Season 627 - It's 3/4 Time!

My old professor at university would be trying to solve a problem at the blackboard and getting into a real mess. When he failed miserably he would vigourously scrub everything off the board and say let's approach the problem with complex numbers.

Now you know you are about to engage in some mental gymnastics when you discover that i is √-1 cos you have always been taught you can never have the square root of a negitive number.

Tread softy when mathematics becomes metaphysical... your problems are bigger than calling the thing you are studying maths or math.
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One thing I like about having a baritone uke as well as the standard size ones you can just take a chord chart for a tenor and use the same shapes on a baritone for a different key and feel. Here I'm using a tenor chord chart in Dm but using the same shapes on a baritone, So i'm singing in Am but in this case I'm Am an octave above the tenor Dm. So I can sing high and whiny :). Some added garageband " dreamy bells".
 
The earliest abbreviated version of "mathematics" was "math," first recorded in 1847; the plural "maths" appeared in 1911. In American usage, the earlier "math" persisted while in British usage the plural is now preferred. In short, "math" preceded "maths" by 64 years; do the math.
My understanding is that there are only so many S’s available and in America the decision was made to take the S off the end of “Maths” and stick it onto “Lego” instead 😁
 
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My understanding is that there are only so many S’s available and in America the decision was made to take the S off the end of “Maths” and stick it onto “Lego” instead 😉
The same thing has happened with “u”. I wrote a letter to my American pen friend and told her my Favourite Colour was Blue. She wrote back “ Don’t you mean Ble?”
 
The same thing has happened with “u”. I wrote a letter to my American pen friend and told her my Favourite Colour was Blue. She wrote back “ Don’t you mean Ble?”
My apologies ... I seem to have stirred up a hornets' nest by talking about my signal failure to grasp the complexities of "Maths"; I should have said "Arithmetic." But, no ... I was GOOD at Arithmetic; I just couldn't do Maths! I found an interesting article which, to some extent, explains the reasons for the differences between British English and American English. One thing I learnt from it is that on the other side of the Pond you actually have "aluminUM" - I always thought that you were just mispronouncing "aluminIUM!" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_American_and_British_English
 
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My understanding is that there are only so many S’s available and in America the decision was made to take the S off the end of “Maths” and stick it onto “Lego” instead 😁
I was explaining the Math/Maths question to my wife and she said now she understands why I insist on calling Cliff Richard, Cliff Richards... apparently the Europeans have stolen the majority of "s" from America, and append them to the words to make them more appealing.
 
SENIOR VERSION of my favourite things.



Botox and nose drops and needles for knitting,
Walkers and handrails and new dental fittings,
Bundles of magazines tied up in string,
These are a few of my favourite things.
Cadillacs and cataracts and hearing aids and glasses,
Polident and Fixodent and false teeth in glasses,
Pacemakers, golf carts and porches with swings,
These are a few of my favourite things.
When the pipes leak, When the bones creak,
When the knees go bad,
I simply remember my favourite things,
And then I don't feel so bad.
 
I have never heard a dotted quarter note called a 3/8 note. Is that really a thing?
Sorry, I clearly didn't explain myself clearly. It's not a thing, but just a summation, made for explanatory purposes (as to why/how 6/8 divides into two dotted quarter notes per measure). A dotted quarter note has a value of 3/8, but it's not a single 'entity': it's still two separate notes joined together.

Thinking about it, I suppose that if there was such a thing as a 3/8 note, you wouldn't be able to call 6/8 a compound meter.
 
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My apologies ... I seem to have stirred up a hornets' nest by talking about my signal failure to grasp the complexities of "Maths"; I should have said "Arithmetic." But, no ... I was GOOD at Arithmetic; I just couldn't do Maths! I found an interesting article which, to some extent, explains the reasons for the differences between British English and American English. One thing I learnt from it is that on the other side of the Pond you actually have "aluminUM" - I always thought that you were just mispronouncing "aluminIUM!" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_American_and_British_English
Canadian school children are taught to leave the "u" in colour, honour... and we spell recognise, authorise with an "s" rather than a "z" (although American Spellcheck is converting younger Canucks)
We do have "aluminum" in common with the Americans.
I was always taught that "practice" is a noun and "practise" is a verb, but I've noticed that many folks use "practice for both.
Wow! Sorry Ylle. I'm done and back to enjoying a wonderful season of waltzes.
 
And sorry ... I WILL go away, Ylle; I promise!!! But I just came across this and it is priceless, as well as very relevant to the week ... the "Hesitation Waltz," danced by a man in white tie and tails, whose top hat keeps disappearing and reappearing in the course of the dance, and a woman who looks as though a bird has just flown into her head:
I liked the 'peek-a-boos' at around 2:45...

And with 12/8 time: I simplify it as 4 triplets over 4 beats, which, when played slowly, could sound like a waltz. Or a jig, when played quickly.

Slow:
dah-dah-dah
dah-dah-dah
dah-dah-dah
dah-dah-dah

Fast
dadola-dadola-dadola-dadola
 
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Hello Seasonistas! Thank you for your first fine songs and for an interesting discussion re: math(s) and music. It looks like "3/4 time" is not as simple and straightforward as one might think. But during this Season, we can round the numbers and use the famous Thornton rule: the song qualifies, if the performer says so. Anyway, "3.002/3.999 time" is practically "3/4 time". :)

The playlist is up to date. 🎶
 
WALTZ TIME KEEPS TICKIN' AWAY - Willie P. Bennett

Willie performed this as a part of WALTZ TIME MEDLEY on his Heartstrings CD. I can't recall how he joined them and I've lost or loned my copy of his CD and it's not on YouTube.
Our furnace broke down on Saturday and it's not worth fixing, so until Tuesday, we are bundling upo and living with space heaters. This room is not heated and is about 12 degrees C, so I'm not gonna do a bunch of takes today.
I love waltzes Ylle, so I'll get a few in this season.

 
This song is in 3/4 but has kind of a lurching rhythm that doesn't come across as a waltz.



When life seems gray and dark the dawn and you are blue,
There is they say on such a morn one thing to do.
Rise up and ring, a bellboy call to you straightway,
And bid him bring a cold and tall absinthe frappè.

(chorus)
It will free you first from the burning thirst
That is born of a night of the bowl,
Like a sun 'twill rise through the inky skies
That so heavily hang o'er your soul.
At the first cool sip on your fevered lip
You determine to live through the day,
Life's again worth while as with dawning smile
You imbibe your absinthe frappè.

The deed is done so waste no woe o'er yestere'en.
Nor swear to shun a year or so the festive scene.
Remorse will pass despair will fade with speed away
Before a glass of rightly made absinthe frappè.

(chorus)
 
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