This looks like something a uke collector might want to have...arthur godfrey uke tuner!

Similar devices are still available on-line, but I’ve never seen one used by any player that I know. Maybe they are for help with cognitive and/or mobility issues?


If anyone wants one then be sure to buy one that matches the scale of the instrument.
 
When I was a child someone in my extended family had one on a plastic ukulele. I strummed it a couple of times, but it didn't sound like music. It sounded broken.

The marketing on the side of the box is classic Americana advertising—quick, easy, just press the button.

"Makes it easy for any man, woman, or youngster to play a ukulele — right from the start — without any lessons. Fits all standard ukuleles. Eliminates complicated 'fingering'... just press the button for the chord you want ... no need for teachers, no lessons, no experience."

Of course, this is all fine and dandy, except ... somebody has to tune the ukulele ... and that somebody had to have had a teacher or lessons or experience.
 
The seller calls it a tuner, but it's a chord depresser. Kind of like an auto harp. A neat bit of history, but a bit limiting. Might be good as an accessibility tool for someone with limited mobility in their hands.
Ah fascinating! Even better for uke completetists...or Authur Godfrey fans...I couldn't figure out how it was used ofr tuning so the depressor concept makes more sense.
 
Similar devices are still available on-line, but I’ve never seen one used by any player that I know. Maybe they are for help with cognitive and/or mobility issues?


If anyone wants one then be sure to buy one that matches the scale of the instrument.
I'm all for anything that legitmately assists people in playing an instrument.
 
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