New project

Finally completed the prototype and it's a good'n ...I'm very pleased with the result sound wise ... It's the same scale length as the Martin style 0 , but the neck joins the body at the 14th as planned giving more access to the upper 17 frets ... bridge stays in the sweet spot... body widened to compensate for the volumetric loss in the upper bout ...also the tuners have been moved up the headstock a tad to give more hand space when using chords at the top end eg: E7. It sounds really loud with a better mid range on the tone than my other sopranos and I'll make a video tomorrow with comparisons to a couple of genuine Martin Sopranos.
IMG_6154 by Ken Timms,
Can't wait to try this style!
 
Well, for me, it passes the "how does it look?" test. I'm sure the playability will be fine. Now I'm looking forward to hearing its voice.
 
What CNC are you using. The quality is impressive. I hope to try one of these some day!
What CNC are you using. The quality is impressive. I hope to try one of these some day!
Mike bought this machine on Amazon but they don't seem to be available there anymore but they are on Ebay they are very sturdy and do a really neat job once you learn how to operate it...I have put together a few DIY machines but never learned how to use the computer stuff.
 
Well - that was interesting. I find it difficult to describe particular sounds in comparison with others. Suffice to say that I very much liked what I heard. The single notes sound clear and true; the strummed sections seem to give a good balance across the strings.

I think you've found a really nice blend of characteristics, Ken.

I'ma gonna hafta try one of these little beauties!
 
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Mike bought this machine on Amazon but they don't seem to be available there anymore but they are on Ebay they are very sturdy and do a really neat job once you learn how to operate it...I have put together a few DIY machines but never learned how to use the computer stuff.

The description for that says:
"Software Environment:windows Xp / Win7 with 32bite(Proper Computer System Makes the Software Run , Otherwise It Will Not)"

Do those things really need an old 32 bit version of Windows?
 
The description for that says:
"Software Environment:windows Xp / Win7 with 32bite(Proper Computer System Makes the Software Run , Otherwise It Will Not)"

Do those things really need an old 32 bit version of Windows?
Hi Dibs nice to hear your still around....yes! that's right we soon got that sorted..(well I mean Mike did He was using an old 32 bit pirate version anyway} :)
 
Now that we know that the new design is a potential winner....The CNC is being put to good use... the neck carving program is completed and now the manufacture of the bending jig is in progress, starting with the former made from 10mm thick aluminium plate and will be connected together with "heat retaining" 10mm dia steel rods... The aluminium cuts just as easy as hardwood with the right speeds and feeds with a 4 mm single flute end mill.
This is the part completed former.
 
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That's fair enough if you can afford Solidworks. I use Fusion 360 for free since I'm non commercial. and find it perfectly adequate for my purposes.

I just wanted to point out that you can do this stuff without having to pay a fortune for software if you're a hobbyist.
 
That's fair enough if you can afford Solidworks. I use Fusion 360 for free since I'm non commercial. and find it perfectly adequate for my purposes.

I just wanted to point out that you can do this stuff without having to pay a fortune for software if you're a hobbyist.
Nice to have an option!
 
I laminate my sides now Ken. Two 1mm 'veneers' squished into a male/female mold. No heat is required and as stable as any rigid structure. It has the effect of making the instrument louder and with judicious resawing, enables me to use 'risky' figured woods.... Chuck's method of using heat blankets is the best for bending IMO but unlike laminating you still get spring back unless you are Matthias Wandell and calculate the overbend needed to avoid this.

Laminate. You know it makes sense. You will certainly avoid those waist creases
 
Hi Ken, I'm wondering if Mrs. T is still doing your finishing , I also wonder if so, is she staining the mahogany a darker color. I love that vintage dark coloring and would like to achieve that look. I have mixed up the darkest Shellac flakes I have, I believe it's Ruby and it is still much too light. I would love to know your secret!
 
G
That's fair enough if you can afford Solidworks. I use Fusion 360 for free since I'm non commercial. and find it perfectly adequate for my purposes.

I just wanted to point out that you can do this stuff without having to pay a fortune for software if you're a hobbyist.
the Only way to get Solid works nowadays is to rent it and it's very expensive ££££€€€ Luckily the version Mike uses is an old one that he got hold of a few years ago. it's now obsolete but still does a great

 
Hi Ken, I'm wondering if Mrs. T is still doing your finishing , I also wonder if so, is she staining the mahogany a darker color. I love that vintage dark coloring and would like to achieve that look. I have mixed up the darkest Shellac flakes I have, I believe it's Ruby and it is still much too light. I would love to know your secret!
There is no stain at all on that mahogany used for this uke ... It's just very dark to start with... And the shellac is Garnett shade that She always uses.
 
I laminate my sides now Ken. Two 1mm 'veneers' squished into a male/female mold. No heat is required and as stable as any rigid structure. It has the effect of making the instrument louder and with judicious resawing, enables me to use 'risky' figured woods.... Chuck's method of using heat blankets is the best for bending IMO but unlike laminating you still get spring back unless you are Matthias Wandell and calculate the overbend needed to avoid this.

Laminate. You know it makes sense. You will certainly avoid those waist creases
I will give it a try Pete ....and get back here with the results. :)
 
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