I've got a concert and a tenor - Which would you have as high G and which as low G?

GradySeasons

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I recently started learning on a concert ukelele and then found a great deal on a tenor, so now I have two ukes. I'm keeping both. Should I string high G on the concert and low G on the tenor, or vice versa? Or string them both to high G? What would you do? Thanks
 
But that is not to say unequivocally that you can't string a concert low G, just that some will sound better than others. Same with soprano.
Many threads on here that show that you can do just about anything, and that those who do experiment more often than not are satisfied with their results. But for the OP question the obvious answer is to go with design default unless there are some very special circumstances that were not disclosed.
 
For me, in general: concert high and tenor low.

Like Ploverwing said, you have to try both on both. It's all about how each specific instrument reacts. Likely the concert they are both high already, so put a low on the tenor first as it may sound more "robust" with a low G. You will either like it, or not.
 
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You can do whatever you want. I don't dabble in the smaller sizes but I have two tenors. One is tuned linear and the other is re-entrant. That way all my bases are covered. That's what I would do. Of course, if a high-G or low-G configuration doesn't sound good to your ear on one of the ukes, you can always change it back. It isn't all that complicated. Don't go into analysis paralysis; just put some strings on those things and see how you like it.

And as for which to switch--that depends on your style. If you are a strummer who just plays the lower 3 frets or so, then it doesn't matter. On the other hand, I am more of an individual note kind of guy. My tenors have 19 frets and I play them all. So, for me, it makes more sense to tune low-G and make the most of that scale's range.
 
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I wish I had two of each size uke. It is true that you have to try out low and high g on each uke before you make an informed decision. No one can tell you what your ears like better. I switch my ukes around all the time between high and low g strings. I like the sound on all my ukes. Getting the right brand is important. Some strings sound better on the different ukes...i'm talking string material, not low or high g. Also, having that extra low end range on a smaller scale uke makes it interesting to stretch up higher while playing lower bass notes. It is much easier on my soprano and concert to make clear notes compared to the same stretches on a tenor. Just a few things to consider.
 
Honestly, you can go either way with either uke and it wouldn't be a big deal at all. However, there is an advantage of stringing your concert to low G. If you are playing transcriptions of classical, early music, etc, you will likely need low G, and the smaller fretboard will help facilitate the sometimes difficult chord shapes needed to perform said music. (shorter fretboard = less of a stretch on harder chords)
 
Consider keeping them both high g for now. Then you will get a better comparison between the two scales and which you prefer in high g. Later (days to weeks?), you can replace a single g string on one. Don’t cut the excess until you know you are happy and don’t want to switch to the other.
 
Lots of good advice here already. I would only add that if you are just starting out, there are so many variables and so many things you are trying sort out, that I wouldn't worry about it too much. Decide which one you like playing, because you are likely to spend much more time playing that ukulele. Then experiment with strings on that one first.

Not that you have to decide, but most folks I have met, both amateur and pro have a definite preference for playing either high G or low G. I play both and have strung soprano, concert, and tenor both ways, but I am primarily a low G guy. I have found that the tenors seem less fussy about the choice of low G string, than either concerts or sopranos.
 
I would string the tenor in Low g and the concert in high. This way if you don't like it you have enough low G string left to fit on your concert. Everybody has a pile of extra high G's. Very easy to come by. Ive never heard a concert that didn't sound better with a low G.
 
The conventional wisdom is that a Concert or Soprano body is really too small for Low G, or “Linear C” tuning, resulting in the low end being “choked” . .

BUT . . On the guitar, even with a Jumbo, the body is too small for the 5th and 6th strings. “Choked” is part of the sound, so it’s not as straightforward as even Physics would suggest.

So while my “Low G” ukes are a Tenor and a Baritone—that Bari liked being a step up from “Normal” (EAC#F#)—You might Prefer your Concert in that tuning. Buy a low-G string, try it, and see that you like it.
 
The conventional wisdom is that a Concert or Soprano body is really too small for Low G, or “Linear C” tuning, resulting in the low end being “choked” . .
Because I play low G soprano, I will fight this every step of the way. Yes, absolutely, there are instruments that do not sound good with low G, and a soprano or a concert may not be suited to low G but it's absolutely not a hard rule. Some tenors don't sound very good with low G either. I avoided soprano, agonizing that tenor scale just wasn't working for me, but I did not want to play high g. Never say never: it's only the cost of some strings to see if it really doesn't work for that particular instrument or not.
 
Because I play low G soprano, I will fight this every step of the way. Yes, absolutely, there are instruments that do not sound good with low G, and a soprano or a concert may not be suited to low G but it's absolutely not a hard rule. Some tenors don't sound very good with low G either. I avoided soprano, agonizing that tenor scale just wasn't working for me, but I did not want to play high g. Never say never: it's only the cost of some strings to see if it really doesn't work for that particular instrument or not.
That’s why it’s “ConventIon Wistom” and not “The Law and the Prophets” yes.
:)
 
That’s why it’s “ConventIon Wistom” and not “The Law and the Prophets” yes.
:)
For sure. But that particular refrain has turned a lot of people off trying low G on their soprano or concert, which is a shame, and why I'm bothering to make a big fuss about it. As I said, it's just the cost and effort of a string change or two to try something different, and it's so worth trying different types of strings even if the first low G effort was disappointing. That's true of any instrument regardless of size.
 
For sure. But that particular refrain has turned a lot of people off trying low G on their soprano or concert, which is a shame, and why I'm bothering to make a big fuss about it. As I said, it's just the cost and effort of a string change or two to try something different, and it's so worth trying different types of strings even if the first low G effort was disappointing. That's true of any instrument regardless of size.
The question was not about if it is possible to put low G on a small uke, but if it might be preferable to doing this on a tenor. I don't think anyone has supported the idea of preferring low G on concert compared to tenor yet?
 
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