Knotting, rather than tying (on a tie bridge)

kissing

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Just wondering whether it makes any difference to the tone if I knot the ends of the strings to put it on a tie-bridge, rather than tying it up in loops like you're supposed to.

I had some spare strings lying around, which were a tad too short to tie into a loop.

So I just tied the end of the strings into knots, put them through the holes at the bridge, so it's a bit like a slot-bridge.

Seems to be working fine, but I was wondering whether I was losing out on any advantages of actually tying the string.

2011-12-15012824.jpg
 
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I have two ukes with that type bridge and I dont like them at all. I like the way you have tied them , I may try that , looks neater . I'm thinking about trying to drill a hole in the bridge
so the knot will be hidden now that I've seen this. Gonna need a long bit .
 
I've heard it gives the strings a better break angle, or some nonsense like that :p Either way I feel that it looks much nicer than the standard tie configuration.
 
Interesting question. No answer, just some thoughts. My impression is that the saddle plays a more important part than the knot end of the bridge for sound generation. Since that is one of the two main points of contact between string and body, my guess is anything beyond saddle & nut is less critical in sound production.

I have yet to change strings on my uke, but this tip from Eric Devine (~3 min. mark) seems useful: http://youtu.be/xO0Kj24E_co

I took notes about the bead option weeks ago, but I wondered about possible rattling/buzzing of the beads against the bridge. It might not even be audible, but it would add another material component to the uke.
 
Very interesting information, the "break angle" idea is a little hard to get your head around though.

From the BridgeBoneBead link earlier, this illustration is pretty clear.

diagram.jpg

With the "traditional" tie bridge, the nature of the knotting ends up pulling the string UP so that it doesn't "break" as significantly across the saddle. With BridgeBoneBeads (or maybe the OP knotting solution OR the suggested drill through the bridge) the break angle is steeper, resulting on a more direct downward pressure on the saddle.

Tieing that knot isn't too hard & you don't really need to change uke strings as often as you might with other stringed instruments, but I REALLY like the BridgeBoneBeads (designed by UU'er; SouthCoastUkes)
 
That illustration was most likely done by graphic designer who was given a breif to over exaggerate the point that the marketing people are trying to sell. I reckon it is total rubbish, if a string is installed correctly there would be no difference to the "break angle" it quite simply doesn't work like it has been illustrated, the tied section that comes back over the bridge doesn't have a huge amount of weight on it, almost all the weight is taken at the rear of the bridge where the string wraps around to be tied.
 
That illustration was most likely done by graphic designer who was given a breif to over exaggerate the point that the marketing people are trying to sell. I reckon it is total rubbish, if a string is installed correctly there would be no difference to the "break angle" it quite simply doesn't work like it has been illustrated, the tied section that comes back over the bridge doesn't have a huge amount of weight on it, almost all the weight is taken at the rear of the bridge where the string wraps around to be tied.

Actually... if you look at a "representative" sample of several fellow ukers tied bridges, you are more than likely to see that the tie is doing exactly what the ilustration is describing. Its not "weight" or really even string tension that is at issue, it is the fact that that particular tie method has a tendency to pull the string UP from the inside portion of the bridge so that it decreases the angle over the saddle. The UU member who designed these (at least the uke version of these) is a well respected string supplier & ukulele builder.

Do a search for "BridgeBoneBeads" on UU for other tying discussions like this one:

http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?44502-Bridge-Tie
 
One "word" - BridgeBoneBeads

(or whatever works for you)

I'm so used to tying these knots from having three nylon string guitars and several ukuleles with this type of bridge, but I did buy several sets of these and have them on my two baritones. They are so easy to use. I have one more set that I will put on my Kala acacia tenor the next time I change strings.

While we are on the topic of bridges/saddles, does anyone have the style that goes through the top and out the sound hole to tie the knot? I just did my first string change on my Glyph tenor and it took over an hour and was not fun. I'm afraid to damage the top sticking my hands through the sound hole. My hands are big and getting my fingers in there is difficult and of course the strings did not cooperate and kept getting caught or went to the back instead of towards the sound hole. Any helpful hints would be appreciated. I know it will get easier with practice. Thanks.
 
I've heard it gives the strings a better break angle, or some nonsense like that :p Either way I feel that it looks much nicer than the standard tie configuration.

A better string break angle is no "nonsense", for without the upward pull of each string from underneath (when a tie on bridge string set is tied on normally), the break angle is in fact increased substantially. This can be important when the string break angle is substandard to begin with.

Your comment is in fact a bit foolish. :eek:
 
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Actually... if you look at a "representative" sample of several fellow ukers tied bridges, you are more than likely to see that the tie is doing exactly what the ilustration is describing. Its not "weight" or really even string tension that is at issue, it is the fact that that particular tie method has a tendency to pull the string UP from the inside portion of the bridge so that it decreases the angle over the saddle. The UU member who designed these (at least the uke version of these) is a well respected string supplier & ukulele builder.

Do a search for "BridgeBoneBeads" on UU for other tying discussions like this one:

http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?44502-Bridge-Tie
Please don't get me wrong with this one Gmoney, I have no intention to be disrespectful to fellow members, in fact I think that the product is an innovative and elegant solution for securing the strings at the bridge. What I do question is the illustration that has been used to demonstrate the effect on a string that has been tied in the conventional way.
 
Please don't get me wrong with this one Gmoney, I have no intention to be disrespectful to fellow members, in fact I think that the product is an innovative and elegant solution for securing the strings at the bridge. What I do question is the illustration that has been used to demonstrate the effect on a string that has been tied in the conventional way.

I have just never liked the "look" of the bridge bead solution. It would make more sense to me simply to have a small piece of ebony with a small hole through (such as a piece of edge binding) to be used much like the beads. It lays flat and looks neater. An optimum solution is to hand fit a single slab of ebony binding material and have the 4 holes spaced to match the hole spacing of the bridge being used.

This way the the knots are secured against the back of the bridge in a less noticable way, no matter what the hole sizes in the bridge itself. I have made these up for instruments in the past,.... in short order. They do the job well and with a cleaner look.
 
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Please don't get me wrong with this one Gmoney, I have no intention to be disrespectful to fellow members, in fact I think that the product is an innovative and elegant solution for securing the strings at the bridge. What I do question is the illustration that has been used to demonstrate the effect on a string that has been tied in the conventional way.

Me to. Next time he/she should draw a picture of a knot that has been actually tied. The conventional knot is easy peasy to do, and the resulting angle on my ukes looks nowhere near what's shown on the picture. In fact, the angle shown on the right looks spot on. I do however understand that beads might look better to someone.
 
I don't know if this is looks like a typical knot, but the angle change does not seem significant.
tie.jpg
 
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