Season 538 Of The Ukulele - It’s About Tim…

I will take the low hanging fruit, and do a rendition of one of the more well knovn songs he has covered.
It is on the Fiddlers Green album, so a little contribution to the quest of getting as much of that album on th playlist as possible :).

 
Mine is a Canadian accent Rob. Everyone has an accent, just not as cool as yours.
Indeed though sometimes I just exaggerate it. It is strange that Mick Jagger a South london Richmod by sings with an American accent. Part of the Proclaimers charm was to sing with a Scottish regional accent. Chas and Dave sang with a Cockney accent, as did Stanley Holloway, but the vast majority of Europeans miraculously lose their own accent and try to sound American, Bono for example, or Van morrison to a lesser degree.
 
Indeed though sometimes I just exaggerate it. It is strange that Mick Jagger a South london Richmod by sings with an American accent. Part of the Proclaimers charm was to sing with a Scottish regional accent. Chas and Dave sang with a Cockney accent, as did Stanley Holloway, but the vast majority of Europeans miraculously lose their own accent and try to sound American, Bono for example, or Van morrison to a lesser degree.
On the early Beatles records, I always thought that John Lennon used an American accent (especially for Chuck Berry songs)while Paulkept his Liverpool accent in tact.
I recall my brother singing a song called The Merry Minuet in a phony British accent. . . for effect.
Many country singers from the northern states, or even Canada, will use a southern American accent when they perform. They'll even say things like, "I hope y'all enjoy this tune."
 
some driving music!
title taken from Tim O'Brien's 2017 album of the same name
film taken yesterday - a section of the drive south
between Gordon and Verona Sands in Tasmania

 
On the early Beatles records, I always thought that John Lennon used an American accent (especially for Chuck Berry songs)while Paulkept his Liverpool accent in tact.
I recall my brother singing a song called The Merry Minuet in a phony British accent. . . for effect.
Many country singers from the northern states, or even Canada, will use a southern American accent when they perform. They'll even say things like, "I hope y'all enjoy this tune."
When Corb Lund (from Alberta) sings ballads and other slower songs, his CanadIan dialect comes through. But on the fast tempo songs, his accent is almost indistinguishable from midwestern U.S.
 
When Corb Lund (from Alberta) sings ballads and other slower songs, his CanadIan dialect comes through. But on the fast tempo songs, his accent is almost indistinguishable from midwestern U.S.
Corb is a friend of my son Darcy. I really like his music, but have never noticed any change in his accent. I'll listen for it now.
 
Here is one from Del and me:

Fiddler's Green, the title track on Tim's 2005 album. This brings us to 5 tracks from that album!

According to Wikipedia, "Fiddler's Green is an after-life where there is perpetual mirth, a fiddle that never stops playing, and dancers who never tire. In 19th-century English maritime folklore, it was a kind of after-life for sailors who had served at least fifty years at sea."

Many thanks to Del for working his usual magic on this song. You make everything better, Del :- )

 
Hello, Liz and thank you for hosting! Sorry for such a belated arrival this week ... I have been rather distracted and in addition had a doctor's and then a dentist's appointment. But I am now HERE! I have to admit that, before this week, I knew absolutely nothing about Tim O'Brien ... thanks so much for bringing him to our attention; he's a worthy musician. Unfortunately, I'm not! This is a rather silly song from Tim's album, "Hard Year Blues." I absolutely cannot do Bluegrass, but attempted to capture the spirit of the song. (Oh, and I seem to have picked up a copyright claim, so I apologise if I am besieged by adverts.)

 
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Hello all and happy Thursday! Thanks to all who have chimed in over the last day: Rob, Mikkel, Joo (whose post has gone missing...), Jon, Del (with me) and Val. I am thrilled with the response I am getting, seasonistas, thank you so much! I know it was a big ask to go and find out about an artist that might have been unfamiliar to some, but I was hoping that those of you who didn't know Tim's work might enjoy it. Keep 'em coming, please...

Here is another of my favorites from the Cornbread Nation album, which, incidentally, was realeased at the same time as Fiddler's Green, 2005:

 
Here ya go, Ms Liz, one Tim song.

 
Managed to make a three minute song into nearly six and it probably sounds nothing like the original. I managed to call it "Looking" instead of "Look" on the fillum as well !!

But I just came from bobbing about in a boat this morning and on seeing this weeks subject I thought I'd have a go at Mr O'Brien and jolly glad I did too.

This one leapt out at me,as did Buffalo Skinners, Fiddlers Green and Farewell Angelina !! I'm supposed to be doing dobey and getting ready to going back to bobbing about you know, not trying out brand new artists.😇

 
What a fun challenge Liz! Thank you for your work in hosting and for the stuff you put on here. I was not familiar with Tim's work except where I may have accidentally come across it. I found a song from Hot Rize that was very fun to learn. I'm also working on making web content for my grandkids and this gave me a good chance to practice.
 
When garbage band filters run riot. I have found like Dylan when he went electric that there are a lot of ukulele purists who take exception to making any modification to the classical way that ukuleles are supposed to sound. Countless times I have heard it would be great with a little less echo or reverb. Au naturel this is not.
 
I listened to some of Tim O'Brien's songs (I have never heard of him), I liked many of the songs but I don't have time to learn a new song so I found this one was listed as something he had covered.

 
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