Season 625 - This Season is for the Birds

Yes, I always thought a runcible spoon was a big serving spoon with holes in 👍
Runcible" is a pseudoword invented by Edward Lear. The word appears (as an adjective) several times in his works, most famously as the "runcible spoon" used by the Owl and the Pussycat. The word "runcible" was apparently one of Lear's favourite inventions, appearing in several of his works in reference to a number of different objects. In his verse self-portrait, The Self-Portrait of the Laureate of Nonsense, it is noted that "he weareth a runcible hat".
 
Hello again, Amanda! I came across this song yesterday when I was investigating songs about birds. I have never been to Australia, but I have a - very - distant memory of a book given to me by the lady next door when I was about three; it was a story about a kookaburra. (I can't remember the story at all, but I can see the book cover as though I had it in my hand yesterday and I can even remember the name of the elderly lady who gave it to me ... it was a Miss Talcot.) SO ... herewith is a song about a kookaburra! (There is an out-take at the end ... I had just started recording when my evil cat, Seamus, suddenly appeared in front of me with an animal in his mouth. It was a vole, still very much alive, and I was able to rescue it ... but I was IN SHOCK!)

 
Thank you for hosting Emba. I guess this one was bound to be here somewhere. And why not. McCartney at his best. Incidentally, I had some problems with my old YT channel, so I started a new one. So PG Uke ( as I plan on doing piano and guitar vids on there too) is me, the artist formerly known as etc…
 
Err... is it stretching it to play songs by the Byrds? My underused new 8 string is whispering to me.
 
Err... is it stretching it to play songs by the Byrds? My underused new 8 string is whispering to me.
I think that would be fine! Stretching it, maybe, but I’ll take it.
 
Hey, Amanda

It's been a while since I was here. Thanks for hosting!

Here's a song I wrote last summer which has become a fixture in the Wood Street Dogs' live set but I've never recorded it until now.
On the 1st of September 1914, Martha the last Passenger Pigeon died in Cincinnati Zoo. This one's for her...

(I've included the lyrics/chords in the youtube description if anyone feels the urge to play along. I'm playing with a capo on the first fret, btw...)

 
MY BLUE HEAVEN - Walter Donaldson & George A. Whiting 1927

"When whippoorwills call. . ."

Thanks for hosting Amanda and for chosing a topic that has a lot of cool choices. I've tried My Blue Heaven twice at the Saturday open mic Zoom and have goofed it up both times, but it seems that YouTube allows Do-overs if you make a mistake (although I often don't take advantage of this)

 
I needed a song with a bird, so I dug up this old thing which mentions a raven. I wrote it on guitar but haven't played it for a long time, and had never played it on ukulele before. And now that I have, I think I will play this one more often.

Here's a little oddity with the translation to uke (at least it surprised me) - guitar and ukulele are tuned differently and have a different number of strings, as y'all know. However, for the ukulele version I play it exactly the same way I do on guitar! Same chord shapes & finger positions, pluck the same strings. The one small difference is that I think I plunk around on the 5th string (A) in the "chorus" on guitar, but on uke I just did that on the last string available, G, instead. So it's in a different key, but I play it the same way. I wish it was always so straightforward!

 
Runcible" is a pseudoword invented by Edward Lear. The word appears (as an adjective) several times in his works, most famously as the "runcible spoon" used by the Owl and the Pussycat. The word "runcible" was apparently one of Lear's favourite inventions, appearing in several of his works in reference to a number of different objects. In his verse self-portrait, The Self-Portrait of the Laureate of Nonsense, it is noted that "he weareth a runcible hat".
True, Lear didn't invent the word to be used solely to describe a spoon, but it seems to have been adopted to describe a serated spoon or a concave fork. They are apparently quite usefull for eating mince and slices of quince.

Runcible-spoon.jpg

runcible spoon.jpg
 
True, Lear didn't invent the word to be used solely to describe a spoon, but it seems to have been adopted to describe a serated spoon or a concave fork. They are apparently quite usefull for eating mince and slices of quince.

View attachment 165749

View attachment 165750
I read that one of the tines of the fork part had a serrated edge so it could act as a knife for cutting... so it was a combination of a knife, fork, and spoon.
 
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