The E- Chord - Is there an alternative?

People, people, don't you know?

The C-chord is the new E-chord! Strum hard and no one will ever notice.

C! :nana: C! :nana: C! :nana:


P.S. F is the new A-chord, and G is the new B-chord. Don't let anyone tell you different.
I'm loving this
 
I've been playing certain chords like E and Fm that require a stretched pinky by just deadening the one offending string. So I'll play an E with index on the G1, ring on A2, and middle deadening the C string in a natural position between them. Sounds good to me and plays and transitions easily. But I never see this suggested. Is it considered bad technique for some reason?
 
I have ignored this thread.

Its like a millstone of unbelief in your own abilities to train your hands to be able to play a particular chord. Even if it does take some repetition training and persistence and self belief to achieve.

Unless you have a medical condition, you can learn and train yourself to play all of the E chord shapes already discussed in this thread. Just stop reading the posts like this thread and get on with the training process.
Good thing, then, that this thread is in the Beginners forum, for people who might be interested in some various shapes options that could work better for them, depending on what transitions they're working on in a specific piece, or what their hands are capable of at this moment, until they can train their fingers to get a different shape on the fly, at tempo, in whatever chord progression they're working on. Good thing, too, that we don't jump all over new UU members for contributing their valid thoughts and experiences to a discussion.

It's impressive what beginners don't know - for example, that there is more than one way to form a chord and that you may wish to learn various ways to give you tools for different situations. I can't imagine why members of a ukulele forum would be interested in having a discussion about a ukulele topic that is, actually, useful to some members of that forum.

[For those of you who may be wondering, yes, your sarcasm meter should be sounding an alarm about now.]

It's also a good thing we do have ignore tool options for those who wish to deploy them.

I've been playing certain chords like E and Fm that require a stretched pinky by just deadening the one offending string. So I'll play an E with index on the G1, ring on A2, and middle deadening the C string in a natural position between them. Sounds good to me and plays and transitions easily. But I never see this suggested. Is it considered bad technique for some reason?
I'm not sure that there is "bad" technique to get notes to sound how you want them. There may be "better" techniques, but if it works consistently for you, and you play musically with it, why not? Thanks for adding another idea!
 
I've searched under E-chord...can't find what I'm looking for.

I guess I'm like most newbies - the E-chord (along with several others needing four fingers) is the chord from hell in terms of finger placement. I'm also pretty certain that short of growing a third hand, I'm not likely to ever get the contortions right!

So My questions are:

1. Is there a harmonic alternative to the E chord? ie what could I get a way with at a push!??

2. Any sneaky tips on finger positions?

3. Suggestions for painless amputations?

Thanks

3-fingered Bill

PS

Shucks ...got my first callous forming....so proud!! It's like a first born! (OK I know ...that's a bit OTT - but you know what I mean!)
Technically speaking
Cm
But
After owning A Ukulele for a week...
Not certain how that works out
Just music theory...
 
The best alternative for the E chord is the Fb chord.
 
I don't know if this is actually a good alternative, but I've been playing it with a finger on all 4 strings at 4th fret.
 
That gives E6 (B E G# C# )
 
That gives E6 (B E G# C# )
If you don't play it as a straight barre, you can use your index for G string, middle for C string, and ring finger for A string. Then if you leave the E string open you have an E chord. If you use the middle finger to fret the C string and dampen the E string, you also get an E chord, but this version will be less ring-y without the E unisons. I actually prefer this version because of that reason and also because it is then a movable major chord. And if you add one finger then you get a dom9, m7b5, or m6 chord, so that with very little movement you can migrate from a major chord to a dominant chord.

One example: 44X4 is E major. 4434 is A9. Move that shape up two frets to 6656 and you have B9. That's all you need to play the blues in E, albeit a bit spicy with those 9 chords. And walking down from the sixth fret to the fourth fret makes a nice turnaround.
 
Last edited:
If you don't play it as a straight barre, you can use your index for G string, middle for C string, and ring finger for A string. Then if you leave the E string open you have an E chord. If you use the middle finger to fret the C string and dampen the E string, you also get an E chord, but this version will be less ring-y without the E unisons. I actually prefer this version because of that reason and also because it is then a movable major chord. And if you add one finger then you get a dom9, m7b5, or m6 chord, so that with very little movement you can migrate from a major chord to a dominant chord.

One example: 44X4 is E major. 4434 is A9. Move that shape up two frets to 6656 and you have B9. That's all you need to play the blues in E, albeit a bit spicy with those 9 chords. And walking down from the sixth fret to the fourth fret makes a nice turnaround.
You got me tinkering around and I discovered that 4445 sounds lovely. E7 according to a chord namer. Is this closer to E major than E6? (I'm disabled and can't do 4434. 44X4 is quite a challenge too.)
 
If you don't play it as a straight barre, you can use your index for G string, middle for C string, and ring finger for A string. Then if you leave the E string open you have an E chord. If you use the middle finger to fret the C string and dampen the E string, you also get an E chord, but this version will be less ring-y without the E unisons. I actually prefer this version because of that reason and also because it is then a movable major chord. And if you add one finger then you get a dom9, m7b5, or m6 chord, so that with very little movement you can migrate from a major chord to a dominant chord.

One example: 44X4 is E major. 4434 is A9. Move that shape up two frets to 6656 and you have B9. That's all you need to play the blues in E, albeit a bit spicy with those 9 chords. And walking down from the sixth fret to the fourth fret makes a nice turnaround.
A bit tricky. I prefer 4447 or even the normal E
 
4447 is easier than 4442. Easiest for me is to play 444x, with stopping at the A string, so muting is not needed. (the 2 on the A string is the same note as the 4 on the G string.
 
You got me tinkering around and I discovered that 4445 sounds lovely. E7 according to a chord namer. Is this closer to E major than E6? (I'm disabled and can't do 4434. 44X4 is quite a challenge too.)
Probably 95% of average uke players substitute the dominant E7 1202 for an Emajor. I think that this thread is for those who want to break away from substitutions and play the real thing. The 4447 is easy barre but the high E often sounds out of place if chords before and after don't have notes of similar pitch. Lots of practice to get a clean 4442 is probably best option.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom