The Got Aways

keenonuke

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What are your Got Aways those ukes you sold and wish you hadn't ANd/OR those you should have bought and now really regret.

The Sold and wish I hadn't: MP Tenor Pineapple with a concert scale. I sold this and could have bought another one from Mims on clearance. But at the time, money was tight and spending close to $500 was more than available funds for a ukulele.

The regrets:
Not buying a Moore Bettah a few years ago. At least I told the forum about the instrument.

Not buying the limited edition Kiwaya KPT-SNB.

And not buying a Martin Taropatch, now I have real hankering for one and am debating about posting a wanted listing on the Marketplace.
 
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The two I regret not buying were a Mainland mango baritone that I really wanted for a first uke but wouldn't let family spend that much on my Christmas and an Ohana TK 50 satin prototype from Mim that sold before I could get enough saved.

Neither are available new now and I just don't want used this time.

Lesson learned is buy it when available or don't and always wonder what if.
 
I don't have any that got away that I regret not getting but I wish I still had my first uke, a Lanikai LU-21C. It's not like I needed the money as I sold it for only $60 or so but at the time I was feeling guilty for having multiple ukes. Everything I own sounds better than that uke did but it sounded good enough and it somehow had a great feel while playing that I haven't experienced since. I was kind of a magical feel in an unexplainable way.
 
The two I regret not buying were... and an Ohana TK 50 satin prototype from Mim...
The TK-50ME CK-50ME (satin) is one of my "forever" keepers. I got it from Mim.

And mikelz777, a lot of us started out with something from the LU-21 series.
 
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What are your Got Aways those ukes you sold and wish you hadn't ANd/OR those you should have bought and now really regret.

The Sold and wish I hadn't: MP Tenor Pineapple with a concert scale. I sold this and could have bought another one from Mims on clearance. But at the time, money was tight and spending close to $500 was more than available funds for a ukulele.

The regrets:
Not buying a Moore Bettah a few years ago. At least I told the forum about the instrument.

And not buying a Martin Taropatch, now I have real hankering for one and am debating about posting a wanted listing on the Marketplace.

H’mm I kind of wish that I had more space for all the Ukes I’d like to have, guess I’m not alone in that.

I recently had chance to buy a Tin Guitar Soprano for a very good price, but I didn't and wonder if I was daft. Many years back there was a cracked Martin for sale locally at an attractive price, at the time I couldn’t have repaired it properly so I let it pass. I do wonder whether I should have bought it and waited until it could be repaired. Oh well, we can only enjoy so many ukes and so long as we enjoy what we play does it really matter too much about the rest …

Years back I bought and repaired an LU21-P (Lanikai Soprano Pineaple). I decided not to keep it because is was too similar to my Kala K—P and ‘just’ an entry level laminate Soprano. However that repaired Uke just had something about it - a feel of say provenance and ‘beusage’, and joy in its resurrection - that makes me feel that I should have kept it. I hope it went to a good home and, once again, got used lots.
 
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I sold a Collings tenor in a beautiful sunburst. Not having a crystal ball I didn't know Bill Collings would pass away and they would basically stop making ukuleles.

About 5 - 6 years ago I had the opportunity to have Chuck Moore build me a custom. The Cities policy had just been introduced and he was worried about shipping to Canada. If it got confiscated I was out a lot of money. I could of had it shipped to my sister in California but then I still had to get it to Canada.

On the flip side I have quickly jumped on a few gems before they sold that I still have. A Kamaka baritone 100th anniversary, a Koolau CS and an I'iwi in Redwood over walnut. The positives out weigh the negatives, I feel very fortunate to have what I have
 
On the flip side I have quickly jumped on a few gems before they sold that I still have. A Kamaka baritone 100th anniversary, a Koolau CS and an I'iwi in Redwood over walnut. The positives out weigh the negatives, I feel very fortunate to have what I have
Thanks @DownUpDave.

I needed that.
 
What are your Got Aways those ukes you sold and wish you hadn't ANd/OR those you should have bought and now really regret.

The Sold and wish I hadn't: MP Tenor Pineapple with a concert scale. I sold this and could have bought another one from Mims on clearance. But at the time, money was tight and spending close to $500 was more than available funds for a ukulele.

The regrets:
Not buying a Moore Bettah a few years ago. At least I told the forum about the instrument.

And not buying a Martin Taropatch, now I have real hankering for one and am debating about posting a wanted listing on the Marketplace.
Psst see https://www.markburnetguitars.co.uk...patch-8-string-uke-bridge-repair-for-sale-too
 
I don't have any that got away that I regret not getting but I wish I still had my first uke, a Lanikai LU-21C. It's not like I needed the money as I sold it for only $60 or so but at the time I was feeling guilty for having multiple ukes. Everything I own sounds better than that uke did but it sounded good enough and it somehow had a great feel while playing that I haven't experienced since. I was kind of a magical feel in an unexplainable way.
You never forget your first :)
 
Going all the way back to my teens, I've sold enough high-quality instruments -- Martin guitars, Selmer saxes, Fender steels, on and on -- to buy a luxury car or two at current prices. Since taking up ukulele a few years ago, I've acquired and parted with some beautiful instruments as well, including a Kanile'a baritone and super concert and a Kiwaya soprano. Of course, there have been many instruments I've been sorry to let go, but very few I regret selling now, for a couple of reasons. First, I remind myself that I had my reasons for parting with them, either to raise funds for something better, or because they just didn't suit my needs. More importantly, I believe instruments deserve to be treated as more than ornaments. Much as I value the craftsmanship and visual beauty of my instruments, any I don't use regularly I'd rather see in the hands of someone who will.
 
For almost ten years I used a Kala solid cedar top, acacia koa tenor cutaway A/E that was my go-to uke, but I had to give it up last year along with my six other standard depth ukes because it became difficult to play them with nerve damage to my neck spinal cord from radiation treatments for Hodgkins Disease in 1973 when I was 23. I kept a Lanikai thinline and replaced the others with five thinlines; another Lanikai, a Hricane, a Kala, and two customs by Bruce Wei in Vietnam.

I can't say I regret letting go of the Kala because the Hricane, Kala and custom thinlines play very well. I actually sold the regular depth Kala to an extended member of my group in Australia when her son was visiting here in Los Angeles. She's very happy with it. I find when it comes time to let go of an instrument, I don't have regrets.
 
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I have been buying and selling ukes for 13 years, mostly off UU marketplace. I have been happy with my purchases and sales but there are 2 sales that I wish I had back and 1 that got away because of my inaction.

Sales I wish I got back:
This is a beautiful Koa tenor. I purchased it and it just seemed flat to me. No life. Dare I say, "dead." but it was beautiful. I owned it for about 2 weeks trying to get accustomed to it. The second week I had an idea for a second opinion. I was presenting Jake Shimabukuo at the theatre that I founded. I would ask him to play it and my thought was that, of course, it would sound great when he played it and then I would hear the potential and fall in love with it. Jake picked it up and started playing Ave Maria. He looked at it. Turned it over and said, "yea, I see what you mean. I think that if you play it every day, it might eventually open up. It's beautiful." I sold it the next day. I told this story in the sales blurb and the person who purchased said they still wanted it because it "has Jakes Mojo on it." It sold literally in one minute after posting.
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Then there was a really nice Kanile'a Super tenor. A custom. I think it was a 2006. I loved the sound of it but was just big.

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The one that Got Away:
And then the one that I kick myself for not paying attention and pulling the trigger on was a red label recently put up for sale by @ukeclass. I remember talking to Chis about this uke and how great it was, and I just missed it by not logging in as much.

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Ed, even back then your heart knew you were a KoAloha type guy, and not Kanile'a.

The Pops mojo is as strong as Jake's, maybe stronger.
True-- I really wanted to like Kanile'a. I owned 5 and kept 1. I like the new ones much better with the fluorocarbon strings. In my early days I wanted to try every great uke that people on here were talking about and since there was no way to try them where I live, I needed to purchase. One day, a KoAloha tenor arrived at my door. I strummed and I remember so well how that sound went right through my body, and I believe it touched my soul. I never ever dreamed that I would ever get to meet Pops- and now look. Who knew?
 
