String changing

Remmurts

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Restring one at a time, or remove all old strings and then replace?
 
Depends.

If you restring often, then one at a time is fine. I work from the middle out. To keep the tension on the bridge as equal as possible. But that's my little quirk. No real reason to do that because the tension isn't all that great.

All at once if you're going to also recondition the fretboard, and/or bridge; replace a pickup battery; or dust and clean the sound board (top).
If you do all of the strings, first mark the saddle with a sharp pencil on the side that faces the nut. (Headstock/tuners.) Then make sure you remove the saddle over a table with a towel or mat underneath to catch it if it falls. With a mark on the saddle, you'll always be sure you're putting it back facing the same way it was when you removed it.

If you're replacing a uke with a string through bridge, you may want to do them all together so that it's easier to turn the uke upside down to fish out the strings all at once. And then fish out the ends of the new strings to tie the knots or add the beads.

I don't think there's any other overriding reason for doing it either way.
 
I usually change them all at once, to give me a chance to dust off the ukulele below the strings while they are off.
But yeah, be prepared that the saddle might fall from the bridge and will need to be put back in place.
 
If you're replacing a uke with a string through bridge, you may want to do them all together so that it's easier to turn the uke upside down to fish out the strings all at once. And then fish out the ends of the new strings to tie the knots or add the beads.
That's what I have to do - at the very least, I have to unwind all the strings to completely loose so I can stick my hand through the hole. I hate string through bridges for this reason. I'd rather have bridge pins if they're through body strung.

I've never even considered the saddle falling out. Thanks for that tip!!!
 
A bit off topic but….. I leave my Aquila red low G (unwound) on longer than the Martin premium 625’s. I change the 625’s once a month and the low G every 3 months. I change strings regularly as I really do notice an improvement in sound and feel quality after a string change. I’m guessing that over time as the string stretches out it becomes thinner, combined with the tiny grooves worn into the string from fret wear the string must loose its performance quality.
 
Restring one at a time, or remove all old strings and then replace?

As a beginner I didn’t know the target octave. Breaking a string from over tightening was startling. 🫢

Switched to one string at a time.

This let me use the sound of old strings to rough tune each new string to the correct octave. 🤗

For linear tuning:
. 4th string (closest to chin) fretted at 5th fret should sound like 3rd string
. 3rd string fretted at 4th fret should sound like 2nd string
. 2nd string fretted at 5th fret should sound like 1st string
. Then switch to electronic tuner.

For re-entrant tuning:
. 4th string (closest to chin) not fretted should sound like 2nd string fretted at 3rd fret
. 3rd string fretted at 4th fret should sound like 2nd string
. 2nd string fretted at 5th fret should sound like 1st string
. Then switch to electronic tuner.

Cheers.
 
At least the first time, might be a good idea to take a photo of bridge (and nut)....to see the string route & knots, assuming it's a tie bridge and if all removed together (NBD for pin, slot and through bridges) and know which way the saddle goes (if it falls out, esp if compensated). Some nuts are not glued in, but I think that is less common.
 
All at once. I always condition the fretboard. I generally change strings every 6 -8 weeks on my Kamaka and every 3 months on my Kanilea. The Kamaka gets played the most.
 
I think it's preference, really. I've done it both ways with no issues!
 
You folks are methodical people. I just cut off old strings with scissors, wipe down the now exposed fretboard with some Dunlop 65 and then restring left to right: G,C, E, A. Lastly, I adjust the A string to a tension and flexibility that I like and then I re-tune the other 3 strings to match the A string. Currently my A string is an F#. This takes about 10 minutes.
 
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