The F7 Chord

That is a golden nugget!

(Thanks for pointing out what I was lacking. I now need to review the rest of my "7s" for missing 4th notes :)
 
I am so happy that you found it useful, @Wiggy !! The "chord book F7" is the only one I know of with a missing note (with the exception of the "Hawaiian D7" which is lacking the tonic D note) but I would be interested to hear if anybody finds more.
 
SUPER! Thanks for covering this! So much goodness here (especially that moveable chord shape, gotta love those!)

ETA - actually!!! I just found a song that used a horribly awkward F#7 that I was groaning over trying to extract from my fingers, and THIS will nail it beautifully and easily, thanks so much Yukio :love:
 
Yeah, the four finger F7 is a moveable E7 shape. Like all four finger chords, they become very useful... once one can get the dexterity to form it quick enough.

There are many chords on the ukulele missing a note to be "proper". But I cannot name one offhand (lol) since I don't think that way when I play. I tend to be a good sheep and play off tabs.
 
Yeah, the four finger F7 is a moveable E7 shape. Like all four finger chords, they become very useful... once one can get the dexterity to form it quick enough.

There are many chords on the ukulele missing a note to be "proper". But I cannot name one offhand (lol) since I don't think that way when I play. I tend to be a good sheep and play off tabs.
Totally agree. All chord "extensions" (Those that add a note or several to a dominant chord) are actually calling for five or more notes to form the complete chord. Since we can play a maximum of four notes on the ukulele, we have to toss out notes left and right to approximate these more complex chords. For example, a 9 chord needs five notes (the root, third, fifth, flat-seventh, and the ninth) so we usually throw out the root note and just play the other four notes.

Everything I can think of below ninth chords (dominants, add-nine, sue, augmented, etc) need four notes or fewer, so, in theory, we should be trying to play all these chords in full voicings.
 
I just wanted to add one voice of protest. It is very subjective but I hate the sound of the 12th interval of this 4-finger chord. Part of my reasoning is that I am always trying to fight the pitchiness of the uke and this chord is always too shrill for me. So I always choke off the A string. It is a moveable chord for me because I always mute the A string whillst fretting the E string.

It is funny because I do not have the same problem with this same shape with a flatted third to make the m7.

What I'm saying isn't meant to be didactic at all. I'm not advocating that anyone do as I do; I'm just documenting the possibility.
 
Thanks for posting, @Yukio! Such a clear explanation that even a musical dunce such as myself can grasp both the reasoning and the mechanics.

Watching that tutorial was a “D-oh!” (forehead slap) moment for me because, since I often transpose tunes to the Key of F, in many arrangements I’ve dropped the pinky finger to add the A string C note, but my little non-musical brain had never connected the dots to conclude that the resulting 4- finger shape is the moveable F7. Wow!

Thank you for educating me!
 
And, thank you, @rainbow21, for helping me correct my statement that it’s actually a moveable E7 shape and not F7. That had escaped my notice for the different reason that - purely due to ingrained laziness - I generally use the 2-string E7.
 
Peculiar, I have never seen any chord diagrams with the "fake" F7 chord. Only the suggested one.
It takes a bit of practice, but is quite doable. You use four fingers, but they are placed comfortably with respect to each other - and the two on the same fret helps getting them in place.
The corresponding way to do F∆ (Major 7th) however...
I never managed that one. A good thing the D shapes can be moved 😆
 
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The thing about extended chords is 1. we’re fundamentally playing a treble instrument and 2, outside of Bo Diddly, chords rarely happen by themselves.

When e.g. a 7b9 chord rolls along it’s almost always resolving, so, in C your “Fancy G7” (Gx7b9) can be Bdim7, giving you the 3-5-b7-b9, resolving to C or CM7 if you wanna be fancy . . Our brains are more than happy to fill in the missing G for us, and if we’re playing with a bassist, they’re already playing the G so we don’t need to.
 
I don't know if you guys play piano or know someone who does...but often they do not play all the notes of extended chords even though they have enough fingers to do so. If they played full chords it would be too muddy like primordial soup, so they keep the chords lean. And that's what I do with the ukulele. In case anyone is curious, here's what I play:

9 chord: 3, 5, b7, 9
11 chord: 1, 3, b7, 11
13 chord: 3, b7, 9, 13

And I understand if you take umbrage at rootless chords. I was the same way. I actually argued with Glen Rose, the author of several ukulele jazz books, about the topic. He convinced me that the root isn't so important to chord construction since all the other chord intervals are functionally related to the root and imply the root by their very presence. But perhaps were are traveling a little far afield for a beginner's thread
 
And, thank you, @rainbow21, for helping me correct my statement that it’s actually a moveable E7 shape and not F7. That had escaped my notice for the different reason that - purely due to ingrained laziness - I generally use the 2-string E7.
While the intervals are the same as an E7 chord, the fingering is different. Most players form an E7 chord using the first three fingers, which means it's not a moveable chord. I'd call this a moveable F7 shape if you want to name it after the lowest closed shape.
 
While the intervals are the same as an E7 chord, the fingering is different. Most players form an E7 chord using the first three fingers, which means it's not a moveable chord. I'd call this a moveable F7 shape if you want to name it after the lowest closed shape.
I have to be careful in any discussion of music theory, but...

When I look at most of my four finger chords, my fingering is different when I am in first position using less than four fingers (and counting "zero" fret as part of it. So is it incorrect to think of 2225 as a moveable C chord since I rarely play the 0003 with my pinky? In this case, any open chord that is fretted using the index finger would likely not be the moveable chord name because the index finger must now be used for what was the open string, often to barre the chord.
 
I have to be careful in any discussion of music theory, but...

When I look at most of my four finger chords, my fingering is different when I am in first position using less than four fingers (and counting "zero" fret as part of it. So is it incorrect to think of 2225 as a moveable C chord since I rarely play the 0003 with my pinky? In this case, any open chord that is fretted using the index finger would likely not be the moveable chord name because the index finger must now be used for what was the open string, often to barre the chord.
If I hear "a moveable C shape," I think 5433. Others may say, "No, that's a moveable Bb shape," and they'd be right.
Perhaps we should think of another way to describe the shapes. I first thought "Root on the first string," but that could mean that a D chord could be either 7655 or 2225.
??
 
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