Song Help Request Slash Chords

stikman

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I have the guitar chords for Dan Zanes Firefly and it has the slach chords C/B and Am/G. Does any one know the shapes for these on the standard tuned uke? I am thinking Cmaj7 would work for the first one but there might be a better one.
 
Slash chords are are a challenge on uke since they're usually designed to move the bass around on guitar. So really you have to add the bass (slash) note higher in the chord. So yeah - Cmaj7 would work for C/B, and Am7 for Am/G.
If they're passing from say C to C/B or Am to Am/G, try and use a chord where you hear that note moving eg C (0003) Cmaj7 (0002) or Am (2000) to Am7 (2030)

Too much info?

Bertie
 
I find it easiest just to drop the 2nd chord.. so for c/b I'd just play c.

That's definitely easier, brainwise. But in cases where the note in the bottom of the slash isn't a note in the chord on top of the slash, it's good to add it in there somewhere, if possible.

For example, the notes in a C major chord are C, E, and G.

So for a C/E, you can more easily ignore the bottom part (the 'E'), because you've already got an E in the chord that's dictated on top. It's not the lowest note in that chord, which is the idea behind slash chords, but that doesn't matter so much on the uke.

But for a C/B, that bottom note (the 'B') isn't in a C chord. So for full effect, you'd have to add it in there.

The notes C, E, and G (from the normal C chord) plus the added B, happen to make a Cmaj7. That's just as easy to play as a regular C, so I say go for it!

Ditto for the Am/G. An Am chord is A, C, and E. Note the lack of G.

If you add the G in there, you've got an Am7, which is actually easier to play than a regular Am. Huzzah!

JJ
 
That's definitely easier, brainwise. But in cases where the note in the bottom of the slash isn't a note in the chord on top of the slash, it's good to add it in there somewhere, if possible.

For example, the notes in a C major chord are C, E, and G.

So for a C/E, you can more easily ignore the bottom part (the 'E'), because you've already got an E in the chord that's dictated on top. It's not the lowest note in that chord, which is the idea behind slash chords, but that doesn't matter so much on the uke.

But for a C/B, that bottom note (the 'B') isn't in a C chord. So for full effect, you'd have to add it in there.

The notes C, E, and G (from the normal C chord) plus the added B, happen to make a Cmaj7. That's just as easy to play as a regular C, so I say go for it!

Ditto for the Am/G. An Am chord is A, C, and E. Note the lack of G.

If you add the G in there, you've got an Am7, which is actually easier to play than a regular Am. Huzzah!

JJ


If someone who understands all this .. ( * cough JJ cough * ) could put out a chart to show which chord work best in place of each slash chord.. that would rock!


:)
 
I suppose that would be simple enough if the person reading it knows the notes of each string at each fret. :)

...And knew the root of each chord (and what the root of a chord means) :)

This is Just lazy ole me looking for a simple chart to tell me what chord to strum :)
 
If someone who understands all this .. ( * cough JJ cough * ) could put out a chart to show which chord work best in place of each slash chord.. that would rock!

That's actually a pretty good idea. But as I sat to start typing one up, I realized something... there is a metric crap-ton of possible slash chords! :eek:

In the end, I think it probably is better to just learn a teeny bit o' theory, so that you can just figure it all out.

For example, if you're faced with a C/B, then you just need to know:

  1. B is the seventh note in the C major scale
  2. All maj7 chords are made up of a regular major triad, plus the seventh note from that chord's major scale
  3. Therefore, a C major triad plus a B note equals a Cmaj7 chord

In other words, once you know (or have a chart for) your common major scales, and know (or have a chart for) the formulas by which the most common chords are constructed, then you're home free.

JJ
 
Slash chords are generally not as useful with an ukulele mostly because the uke is such a soprano instrument. Especially when youre using re-entrant tuning, it becomes hard to hear the bass of the uke. I generally just disregard the slash chords just because it usually sounds good enough without it. Sometimes though, slash chords add more character to the song. A good example is Jason Mraz's Lucky. There is a part in the chorus where the chords are C then C/B. I have a low-g tuning so if I play c as 5433, I can then go to 4433. It would sound good enough without the extra note, but it adds a bit more color in my opinion.
 
Well, if you were to click C, you'd end up HERE

And the simplest chord for C (I'm assuming 0003) is there under C/G...is that what you're referring to?

isn't 0003 the accepted 1st position "c" chord?

and 0232 the accepted 1st position "g" chord?

Just sayin'

:)
 
Thanks

Thanks for the replies. I regret getting distracted and not coming back until now. I think just dropping the bass note is a good idea and works fine however, in this instance the progression loses something. The progression is:

C C/B Am A/G F G

So what I've been doing is playing Cmaj7 for the C/B and for the A/G I bar at the 2nd fret and play the 3rd fret E string so it makes a G with a high A. Not quite the same effect as the slash chord but satisfying in that it gives the walkdown flavor to it that you get with a guitar.

Thanks for all the input.
 
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