued) has a regular mounted bridge. Sometime these instruments will be for sale but not quite yet.
 
I have a Terry Mead as well. Wonderful instrument. Does anybody know what ever happened to Terry Mead?
 
I used to go to his FB page but it just sort of died. I tried to call him once but got no reply. His instruments are first quality.
 
I've seen a Makai "banjolele" in a music store that had roughly that body shape- all-wood, and with a sound hole. Unfortunately I didn't get to hear what it sounded like. At the time I was skeptical as to whether a wood instrument with a sound hole counted as a banjo, or whether it was just a ukulele with an unusual body shape.
 
At the time I was skeptical as to whether a wood instrument with a sound hole counted as a banjo, or whether it was just a ukulele with an unusual body shape.
Because of the early Gretsch instruments I wold definitely call it a ukulele. It also has a solid back. The same basic instrument that I have with 5 strings and an open back is clearly a banjo - in spite of my tuning it as a ukulele.
 
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