Song Dex Twin Key Ukulele Chart

UkeOkay

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This has been handy, but it’s been disintegrating since well before I found it in a stash in my parent’s house 30 odd years ago. I’ve started to make a new version, as even my photocopy is wearing out. its low on my prior list, but I’ll post it here once it’s done.

This has a 1953 copyright, I think it’s safe to assume there aren’t many copies around.

IMG_0541.jpeg


IMG_0542.jpeg
 
That's so slick! I love it!

What's the "Twin Key" a reference to? I'm assuming that it's more than just a clever pun on a golden sponge cake?
 
Tim: April 6, 1930 in Schiller Park, IL

UkeOkay: Thanks for saving preserving and sharing this!
I downloaded your photos so I could zoom in and found on the back side a small treasury of chord sequences with intros and endings.

<edit> On the front page, one could create a similar chart for gCEA to DGBE tunings.
To do this change the last column to G, then G#, and fill in the rest.
Playing a gCEA shape "C" on a DGBE baritone results in a "G" chord.
 
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Tim: April 6, 1930 in Schiller Park, IL

UkeOkay: Thanks for saving preserving and sharing this!
I downloaded your photos so I could zoom in and found on the back side a small treasury of chord sequences with intros and endings.

<edit> On the front page, one could create a similar chart for gCEA to DGBE tunings.
To do this change the last column to G, then G#, and fill in the rest.
Playing a gCEA shape "C" on a DGBE baritone results in a "G" chord.
The vamps and tags are fun to play. I’m no showman, but it’s fun to pretend sometimes. The version I’m working on does include the baritone tuning.
 
"Vamp"... Yes! Those cool little licks that embellish a tune. They're not part of the melody, just kinda hang out there to hold it all together.

I first heard that term in a John Hartford song called, "With a Vamp in the Middle."
I had to look it up.

 
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Take this first version (0.1) with a grain of salt - I'm sure there are errors. Plus it's only one side as of yet.

Please let me know if you see errors. (@VintageGibson I haven't checked those two chords yet)

Shout-out to the MusFrets font by Dan Kreider for making this possible (and easy).

The "source", a LibreOffice spreadsheet, is available on GitHub, if you want to fiddle with it.
 

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You should scan the originals. If you do, put a piece of BLACK paper or cardboard on the non-scan side. This will prevent any printing on that side from bleeding though in the scan. You just compensate for the paper color and increase the contrast to get a good B&W version.
 
This is an excellent resource! It helps me understand “the why” in a visual, tactile way. Thank you for posting! Not sure how I missed this post when it appeared 3 months ago.
 
"Vamp"... Yes! Those cool little licks that embellish a tune. They're not part of the melody, just kinda hang out there to hold it all together.

I first heard that term in a John Hartford song called, "With a Vamp in the Middle."
I had to look it up.


I googled this because, even after watching the great JH clip, I remained confused. Coming from a banjo background, my concept of “vamp” always ended in “-ing” which was how a banjoist plays backup when a guitarist or mandolinist takes a lead verse. However, until I looked it up, I wasn’t aware that it’s technically still a “vamp” if the banjoist plucks high- fret rolls while playing backup for a fiddle, resonator guitar or vocalist.

Interestingly, and please pardon me for being redundant to those with a far greater extent of public performance experience than my own, “safety bar” is a similar concept.
 
I googled this because, even after watching the great JH clip, I remained confused. Coming from a banjo background, my concept of “vamp” always ended in “-ing” which was how a banjoist plays backup when a guitarist or mandolinist takes a lead verse. However, until I looked it up, I wasn’t aware that it’s technically still a “vamp” if the banjoist plucks high- fret rolls while playing backup for a fiddle, resonator guitar or vocalist.

Interestingly, and please pardon me for being redundant to those with a far greater extent of public performance experience than my own, “safety bar” is a similar concept.
Plus, there's the double entendre...
 
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