Quick question????

Souper

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When you strum a song is it supposed to sound like the melody? I don't think it's supposed too. Thanks
 
Sometimes it will, but generally speaking it will not. The chords you strum are meant to be a background for the melody, which you would sing. There is a style of playing that integrates both chords and melody, and it's a lot of fun if you want to shoot for it.
 
Sometimes it will, but generally speaking it will not. The chords you strum are meant to be a background for the melody, which you would sing. There is a style of playing that integrates both chords and melody, and it's a lot of fun if you want to shoot for it.

What is it called? I would be very interested in it. Thanks
 
Very seldom will the chords sound like the melody - chords are the backing noise/music for the melody/voice.

(I think it is because of this fact that I, personally, find it difficult to sing & strum.)
 
'chorded melodies' sometimes need to be played/strummed according to the melody/rhythm
so that the melody can be easily discerned.

sometimes the chords are 'strummed' by the thumb which brushes all or most of the chorded
strings and also picks out the melody notes.

for the most part, however, strumming to accompany singing practically demands a straight/steady,
tempo-keeping strum. 'tempo-keeping' doesn't necessarily mean heavy downbeat strumming.
Various strumming patterns may be implemented, however, their function, besides providing
interesting rhythm, would be to help maintain the proper tempo as the song is being sung.

my 2 cents :)

keep uke'in',
 
I strum to the rhythm of the lyric, chord melody style. It puts me at odds with a lot of folks but I think it makes for a better tune. Just now I'm using a pick to pick up some of the notes in the chords to advance the lyric.
 
Is a baseball player supposed to throw the ball, catch the ball, or hit the ball?

Like a Chicago Cub World Series Champion, a uke player needs different skills at different times.

If you are accompanying a singer (or another lead instrument) then the usual thing is to play a steady strum on the beat. This allows the uke to fill two important roles at once, providing both the rhythm and the chords. Meanwhile the singer provides the melody. Thus your team is covering all three musical bases: melody, harmonic structure and rhythm.

If you choose instead to strum on the lyrics, then you are doubling up on what the singer is already doing. Which is like having two pitchers and no 1st baseman.

Now of course if we continue to extend this metaphor about the World Champion Chicago Cubs, there are times when the pitcher covers 1st. Sometimes a uke player does not want to strum a steady rhythm. Maybe you're the one playing melody. Maybe you have a drummer. Maybe there's a song (or a section of it) that is sung ad libitum meaning you don't even have a steady rhythm to work with.

The important thing is to choose the style of play that does what you want to do at this point in this song, given the role your ukulele is playing on the team. Nothing is mandatory, but I do think it's a good idea for beginners to learn to keep a steady rhythmic strum because that is a mighty useful skill to have even though you might not use it all the time.
 
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