Season 624 - My Hero/es

Improvising a 1 minute song from a book of poems by Leonard Cohen


Saturday morning sitting at the table
where I wrote the tower of song
Saturday morning I've got nothing going
all my secrets told to the pillow
like a teenage girl in a Motown song
like a teenage girl in a motown song
 
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Hello again, Del! I bring you a great song from 1962 - well, obviously, not my version! - written by Bob Gaudio and, apparently, originally entitled, "Jackie Baby," in honour of then First Lady, Jackie Kennedy. The studio changed the title to "Terri Baby" and it eventually became "Sherry." Gaudio said that he was inspired to write the song by Bruce Channel's "Hey Baby," written a year earlier.

 
Hello everyone and thanks for hostingDel.
I have always admired The Beatles for their ease in writing wonderful songs that seem to become even more beautiful as the years go by and above all for all the innovative ideas that the songs themselves were full of.
For this reason they are the first group I thought of this week.
I present to you an arrangement of a song from the 1965 album Rubber Soul. It is called You won't see me.
Hope you like it. Greetings everyone

 
Brian ukefoote has already given us one David Bowie song, and I'm going all in and nominating him as my musical hero.
When David Bowie died, a school friend of mine, and a fellow fan, said how lucky we were, given the size and age of the universe, and the vast number of planets which could contain life, that we were teenagers on this planet at the exact moment that Bowie released Ziggy Stardust.


Sound like you could have gone to the same high school as me!
 
Hey Del,
What was I thinking? Did you know old Willie Nelson just turned 92? Do you realize just how many great songs he's written? How about Crazy, for example. Sure, I covered a lot of Dylan songs, but Willie, he's also a true musical legend. Why am I saying all this? It's because My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys just popped into my head. (If you allow me a pass on this, I'll one day tell you the true story about how I made old Willie sing for me. The beer is my treat too.)

 
This time, not a Fats Waller original, but one where his performance is very memorable - and until the likes of Barry Manilow and Paul McCartney perhaps the best known. The earliest recording might also be Fats Waller.

 
Thanks for hosting Del! Cat Stevens album "Tea for the Tillerman" really had a big impact on my life. I think I was 17 or 18 the first time I heard it. I've been a big fan of his songs and simple production ever since! This song encouraged me to pick up the guitar and learn to play so I could sing it. While my life has taken many twists and turns, including decades where I didn't play or sing much, music has always been an important part of my life. It's worth mentioning that watching and hearing Iz' video of Somewhere Over the Rainbow had a similar impact and encouraged me to buy my first ukulele in 2016. He would have been my second choice just for waking up the desire to get back into playing and singing again. Cheers ~

 
Here's a well known one. Can't believe these songs are over 50 years old.
If anyone is interested I've got a link to my online art site in the youtube description. Not looking for sales here just any eyeballs will help with algorithm...over 300,000 paintings on this Australian art site so getting seen is like a needle in a Van Goughian hay stack:)
 
I've been scratching my head for this one.
Me too!! Until I realized... duh...
I have always admired The Beatles for their ease in writing wonderful songs that seem to become even more beautiful as the years go by and above all for all the innovative ideas that the songs themselves were full of.
They have a couple that are my go-to's, but I wanted to focus on John. I'll be bringing one I always go back to a little later, but for now, it's one that was long overdue to get in my repertoire. Had a real pleasure learning this one tonight. Thanks for hosting and the great theme, Del! Here goes my take on 'In My Life.'

 
A bit more Bowie. It's fair to say he became my hero at an impressionable age - 13ish - but he stayed with me for years, because every album was different, and unlike many he didn't just churn out more of the same. I'll be honest - it did go a bit squiffy around the time of Glass Spider and the Tin Machine years, but he pulled things back later on. But from Hunky Dory through to Let's Dance, he hardly put a foot wrong. Here's one from that latter one.

 
Thanks for hosting Del! Cat Stevens album "Tea for the Tillerman" really had a big impact on my life. I think I was 17 or 18 the first time I heard it. I've been a big fan of his songs and simple production ever since! This song encouraged me to pick up the guitar and learn to play so I could sing it. While my life has taken many twists and turns, including decades where I didn't play or sing much, music has always been an important part of my life. It's worth mentioning that watching and hearing Iz' video of Somewhere Over the Rainbow had a similar impact and encouraged me to buy my first ukulele in 2016. He would have been my second choice just for waking up the desire to get back into playing and singing again. Cheers ~


Really good bring! Cat Stevens has some great ones. Harold and Maude is one of my favorite movies and the Cat Stevens filled soundtrack really adds to the film. I hope to catch him live someday!!!
 
Mister Bojangles
Thank you for hosting, Del!
The members of Nitty Gritty Dirt Band (including Jackson Browne) remain near the top of my long list of musical heroes. And, though this timeless tune was penned by yet another of my heroes, Jerry Jeff Walker, I mention JJW secondly because I’ve long savored the cover version by NGDB, as it appeared on the same great album as Jimmy Ibbotson’s joyful ballad, “Dance Little Jean”.

[Background hum is an electric heater.]

Below is my much- marked- up version of Jim Carrey’s Key of F chord sheet.
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Hi Del! Thanks for hosting a great season.

I could pick many who've inspired me, but I chose the musician who got me out of the world of loud rock and roll and took me to a different time and place: Leon Redbone. His first performance on Saturday Night Live (1975?6?) was unlike anything I had seen. He was a true eccentric, but also a wonderful guitar player. So ... here's a song Fats Waller popularized and Ol' Redbone interpreted as only he could.

 
Here is my contribution this week. It is a song in praise of the "Local Heroes" who add so much colour to our lives through their art (whatever form that takes). It was written a couple of years back and forms a part of the current repertory of our band: "The Saturday Blues Project" - it will appear in a far superior arrangement on our next album. However, I couldn't not do my own version (with the help of Band in a Box) given this week's theme, now, could I?

Hope you enjoy:



PS The still photo that acts as an intro to this song is from the Pirate Day in North Wales and shows my brother, his wife and one of their mates from the Amateur Dramatics group that they run in Prestatyn.
 
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