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Ukulele I have parted with yet sometimes desire nonetheless:
  • J. Rieck #39 spruce & koa tenor. Sold to a fellow UUer after sitting too long unplayed in the aftermath of the acquisition of my current primary ‘ukulele.
  • Kala cedar & acacia tenor. Of sentimental value; my first uke.
  • Kanile’a super concert premium. The conduit through which I fell in love with ‘ukulele.
  • Takumi koa soprano. One stage in a history of intermittent ownership of underutilized sopranos.
  • Early Koaloha soprano. Introduced me to historical Hawai’ian repertoire, which remains personally central. Same as previous.
‘Ukulele I’d purchase if I could go back in time:
  • A Collings tenor deeply discounted by Dixie Ukulele as part of their going out of business sale. It had the attack of a fine piano, but I was too inexperienced at the time I encountered it to appreciate what I was holding.
  • Moore Bettah tenor auctioned during the 2018 2016 Tampa Bay Ukulele Getaway as part of a fundraiser for the Tampa Bay Ukulele Society. Fewer than 200 potential bidders were present. Sold after only a single bid.
  • Kanile’a Platinum 2020 #1
  • The Dino Muradian / Pops Okami pyrographed Pineapple Sunday
  • Beau Hanna Fretless Tenor #80
  • Any one of Ryan Condon’s archtop ‘ukulele
 
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Ed, I like how you put it, that you "really wanted to like" Kanile'a. That was my experience, too. I hadn't been playing ukulele long when I came in possession of a Kanile'a baritone and super concert, both beautiful instruments in near-mint condition. No knock on Kanile'a -- far from it -- but somehow on multiple levels I just never connected with those two. The neck of the super concert didn't sit comfortably in my hand and the tone lacked the warmth I was looking for. As good as the baritone sounded, it never had the same appeal as my humble Harmony, the only other baritone I had at the time. For many other people I'm sure these would be the ideal instruments. That's the thing: finding the right instrument is a trial-and-error process akin to finding the right person to be one's life partner. The difference is that when it comes to instruments I'm not monogamous. 😋
 
Ed, I like how you put it, that you "really wanted to like" Kanile'a. That was my experience, too. I hadn't been playing ukulele long when I came in possession of a Kanile'a baritone and super concert, both beautiful instruments in near-mint condition. No knock on Kanile'a -- far from it -- but somehow on multiple levels I just never connected with those two. The neck of the super concert didn't sit comfortably in my hand and the tone lacked the warmth I was looking for. As good as the baritone sounded, it never had the same appeal as my humble Harmony, the only other baritone I had at the time. For many other people I'm sure these would be the ideal instruments. That's the thing: finding the right instrument is a trial-and-error process akin to finding the right person to be one's life partner. The difference is that when it comes to instruments I'm not monogamous. 😋
My introduction to Kanile'a (which I had never heard of at that time) was in 2011 when I attended the Slack Key Guitar Festival in Waikiki. The only Hawaiian Ukulele I was familiar with at that time was Kamaka having owned a 1976 Kamaka 8-string tenor since the 70's. There was a Kanile'a booth there at the park and I thought the instruments were beautiful. I was not playing ukulele then, but I was impressed with how beautiful they looked. As I approached, I saw the prices and kept my hands by my side and just visually admired. Founder, Joe Souza was manning the booth and he picked one up and handed it to me. I was reluctant to even hold it and he gave me a super friendly smile and told me to go ahead and play it, and to feel free to play any that were there. I will never forget how welcoming and friendly he was. And with that, "I wanted to like Kanile'a", but I always found the sound muted, especially with the standard Aquilla strings which I could not adjust to.

I saw so many ukulele-performing artists playing Kanile'a and loving them. Alex at SUS favors them. I started paying attention and my thinking is that if you are finger-picking, it is excellent. The clarity of the notes shines, and if you have a pickup, you are golden, but if you are a strummer and playing in a group, it doesn't stand out. I am a better player now, and I have tried so many ukes, that I realize that I would love to have those two Kanle'a ukes back. I think I am ready for them.
 
I am a better player now, and I have tried so many ukes, that I realize that I would love to have those two Kanle'a ukes back. I think I am ready for them.

That's also something I meant to mention in my post, that with a few years' experience since I owned those Kanile'a instruments I'm sure I'd feel differently about them now, although I doubt they'd get nearly as much playing time as some of my other ukes. Unfortunately, I don't have access to any Kanile'a instruments, or anything else above mid-range Kala - Cordoba quality for that matter.
 
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