Season 627 - It's 3/4 Time!

6/8 is compound meter, two dotted crotchets (2*3/8 notes), therefore two beats to the bar. 1 & a, 2 & a, etc.
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Waltz is simple meter, 1 2 3, 1 2 3, etc.
Adding a dot to a note extends its value by half as much again. So a dotted quarter note = 1/4 + 1/8 -- i.e., 3/8. Two 3/8 notes to a bar = 6/8 🤓
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And sorry ... I WILL go away, Ylle; I promise!!! But I just came across this and it is priceless, as well as very relevant to the week ... the "Hesitation Waltz," danced by a man in white tie and tails, whose top hat keeps disappearing and reappearing in the course of the dance, and a woman who looks as though a bird has just flown into her head:

 
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Originally published as "The Flying Trapeze" in 1868, by the early 1900s it had become a vaudeville standard known more commonly as "The Man On the Flying Trapeze." Originally with 5 stanzas, I omitted #2 when I made my arrangement because it seemed too superfluous, and then omitted #3 for this recording. The three stanzas I used still tell the whole story. So this is 3/5 of a 3/4 song. They probably didn't use the whole thing in vaudeville anyway because they liked to be able to do two or three short songs in a 7- or 8-minute routine rather than one long song. Studying various versions of this and comparing them to the original music from 1868 was a big part in clueing me in to the nefarious shenanigans of Calumet Music Publishing (previously mentioned). This was a song that I learned to play on a little reed organ we had when I was a kid, but the organ book had only the first stanza and chorus. It also had more "modernized" language, so that instead of "purloined away" it had "stolen away." So every time I get that to part it makes me smile a little bit. I did a commentary video on this song and that old reed organ; I'll put the link below for anyone who is interested. Also I'm including the lyrics except for that one stanza that I didn't use from the original as a courtesy for Ylle.



Once I was happy but now I'm forlorn,
Like an old coat that is tattered and torn,
Left in this wide world to weep and to mourn;
Betrayed by a maid in her teens.
Now this girl that I loved, she was handsome
And I tried all I knew, her to please
But I never could please her one-quarter so well,
As the man on the flying trapeze.

(chorus)
He'd float thru the air with the greatest of ease,
The daring young man on the flying trapeze,
His movements are graceful, all girls he does please,
And my love he has purloined away.

(omitted)
Her Father and Mother were both on my side,
and very hard tried to make her my own bride,
Her Father he sighed and her Mother she cried;
To see her throw herself away.
'Twas all no avail, she went there ev'ry night,
To see him perform on the stage.
Which caused him to meet her, how he ran me down,
To tell it would take a whole page.

(chorus)

One night I as usual went to her dear home,
Found there her Father and Mother alone,
I asked for my love and soon 'twas made known,
To my horror that she'd run away.
She'd packed up her boxes, eloped in the night,
With him with the greatest of ease.
Some two stories he had lowered her down,
To ground on his flying trapeze.

(chorus)

Some months after that I went into a hall,
To my surprise I found there on the wall,
A bill in red letters which did my heart gall:
That she was appearing with him.
He'd taught her gymnastics, and dressed her in tights
To help him to live at his ease.
He'd made her assume a masculine name,
And now she goes on the trapeze.

(final chorus)
She floats thru the air with the greatest of ease,
You'd think her a man on the flying trapeze,
She does all the work while he takes his ease,
And that's what became of my love.

 
I spent half my schooldays being rubbish at Maths!
MATHS!!!! I love that.
Do you not teach mathematics in the US ? Or is it mathematic ? I always used to boggle at the term "math" when I was reading my peanuts books in the 60s and 70 s.....sorry and 60 and 70
Sorry if this comment is out of place, but I can't resist pointing out that both forms are standard English. The earliest abbreviated version of "mathematics" was "math," first recorded in 1847; the plural "maths" appeared in 1911. In American usage, the earlier "math" persisted while in British usage the plural is now preferred. In short, "math" preceded "maths" by 64 years; do the math.

It's best not to sneer at another's English without checking the facts.
 
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Sorry if this comment is out of place, but I can't resist pointing out that both forms are standard English. The earliest abbreviated version of "mathematics" was "math," first recorded in 1847; the plural "maths" appeared in 1911. In American usage, the earlier "math" persisted while in British usage the plural is now preferred. In short, "math" preceded "maths" by 64 years; do the math.

It's best not to sneer at another's English without checking the facts.
Would it be "maths" if we're talking about trigonometry, algebra, geometry. . .? These are maths.
 
Sorry if this comment is out of place, but I can't resist pointing out that both forms are standard English. The earliest abbreviated version of "mathematics" was "math," first recorded in 1847; the plural "maths" appeared in 1911. In American usage, the earlier "math" persisted while in British usage the plural is now preferred. In short, "math" preceded "maths" by 64 years; do the math.

It's best not to sneer at another's English without checking the facts.
No ... it's "Maths!":D
 
Beautiful, Beautiful Brown Eyes - Alton Delmore, Arthur Smith & Jerry Capehart

A story that I can't remember, but my mom has told me is that when I was a pre-schooler with blue eyes, I heard her singing the chorus to this waltz and I burst into tears. OK Mom, it might have happened, but...
This one actually qualifies for both seasons that are still open today.

 
"It came across as a sneer: “Do you not teach mathematics in the US ? Or is it mathematic.” Sorry if I misinterpreted."

It wasn't ,you did. As George Bernard Shaw said: "England and America are two countries separated by a common language"
 
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It came across as a sneer: “Do you not teach mathematics in the US ? Or is it mathematic.” Sorry if I misinterpreted.
It was called "arithmetic" all through elementary school, and turned to "Math" in junior high school.

I've since been told (and I don't know the truth of the explanation) that the four basic functions - addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division - are arithmetic, and everything else it Math, and that all of it together is "Mathematics".

OK.

I never heard the term "maths" until I was watching some British film in the 1990s...
 
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