Solution for broken slotted bridge.

UkingViking

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So,

On this old Kamaka Tiki, knots are going through the slots. At least the A string, the G string looks prone too. And the wood is fraying where they go through.

It seems that there is a shared space for the knots in this design, rather than four individual.
Has anyone tried tying all the strings to some kind of bar or hairpin before letting them through the slots on a design like this?
I suspect it might distribute force better than a bead. And if people use beads, what kind?
I would rather prefer something that will fit behind the bridge without prying it upwards. So beads would need to be very small, perhaps 2-3 mm.


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You can definitely find beads that will fit under there without pulling up the bridge -- I've used them on a similar bridge design -- the only issue was that glass beads can break under pressure apparently -- I had one pop/shatter on me while re-stringing... you can probably find metal beads of the same size at a hobby store like Michael's...
 
Or on that design you could use a short length of C (or low G) string for each string or, like you mentioned, a single length across all four.

When stringing my wife's Celtic harp I always used a short chunk of large diameter gut string as a stop, as per the harp maker's recommendations.
 
Or on that design you could use a short length of C (or low G) string for each string or, like you mentioned, a single length across all four.

When stringing my wife's Celtic harp I always used a short chunk of large diameter gut string as a stop, as per the harp maker's recommendations.

Thanks, I might try that!
 
You can definitely find beads that will fit under there without pulling up the bridge -- I've used them on a similar bridge design -- the only issue was that glass beads can break under pressure apparently -- I had one pop/shatter on me while re-stringing... you can probably find metal beads of the same size at a hobby store like Michael's...

Thanks, if I find myself near a hobby store I will check out their bead selection.
 
These might work for your bridge - No more knots, the string locks into the block.
They are 4.5 mm high, string comes out of the front.

 
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These might work for your bridge - No more knots, the string locks into the block.
They are 4.5 mm high, string comes out of the front.


These will not work, I am afraid.
I am not trying to avoid tying knots on a tie bar, just want to secure the strings behind the slots with something that can be concealed in the 2-3 mm space available.
 
My last idea - Some hobby shops have various ABS and styrene plastic stock made mainly for scratch building model railroad scenery and dioramas. They may have a solid strip the right width that you could cut to length and drill four holes. Use without holes, or they have round rod in different diameters. Most of what I've seen is white or gray, long enough for 4-5 pieces.
 
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A nice old Kamaka deserves a proper repair. Surely one of our friendly neighborhood luthiers has seen this before and has a good fix. Maybe the damage can be rebuilt with epoxy or another filler. I have no clue.
 
A nice old Kamaka deserves a proper repair. Surely one of our friendly neighborhood luthiers has seen this before and has a good fix. Maybe the damage can be rebuilt with epoxy or another filler. I have no clue.

Thanks,

The damage is not very visible. Due to my minor dislike for slotted bridges, because of issues like this, I was mostly looking for the ideal thing to tie the A and perhaps G string to, to prevent any further issues. I think the wider string solution apparently tested on harps could be a contender, I just need to find the time and string.

If I knew where to find a friendly neighborhood luthier, I might have seen about that tiny crack the Ukulele has. 🤔
 
Update:
I found these tiny Japanese glass beads with two holes in an arts and craft store. I hope they dont break, they seem pretty easy to tie the string to.
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