Need help identifying this uke

kmeg

New member
Joined
Jun 20, 2024
Messages
2
Reaction score
1
I found this ukulele at Goodwill Hawaii. Can anyone give me an idea of what kind of wood it’s made of, and any idea of its age. I seems very well made, but has no maker marks.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_3661.jpeg
    IMG_3661.jpeg
    139.2 KB · Views: 55
  • IMG_3663.jpeg
    IMG_3663.jpeg
    128 KB · Views: 55
  • IMG_3662.jpeg
    IMG_3662.jpeg
    110.7 KB · Views: 45
  • IMG_3666.jpeg
    IMG_3666.jpeg
    144.6 KB · Views: 46
  • IMG_3665.jpeg
    IMG_3665.jpeg
    98.5 KB · Views: 45
  • IMG_3664.jpeg
    IMG_3664.jpeg
    88.3 KB · Views: 46
  • IMG_3667.jpeg
    IMG_3667.jpeg
    138.8 KB · Views: 55
I am new at this and have only played with one vintage ukulele. But I can give you one thing to try. Can you look inside at the back/sides and see if the grain of the wood looks the same on the inside and outside - that’s one way to see if it might be made from laminate or solid wood.
 
Hawaii has a lot of amateur hobbyist luthiers who build ukuleles for fun and mostly give them away to friends and relatives. With no label, you may never be able to learn who made this. The bridge is unusual and I wonder what the intonation is like. Sometimes you can estimate the age of the instrument by figuring out what company made the tuning machines, then figuring out when they were made.
 
Thank you both. From inside, the grain does look the same on the sides and back, so it’s solid wood. I saw pictures of older ukes online with tuners like these, but I can’t think of any way to find out more.
 
If it’s solid wood, I’d be stringing it up to see how it sounds!
 
It looks like Acacia or maybe Koa , nice looking find. String it up and let's hear it!
 
The holes in the bridge look a bit odd and not well aligned. How are the strings supposed to get attached?
I noticed that as well. The holes look like they were drilled by hand, not a center-drill, and were done without a pilot hole drilled first. Very raw!

Re: the strings - I'm wondering if the strings are fed from the top of the bridge, and make a 90 degree turn to come out at the "bottom." That would seem easier to manage than coming from the opposite way, no? Definitely "non-stennard."
 
Top Bottom