New project

I've decided to use an m5 bolt and cross dowel on the neck joint ...most builders use m6 or a 1/4 inch bolt ... as an m5 stainless bolt can hold a load of 1,800 Kg ..I think that will do the job fine ...in fact most modern bicycles have the seat and handle bars held with a single m5 bolt.
 
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In between traveling up and down the the country playing in his band, Mike is now coming close to the final CNC produced neck ...it's a good job too as I've almost run out of cheap wood.. He is trying to machine a complete finished job including headstock volute and heel ..also the drilled cross dowel hole ... this is the number 11 attempt with a dimensional error on the nut position...James Dyson made over 500 prototypes of his DC1 vacuum cleaner so we're no where near that yet...This is produced in two separate set ups ..and I'll try and show more later when he does a Mahogany one. :)



 
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As a matter of interest Ken, would your son have to modify the code he has created, to switch from the above soft wood to a hardwood like mahogany? For example , feed rates and cutting depths etc. I don't know anything about cnc and it's too late for me to learn, but I was just wondering. Cheers Mike.
 
As a matter of interest Ken, would your son have to modify the code he has created, to switch from the above soft wood to a hardwood like mahogany? For example , feed rates and cutting depths etc. I don't know anything about cnc and it's too late for me to learn, but I was just wondering. Cheers Mike.
To be honest ..I don't know :)
 
Ta Daaaaa ! After 14 trial and error attemps Mike has finally succeeded in producing the completed CNC neck... He had a tough time sorting out the bugs and errors in the program and after occasionally banging his head against the doorframe he has produced the fully carved neck in mahogany. He is now programming another setup to machine the tuner holes.







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Well done! Having done a little programming, I can just imagine the trial and error (aka loud swearing) that went into this final product. Congratulations Mike!
 
Finally completed the prototype and it's a good'n ...I'm very pleased with the result sound wise ... It's the same scale length as the Martin style 0 , but the neck joins the body at the 14th as planned giving more access to the upper 17 frets ... bridge stays in the sweet spot... body widened to compensate for the volumetric loss in the upper bout ...also the tuners have been moved up the headstock a tad to give more hand space when using chords at the top end eg: E7. It sounds really loud with a better mid range on the tone than my other sopranos and I'll make a video tomorrow with comparisons to a couple of genuine Martin Sopranos.
 
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Finally completed the prototype and it's a good'n ...I'm very pleased with the result sound wise ... It's the same scale length as the Martin style 0 , but the neck joins the body at the 14th as planned giving more access to the upper 17 frets ... bridge stays in the sweet spot... body widened to compensate for the volumetric loss in the upper bout ...also the tuners have been moved up the headstock a tad to give more hand space when using chords at the top end eg: E7. It sounds really loud with a better mid range on the tone than my other sopranos and I'll make a video tomorrow with comparisons to a couple of genuine Martin Sopranos.
IMG_6154 by Ken Timms,

Very cool! I admire the innovation and also love how you have retained classic Martin elements. It looks fabulous.

If I may make a slightly tongue in cheek suggestion for a name: how about the Timbuck Two?
 
Very cool! I admire the innovation and also love how you have retained classic Martin elements. It looks fabulous.

If I may make a slightly tongue in cheek suggestion for a name: how about the Timbuck Two?
These are serious instruments, I prefer Timms Style 0/1/2/3 based on the trim. The true successor to the vintage martins
 
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