Please help me with these quizzical chords

bunnyo

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My friends,

I'm studying Matt Stead's beginner course and being a lifelong Beatles fan, I realized that I now know 4 of the chords to Let it be according to the website tontoremy.com. the remaining 3 chords confuse me because they're a combination of 2 chords each. I know it's precocious of me, but I'd like to learn this song. My heart aches for a song that means something to me that I can play to Luna, lol.

help would be so very much appreciated ❤️

thanks all,

Bunny
 
Hello Bunny. Usually the chords used for Let It Be are: C, G, Am, and F. Are these the ones you are using? If not, which ones do you use? If so, what part is confusing you? The strum would be in 4/4 time.
 
You're right, I checked my guitar tab, but it still has something I don't understand. I've attached a pic. Does it make sense? C/F?

Thanks!
 

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C/E is a way to tell you that you should play a C chord with the E note in the bass, or the lowest note. 5433 is the chord you want to play. The third string, 4th fret is the E note. But, You don't really have to worry about the so-called "slash" chords when you are using guitar sheet music. You can play the open C chord 0003 and it will sound the same. The Beatles weren't playing a uke on that song anyway.

By the way, just for clarity, that isn't guitar tab. It is standard notation.
 
What are the chords for the 9 chord set?
 
C/E is a way to tell you that you should play a C chord with the E note in the bass, or the lowest note. 5433 is the chord you want to play. The third string, 4th fret is the E note. But, You don't really have to worry about the so-called "slash" chords when you are using guitar sheet music. You can play the open C chord 0003 and it will sound the same. The Beatles weren't playing a uke on that song anyway.

By the way, just for clarity, that isn't guitar tab. It is standard notation.
Thanks, I didn't quite know what it was called. What's tablature?
 
Thanks, I didn't quite know what it was called. What's tablature?
Matt Stead has a lesson on tabulature - I don’t remember which one it is. (It might be the chord-melody one) He uses tab for all his lessons once you start playing specific notes.

(I’m gonna go see if I can find it, brb)

Intermediate 1, and Uke Theory 16 and 17.
 
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From the above link: "In popular music, where the exact arrangement of notes is less important than some other forms, slash chords are generally used only when the specific bass note is important"

At the outset, I would ignore the /F and just play the C chord, but later try adding an F (anywhere you can reach it) and you will hear the intended dissonance. Even with a "low G" 4th string you still cannot create a "bass" F, but may (or may not) like a high one.
 
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You're right, I checked my guitar tab, but it still has something I don't understand. I've attached a pic. Does it make sense? C/F?

Thanks!
👆👆👆👆
what they said. 😄 I hope all the terrific replies cleared the question up Bunny.
 
How should i read the chord notation, Bill?
 
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