Loudest soprano

It's very difficult to tell - as the player, I don't hear what the audience does so loudness is quite hard to pin down.

Saying that, my spruce Argapa is probably the loudest uke I own.
 
I don’t own expensive Ukes but have played near or next to folk who do. To my recollection about the loudest Soprano I’ve heard was a Wunderkammer, it’s voice could be heard over the surrounding Ukes and thankfully it was very well played.
 
"Loudness" is a subjective term as what one perceive as a loud instrument is often not necessarily louder in terms of volume that can be measured in dezibels but one that has frequencies that are more prominent to the human ear. For example a soprano strummed beside a baritone may appear much louder because it is brighter even if baritone actually has a higher dezibel output. Would be nice to have reporting of actual maximum dezibels output of vigorously strummed sopranos for comparison here.
 
To my recollection about the loudest Soprano I’ve heard was a Wunderkammer, it’s voice could be heard over the surrounding Ukes and thankfully it was very well played.
I think that speaks to the variability of instruments. While there are generalities that may hold true for certain makers, it is probably best to evaluate each on their own merits. I had a Wundekammer a while back and it was not a particularly loud instrument.

Now this will provide fuel for all of the avid uke buyers out there. I can imagine people thinking "I have this one that I really like. Maybe another one of the same brand will be EVEN BETTER! I need to try them all and go buy some more to find out!! ;)
 
If all the ukulele players lived in one city in the world, everyone would swap around everyone's instruments when they needed and realise they were happy with this or that. But because we are all largely crepuscular and far apart from ukulele people and the physical specialist shops, we have to buy things and resell them via the mail (or just keep 'em piled up).
 
My mahogany Timms is by far the loudest soprano I've ever played. It's on par with my banjo uke, which gives you a rough idea.

The koa Timms I have is a little more subdued by comparison, but still loud for a soprano.
My mahogany Timms can take over a room if I pair it with bright fluorocarbon strings. That’s why I’ve switched to nylons, for now.

The one that really cuts through the clutter, though, is my Ohana SK-28 (an homage to the Nunes style ukes of the early days). Maybe it’s the narrow waist or the super-light build. I don’t know. It’s a delightful fire alarm. It’s also a bit shrill with bright strings. I recently switched (again) from fluoros to Super Nylguts just to balance the sound slightly.

As mentioned before, perceived volume can be a function of the frequencies played.
 
If all the ukulele players lived in one city in the world, everyone would swap around everyone's instruments when they needed and realise they were happy with this or that. But because we are all largely crepuscular and far apart from ukulele people and the physical specialist shops, we have to buy things and resell them via the mail (or just keep 'em piled up).
My ukulele experience exactly and yes, crepuscular
 
For sheer volume, it's my '50s Martin by a wide margin. As mentioned above, though, the ability of an instrument to cut through isn't simply a question of decibels but where the sound is concentrated in the frequency spectrum. On both counts the Martin is a guitar killer that can make itself heard without amplification in many contexts.
 
Besides comparisons of quieter and louder, to me there are two kinds of "loud;" clean, crisp, and bold with good note separation, or cluttered and overdriven (ill-defined, distorted) that may[?] be referred to as "bark."
 
To my ears tone quality is much more important than volume. I have ukes of various wood combos and I will pick the one I think best suits the music I'm playing. Also right hand technique makes a big difference. I can get a lot more volume if I use my index fingernail to play with versus the pad of my thumb.

As for my soprano ukes, I would have to say that my opio is the loudest. I actually have more long neck sopranos than regular sopranos but thats not what we are discussing. Millar makes some really loud instruments and I have a few. Unfortunately I've never tried one of their regular sopranos. I also have a Caravelle Kitchen Sopranino. That little thing really cranks the volume!
 
To my ears tone quality is much more important than volume. I have ukes of various wood combos and I will pick the one I think best suits the music I'm playing. Also right hand technique makes a big difference. I can get a lot more volume if I use my index fingernail to play with versus the pad of my thumb.

As for my soprano ukes, I would have to say that my opio is the loudest. I actually have more long neck sopranos than regular sopranos but thats not what we are discussing. Millar makes some really loud instruments and I have a few. Unfortunately I've never tried one of their regular sopranos. I also have a Caravelle Kitchen Sopranino. That little thing really cranks the volume!
Which one of your ukes has the loudest tone quality to you ears?
 
My UKESA is my loudest soprano. I think that it might be my loudest ukulele overall. Surprisingly, my second place soprano and not so far behind is the Famous (Kiwaya) koa laminate soprano (FS-5G) I ordered from Japan via Amazon weeks ago and just received this week. I will do a NUD post this weekend. My Famous soprano is actually a bit too bright for my preference. Any suggestions for strings to warm it up just a little? (I am not a fan of nylon.)
 
My UKESA is my loudest soprano. I think that it might be my loudest ukulele overall. Surprisingly, my second place soprano and not so far behind is the Famous (Kiwaya) koa laminate soprano (FS-5G) I ordered from Japan via Amazon weeks ago and just received this week. I will do a NUD post this weekend. My Famous soprano is actually a bit too bright for my preference. Any suggestions for strings to warm it up just a little? (I am not a fan of nylon.)
I personally like Fremont Blacklines for this. Worth Browns will also be a good one to try.
 
Besides comparisons of quieter and louder, to me there are two kinds of "loud;" clean, crisp, and bold with good note separation, or cluttered and overdriven (ill-defined, distorted) that may[?] be referred to as "bark."

I agree, note separation is the key. I have four tenors: a Beck, a Talsma, a Mya-Moe and a vintage Martin. All have better than average volume, but the Beck also has the best note separation of any ukulele I've ever played. I play every week in a quintet with piano, upright bass, guitar and percussion. It's remarkable how clearly it can be heard even with a gentle strum. It has a Mi-Si pickup, but for rehearsals I rarely feel the need to plug it in, even if the guitar and bass are amplified.
 
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