Joes Romanillos and mojo

One does have to pick the right tool for the job. I have a couple of Maton guitars (Australian) and my wife has a cheap Brazillian Digiorgio classical. The tonal differences lend themselves to the different regional genres, with the Matons being Western in sound while the Latin feel of the Digiorgio is undeniable. I suppose it is also actual way street, with the instruments influencing the sound and style of the playing.

At the risk of digging a hole for myself, you need the right tool for the job.

Reading this thread, I was reminded of the antique archtop guitar played by David Rawlings with Gillian Welch. According to the story, they found the guitar abandoned in someone's attic when Rawlings was a poor student and couldn't afford a decent guitar. (EDIT: It's a 1935 Epiphone archtop.) Their music is largely inspired by old-time country and Appalachian music. The guitar has kind of a honky, mid-range heavy sound, and wouldn't be considered to have "good" tone by modern standards. But it totally works and sounds authentic to the music they play, and in fact, is a signature part of their sound. (Rawlings is an excellent guitar player, by the way). So yes, different genres of music are sometimes complemented by instruments that may differ in tone from whatever is considered "the best" for that instrument.
 
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The classical guitar is much harder to construct for a sound that is even from treble to bass response, tone clarity and volume. The steel string on the other hand is a piece of cake in all these same respects, IMO. Having built many of both styles, that is my opinion. I love both instruments and play both for my personal enjoyment.
 
The classical guitar is much harder to construct for a sound that is even from treble to bass response, tone clarity and volume. The steel string on the other hand is a piece of cake in all these same respects, IMO. Having built many of both styles, that is my opinion. I love both instruments and play both for my personal enjoyment.

I'd like to see a collection of instruments that contributors here make for their own entertainment and enjoyment. A thin-body version of this guitar would be my choice. I enjoyed playing it for years and when my house became too cluttered I took off the tuners and threw it away. I have a fear of seeming too normal. The rosette said "Damn you, Mesopotamia", a personal comment about the so-called cradle of civilization. I was feeling pretty bitter back then.

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You are definitely misinterpreting what I wrote. I doubt if your friends have developed enough finesse in their hearing to pick the best out of ten similar guitars, and I'd be surprised if any of them were capable of pulling out the best tone any of the instruments can produce.. It takes a lot of careful listening and access to a huge number of instruments to form such sensitivity. I certainly don't have ears like that. The judges at the bigtime violin making contests would laugh at the suggestion that anyone off the street could replace them. They may quibble about certain tonal variables, but ultimately they have to agree that one violin is, indeed, the best. I have been to listening sessions where one guitar took everyone's breath away and shut down the show---it was that good. If they get enough exposure, the best builders rise to the top of the heap and can charge the most for their instruments, so in that sense, the best tone costs the most. The largest percentage of us peons dwell pleasantly in the land of subjectivity because we don't have access to the best of anything or the ability to use it to its best advantage. To think otherwise is being naive.

If I'm misinterpreting what you wrote then you're misinterpreting what I wrote (and also passing judgement on my friends, which I don't know how you'd be able to do. Some of them are pretty talented!). I don't want to go too far down this rabbit hole since we don't seem to be able to find a common ground, so I'll just try to re-state my point one more time. If a player picks up an instrument and says, "I like this one the best, it has the best tone" I don't really think it's ANYONE's place (even a judge in a "contest") to tell them they're wrong, or they're not capable of understanding tone. If I tell you my favorite color is red, can you honestly come back to me and say "sorry, red isn't the best, blue is." It just doesn't make sense, does it? That's my point - tone is so subjective that it doesn't make sense to try to even have a discussion about musicians not being able to afford or understand what it takes for an instrument to have "the best" tone.
 
I'd like to see a collection of instruments that contributors here make for their own entertainment and enjoyment.

That would be pretty cool! A thread about the builders' OWN instruments vs those they're building for others.
 
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